cognition
Follow
Find
7.2K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by FastTFriend
onto cognition
Scoop.it!

A Question for the Holiday Season: Who among Us Identifies with All of Humanity?: Scientific American

A Question for the Holiday Season: Who among Us Identifies with All of Humanity?: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
Psychologists discover a new element of religious—and political—impulses
FastTFriend's insight:

Quote: Ascale developed by psychologists Sam McFarland, Matthew Webb, and Derek Brown at Western Kentucky University measures the degree to which people identify with all humans, not just their kin, local communities, or other assorted in-groups.

more...
No comment yet.
cognition
How it evolved, what we do with it, futures; And otherwise interesting trends
Curated by FastTFriend
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by FastTFriend from The brain and illusions
Scoop.it!

The Periodic Table of Irrational Nonsense

The Periodic Table of Irrational Nonsense | cognition | Scoop.it
Created by Crispian Jago over at The Reason Stick, The Periodic Table of Irrational Nonsense attempts to rationalize the irrational. Great success? (click it to see a larger version)      

Via Gerald Carey
more...
Gerald Carey's curator insight, August 21, 8:20 AM

Great summarising list of the many things that done to fool us.

Click on the enlarged version so you can actually read it.

Rescooped by FastTFriend from Talks
Scoop.it!

A Magna Carta for the web

A Magna Carta for the web | cognition | Scoop.it

Sir Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web 25 years ago. So it’s worth a listen when he warns us: There’s a battle ahead. Eroding net neutrality, filter bubbles and centralizing corporate control all threaten the web’s wide-open spaces. It’s up to users to fight for the right to access and openness. The question is, What kind of Internet do we want?

 

http://on.ted.com/h0Pgm


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FastTFriend from Daily Magazine
Scoop.it!

Researchers discover sense of 'cuteness' is innate -- here's what it looks like

Researchers discover sense of 'cuteness' is innate -- here's what it looks like | cognition | Scoop.it
I dare you to try and look away.

Via Official AndreasCY
more...
Official AndreasCY's curator insight, August 15, 1:45 AM

Look at that hamster on a swing. It’s adorable. It doesn’t matter what you think of Obamacare.

Mike Lewis's curator insight, August 15, 10:03 AM

Can you tell the differences?

 

Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

Seeing ourselves through the eyes of the machine

Seeing ourselves through the eyes of the machine | cognition | Scoop.it
I’ve got an article in The Observer about how our inventions have profoundly shaped how we view ourselves because we’ve traditionally looked to technology for metaphors of human nature.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FastTFriend from The Aesthetic Ground
Scoop.it!

Ambient Genius - The New Yorker

Ambient Genius - The New Yorker | cognition | Scoop.it
In January, 1975, the musician Brian Eno and the painter Peter Schmidt released a set of flash cards they called “Oblique Strategies.” Friends since meeting at art school, in the late sixties, they had long shared guidelines that could pry apart an intellectual logjam, providing options when they couldn’t figure out how to move forward. The first edition consisted of a hundred and fifteen cards. They were black on one side with an aphorism or an instruction printed on the reverse. Eno’s first rule was “Honour thy error as a hidden intention.” Others included “Use non-musicians” and “Tape your mouth.” In “Brian Eno: Visual Music,” a monograph of his musical projects and visual art, Eno, who still uses the rules, says, “ ‘Oblique Strategies’ evolved from me being in a number of working situations when the panic of the situation—particularly in studios—tended to make me quickly forget that there were other ways of working and that there were tangential ways of attacking problems that were in many senses more interesting than the direct head-on approach.”

Via Xaos
more...
Ken Schneider's curator insight, August 13, 12:29 PM

Creative Arts have a lot to teach business about problem solving. Creative genius is an event not an attribute but hopefully if it occurs more than once a career it becomes hallmark. KS

Rescooped by FastTFriend from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
Scoop.it!

Why pay-what-you-want pricing may not be as crazy as it seems

Why pay-what-you-want pricing may not be as crazy as it seems | cognition | Scoop.it

Imagine you are about to check out from your overnight stay at a hotel in Paris. You get to the counter and the receptionist smiles and asks “how much would you like to pay?”

Say what? A hotel where you can choose to pay what you want?

It’s not a dream. It’s happening right now in Paris where a group of hotels allow you to book one of their rooms and pay only what you think the stay was worth.

Is this risky business? Surely people will jump at the opportunity to short change the hotel, paying much less that the standard rate. After all, we all love getting stuff for free.

