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Lee Cronin: Print your own medicine | Video on TED.com

Chemist Lee Cronin is working on a 3D printer that, instead of objects, is able to print molecules. An exciting potential long-term application: printing your own medicine using chemical inks.
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A professor of chemistry, nanoscience and chemical complexity, Lee Cronin and his research group investigate how chemistry can revolutionize modern technology and even create life.

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cognition
How it evolved, what we do with it, futures; And otherwise interesting trends
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Does the unconscious know when you’re being lied to?

Does the unconscious know when you’re being lied to? | cognition | Scoop.it
The headlines BBC: Truth or lie – trust your instinct, says research British Psychological Society: Our subconscious mind may detect liars Daily Mail: Why you SHOULD go with your gut: Instinct is better at detecting lies than our conscious mind The...
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Consciousness Might Emerge from a Data Broadcast

Consciousness Might Emerge from a Data Broadcast | cognition | Scoop.it
What is consciousness? A neuroscientist's new book argues that it arises when information is broadcast throughout the brain

Quantum physicist Wolfgang Pauli expressed disdain for sloppy, nonsensical theories by denigrating them as “not even wrong,” meaning they were just empty conjectures that could be quickly dismissed. Unfortunately, many remarkably popular theories of consciousness are of this ilk—the idea, for instance, that our experiences can somehow be explained by the quantum theory that Pauli himself helped to formulate in the early 20th century. An even more far-fetched idea holds that consciousness emerged only a few thousand years ago, when humans realized that the voices in their head came not from the gods but from their own internal spoken narratives.

Not every theory of consciousness, however, can be dismissed as just so much intellectual flapdoodle. During the past several decades, two distinct frameworks for explaining what consciousness is and how the brain produces it have emerged, each compelling in its own way. Each framework seeks to explain a vast storehouse of observations from both neurological patients and sophisticated laboratory experiments.

 

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Jose M Quiroz's curator insight, April 13, 11:14 PM

just as this article emphasizes,  the consciousness is incredibly difficult to analyze. To be said is that we as humans are most likely to want an answer for what can't be answered yet; even if that requires implanting sensory devices in peoples skulls, and brains to discover what is yet to be answered. In this case it is a confusing material just as psychology is in great part gray area, indeed the conscious could be explained as the process of storing data to later be processed and used in the required way it is needed.

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25 Romantic Words That Don't Exist in English But Should

25 Romantic Words That Don't Exist in English But Should | cognition | Scoop.it
Because the world needs a name to call someone who has had sex with someone you've already had sex with. (It's buksvåger.)
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There is a word for it (whatever that 'it' is)...

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Wildcat: Some nothings are like elephants really big elephants

Wildcat: Some nothings are like elephants really big elephants | cognition | Scoop.it

No one knows how many kinds of nothings there are, also there are many kinds of knowing and also many kinds of one, yes, and many kinds of no, and many kinds of things, obviously there are many kinds of nothings, also many kinds of kinds.


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Why Christmas rituals make tasty food

Why Christmas rituals make tasty food | cognition | Scoop.it
All of us carry out rituals in our daily lives, whether it is shaking hands or clinking glasses before we drink.
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Daniel C. Dennett: The De-Darwinizing of Cultural Change (HeadCon '13 Part X) | Edge.org

Daniel C. Dennett: The De-Darwinizing of Cultural Change (HeadCon '13 Part X) | Edge.org | cognition | Scoop.it
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Well, think of this. Have you ever played in a chess game where you made a move and only later realized what a smart move it was but not admit it? You were just lucky but you've got a great rationalization for it later. I think that phenomenon is actually ubiquitous. A great deal of the very well-designed behavior that we engage in, we only think we understand, we only think we have to understand. We, in fact, have only a very limited understanding of it and don't need to have the understanding that tradition would say we have.

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New Drugs May Transform Down Syndrome

New Drugs May Transform Down Syndrome | cognition | Scoop.it
Recent breakthroughs may lead to pharmacological treatments for the chromosomal disorder
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“In the past six or seven years there have been several breakthroughs—and ‘breakthroughs’ is not by any means too big a word—in understanding the neurochemistry in Down syndrome,” Reeves says.

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Special Issue of Philosophical Psychology on Extended Cognition

Special Issue of Philosophical Psychology on Extended Cognition | cognition | Scoop.it
Some new directions in EC here I think.
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Daniel Kahneman changed the way we think about thinking. But what do other thinkers think of him?

Daniel Kahneman changed the way we think about thinking. But what do other thinkers think of him? | cognition | Scoop.it

Thinking, Fast and Slow was a global bestseller, and had a profound impact on psychology and economics, as these tributes from other leading figures show. 

Steven Pinker is a psychology professor at Harvard University. He is frequently named one of the world's top intellectuals and has twice been a finalist for the Pulitzer prize.

I've called Daniel Kahneman the world's most influential living psychologist and I believe that is true. He pretty much created the field of behavioural economics and has revolutionised large parts of cognitive psychology and social psychology. His central message could not be more important, namely, that human reason left to its own devices is apt to engage in a number of fallacies and systematic errors, so if we want to make better decisions in our personal lives and as a society, we ought to be aware of these biases and seek workarounds. That's a powerful and important discovery.

 


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Edge.org: WHAT SCIENTIFIC IDEA IS READY FOR RETIREMENT?