Well it’s probably not as risky for the hotel as it first appears. Availability is limited to a set number of rooms and the interest the promotion has generated will probably outweigh any margin they lose on the standard rate. But more importantly, behavioural economics suggests that most guests will probably pay a fair amount anyway.


Via Alessandro Cerboni
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FastTFriend from Cognitive Neuroscience
Scoop.it!

Free Will May Just Be the Brain's 'Background Noise,' Scientists Say

Free Will May Just Be the Brain's 'Background Noise,' Scientists Say | cognition | Scoop.it
Free will may emerge from random background noise in the brain, new research suggests.

Via Sandeep Gautam
more...
Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, June 19, 10:05 PM

Just like DMN appeared as important resting state activity in fMRI; I believe analysis of resting state firing rates / noise will add much to our understanding.

Rescooped by FastTFriend from Wisdom 1.0
Scoop.it!

How did our legends really begin?

How did our legends really begin? | cognition | Scoop.it
In the great mythological narrative of Homer's Odyssey, the hero lands on the island of Sicily, the home of a race of one-eyed monsters, the Cyclopes. Finding a cave filled with a flock of sheep, the hero and his men feast on one of the animals until they are rudely interrupted by the cave's furious owner. The Cyclops Polyphemus vents his anger by eating a couple of the intruders before blocking the cave's entrance with a giant boulder.

Via Xaos
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FastTFriend from Wisdom 1.0
Scoop.it!

Wittgenstein,Tolstoy and the Folly of Logical Positivism | Issue 103 | Philosophy Now

Wittgenstein,Tolstoy and the Folly of Logical Positivism | Issue 103 | Philosophy Now | cognition | Scoop.it
Stuart Greenstreet explains how analytical philosophy got into a mess.

Via Xaos
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

Laurie Santos: What Makes Humans Unique (HeadCon '13 Part VII) | Edge.org

Laurie Santos: What Makes Humans Unique (HeadCon '13 Part VII) | Edge.org | cognition | Scoop.it
FastTFriend's insight:

I'm going to talk about some new findings in my field, comparative cognition. I'm interested in what makes humans unique. There are findings that I think are fantastically cool, in that they might be redefining how we think about human nature, but first they're going to pose for us some really interesting new problems.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

Weird Fiction StoryBundle: Two Weeks to Go!

StoryBundle has given me the exciting opportunity to curate a “weird fiction” bundle based on some of our Cheeky Frawg offerings, with my last story collection, blurbed by Junot Diaz, thrown in.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FastTFriend from 'Next Economy and Wealth'
Scoop.it!

Buddhist Economics: How to Stop Prioritizing Goods Over People and Consumption Over Creative Activity

Buddhist Economics: How to Stop Prioritizing Goods Over People and Consumption Over Creative Activity | cognition | Scoop.it
"Work and leisure are complementary parts of the same living process and cannot be separated without destroying the joy of work and the blis

Via Ferananda
more...
Eli Levine's curator insight, July 7, 4:31 PM

What good is wealth without happiness? What good is profit without purpose? These are things that the market isn't going to answer. These are problems t that require legislative action and law enforcement to solve. Otherwise greed will just come back to destroy its followers and many innocent civilians in the process. 

 

Think about it. 

Pierre Johnson's curator insight, July 7, 4:44 PM

Une perspective bouddhiste sur l'économie... Une voie de transition ?

Kurt Laitner's curator insight, July 8, 12:31 PM

phenomenally relevant 

Rescooped by FastTFriend from Philosophy everywhere everywhen
Scoop.it!

Why Not Just Weigh the Fish?Philosophers have always been the subject of ridicule

Why Not Just Weigh the Fish?Philosophers have always been the subject of ridicule | cognition | Scoop.it
When scientists dismiss philosophy as an antiquated relic of our pre-scientific past, they are making a very large and dubious assumption.

Morale these days has fallen pretty low along the corridors of philosophy departments. From one side, we get the mockery of the scientists. Freeman Dyson calls philosophy today “a toothless relic of past glories.” According to Neil deGrasse Tyson, majoring in philosophy “can really mess you up.” Stephen Hawking declares that “philosophy is dead.” From another side, we have to cope with the apostasy of our own leading figures. John Searle describes the field as being in “terrible shape.” Peter Unger says that philosophers are “under the impression that they’re saying something new and interesting about how it is about the world, when in fact this is all an illusion.” What’s going on? Has philosophy gone horribly amiss? Or are there broader cultural factors at work, perhaps something to do with a general decline in respect for the humanities?


Via Wildcat2030
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FastTFriend from Daily Magazine
Scoop.it!