Edge.org: WHAT SCIENTIFIC IDEA IS READY FOR RETIREMENT? | cognition | Scoop.it
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The 2014 Question

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Course Profile: General Semantics MOOC - moocnewsandreviews.com

Course Profile: General Semantics MOOC - moocnewsandreviews.com | cognition | Scoop.it
Instructor Steve Stockdale at New Mexico State University discusses the upcoming Introduction to General Semantics MOOC, hosted on Canvas.net, which starts January 13.
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Eco - Papers: Beware of the Fallout: Umberto Eco and the Making of the Model Reader

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What is strange or impossible about this particular encyclopedia is not the propinquity of the things listed, but the site on which their propinquity would be possible; that system which organizes the elements yet which itself is not part of the grid. Where could animals that are “frenzied,” “innumerable,” and “drawn with a very fine camelhair brush” ever meet, except in “the immaterial sound of the voice pronouncing their enumeration, or on the page transcribing it? Where else could they by juxtaposed except in the non-place of language?”

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Scientists Find One Source of Prayer’s Power: Scientific American

Scientists Find One Source of Prayer’s Power: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
Communing with a higher power increases self-control
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Though we can all agree that to do so requires self-control, the authors propose that the source of such control might not be supernatural. Instead, it might come from something more earthly. Something accessible to even the most devoted atheist: social connection.

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Ann VanderMeer’s April Time Traveler’s Almanac Tour

Ann VanderMeer’s April Time Traveler’s Almanac Tour | cognition | Scoop.it
Hugo Award and World Fantasy Award winning editor Ann VanderMeer will be touring in support of her MASSIVE thousand-page time travel anthology, just featured on NPR with a review and interview on All Things Considered!
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Sign in to read: The fourth state of matter: Consciousness - opinion - 09 April 2014 - New Scientist

Sign in to read: The fourth state of matter: Consciousness - opinion - 09 April 2014 - New Scientist | cognition | Scoop.it
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Dangerous Comedian Robot Escapes Norwegian Research Lab

Dangerous Comedian Robot Escapes Norwegian Research Lab | cognition | Scoop.it
Oslo, Norway -- A military grade "comedian robot", the Prankbot 3000, has escaped its black box confinement in a University of Oslo Computational Humor Laboratory. The robot is considered dangerous...
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The Xenotext Experiment: An Interview with Christian Bök

The Xenotext Experiment: An Interview with Christian Bök | cognition | Scoop.it
Christian Bök: Postmodern life has utterly recoded the avant-garde demand for radical newness. Innovation in art no longer differs from the kind of manufactured obsolescence that has come to justify advertisements for “improved” products; nevertheless, we have to find a new way to contribute by generating a “surprise” (a term that almost conforms to the [...]
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20 Crucial Terms Every 21st Century Futurist Should Know

20 Crucial Terms Every 21st Century Futurist Should Know | cognition | Scoop.it
We live in an era of accelerating change, when scientific and technological advancements are arriving rapidly. As a result, we are developing a new language to describe our civilization as it evolves. Here are 20 terms and concepts that you'll need to navigate our future.
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Moral intuitions - HeadCon '13: Part IX | Edge.org

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Now, these are cute errors, and we can use them to do psychology studies on social exclusion, and we can learn quite a bit. In fact, it's kind of funny that you would kick a vending machine or that you would yell at your Windows machine when it gives you the blue screen of death, but they're increasingly failing to be that cute, because the more complex society gets, it turns out that these intuitions are some of the only intuitions we have to make sense of a social world that's quite different from the world in which we evolved. We've known this for quite some time.

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Experimental Philosophy and the Notion of the Self - HeadCon '13: Part VIII | Edge.org

hat experimental philosophers tend to do is to go after questions that are traditionally associated with philosophy but to go after them using the methods that have been traditionally associated with psychology

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Respect is a medicine

Respect is a medicine | cognition | Scoop.it
Aeon magazine has an excellent article on how social interactions among medical team members affect clinical outcomes, patient well-being and the number of medical errors that occur.
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The Technium | Edge.org

The Technium | Edge.org | cognition | Scoop.it

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A multitude of phantoms

A multitude of phantoms | cognition | Scoop.it
A fascinating paper in the neuroscience journal Brain looks at artistic depictions of phantom limbs – the feeling of the physical presence of a limb after it has been damaged or removed – and gives a wonderful insight how the brain perceives...
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We need to talk about TED

We need to talk about TED | cognition | Scoop.it
Benjamin Bratton: Science, philosophy and technology run on the model of American Idol – as embodied by TED talks – is a recipe for civilisational disaster

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Interview with SFWA Grand Master Ursula K. Le Guin - Amazing Stories

Interview with SFWA Grand Master Ursula K. Le Guin - Amazing Stories | cognition | Scoop.it
R. K. Troughton interviews Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA) Grand Master Ursula K. Le Guin.
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ASM: Science fiction started as a genre of hard science. You started publishing during a transitional phase for the industry, when many authors were exploring a broader spectrum of ideas. You focused more on sciences like anthropology, psychology, and sociology rather than chemistry, astronomy, and physics. While realism explores some of the subject matters you were writing about, you created fantastic elements to serve as your tapestry. What makes speculative fiction the perfect canvas for your imagination?

UKL:  I didn’t just arrive during a transition—I was one of the writers who started it. We moved SF away from being fixated on the “hard” sciences, but that’s only part of it. SF was a white-male-dominated field of adventure stories of an intellectual or imaginative kind, sometimes brilliantly conceived, often badly written. We raised the standards and made it into the complex, inclusive, prejudice-challenging, ever-changing kind of literature it is at its best today.

I can’t tell you why most of my fiction is imaginative rather than realistic; it’s just the way my mind works. Physics tell us us how the universe works, and that’s grand, but also we’re human, and the the social sciences are a goldmine of ideas for any writer interested in how being human works.

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