Children with autism have extra synapses in brain

Children with autism have extra synapses in brain | cognition | Scoop.it
Children and adolescents with autism have a surplus of synapses in the brain, and this excess is due to a slowdown in a normal brain 'pruning' process during development, according to a study by neuroscientists at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). Because synapses are the points where neurons ...

Via Official AndreasCY
more...
Official AndreasCY's curator insight, August 22, 4:52 AM

Very interesting.

Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

“Don’t Read Books!” A 12th-Century Zen Poem

“Don’t Read Books!” A 12th-Century Zen Poem | cognition | Scoop.it
"It's annoying for others to have to hear you."

We live in a culture that often romanticizes books as the tender and exhilarating love-ma
FastTFriend's insight:

From text:

Don’t read books!
Don’t chant poems!
When you read books your eyeballs wither away
leaving the bare sockets.
When you chant poems your heart leaks out slowly
with each word.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FastTFriend from The Aesthetic Ground
Scoop.it!

Conference; Art and the New Biology of the Mind, Antonio Damasio - YouTube

March 24, 2006 Antonio Damasio, the David Dornsife Professor of Neuroscience and Director of The Brain and Creativity Institute, University of Southern Calif...

Via Xaos
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FastTFriend from Wisdom 1.0
Scoop.it!

Humanity's cultural history captured in 5-minute film

Humanity's cultural history captured in 5-minute film | cognition | Scoop.it
Video map of births and deaths shows rise and fall of cultural centres.

Via Xaos
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FastTFriend from Pierre Paperon
Scoop.it!

Carl G. Jung’s Synchronicity and Quantum Entanglement: Schrodinger’s Cat ‘Wanders’ Between Chromosomes

Carl G. Jung’s Synchronicity and Quantum Entanglement: Schrodinger’s Cat ‘Wanders’ Between Chromosomes | cognition | Scoop.it
One of the most prospective directions of study of C.G. Jung’s synchronicity phenomenon is reviewed considering the latest achievements of modern science.

Via Pierre Paperon
more...
Sarah Clarke's curator insight, August 2, 1:47 PM

I would relish it if synchronicity was proven to be a by product of quantum activity.  As a psych tested logic fiend I have never been able to shake the sense that there are links beneath the surface of days that peek through to shock or delight every now and then.

Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

The Way We Live Our Lives in Stories | Edge.org

The Way We Live Our Lives in Stories | Edge.org | cognition | Scoop.it
FastTFriend's insight:

We live in stories all day long—fiction stories, novels, TV shows, films, interactive video games. We daydream in stories all day long. Estimates suggest we just do this for hours and hours per day—making up these little fantasies in our heads, these little fictions in our heads. We go to sleep at night to rest; the body rests, but not the brain. The brain stays up at night. What is it doing? It's telling itself stories for about two hours per night. It's eight or ten years out of our lifetime composing these little vivid stories in the theaters of our minds.


/// Why are stories so trouble-focused? You have quite a bit of convergence among scholars and scientists who are looking at this from an evolutionary point of view, and what they're saying is that stories may function as kind of virtual reality simulators, where you go and you simulate the big problems of human life, and you enjoy it, but you're having a mental training session at the same time. There's some kind of interesting evidence for this, that these simulations might help people perform better on certain tasks.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FastTFriend from Cognitive Neuroscience
Scoop.it!

Grandma's Experiences Leave Epigenetic Mark on Your Genes | DiscoverMagazine.com

Grandma's Experiences Leave Epigenetic Mark on Your Genes | DiscoverMagazine.com | cognition | Scoop.it
Your ancestors' lousy childhoods or excellent adventures might change your personality, bequeathing anxiety or resilience by altering the epigenetic expressions of genes in the brain.

Via Sandeep Gautam
more...
Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, July 31, 9:22 AM

the science of epigenetics and the passing down of environmental memories (scarcity/ stress) down the generations!

Emanuela Russo's curator insight, August 14, 7:45 AM

Le esperienze e le vicissitudini dei tuoi antenati potrebbero influenzare e cambiare la tua personalità. 

Rescooped by FastTFriend from Global Brain
Scoop.it!

The Cultural Origins of Human Cognition

The Cultural Origins of Human Cognition | cognition | Scoop.it
Michael Tomasello argues that the roots of the human capacity for symbol-based culture, and the kind of psychological development that takes place within it, are based in a cluster of uniquely human cognitive capacities that emerge early in human...

Via Spaceweaver
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

The Greatest Commencement Addresses of All Time

The Greatest Commencement Addresses of All Time | cognition | Scoop.it
Kurt Vonnegut, J.K. Rowling, David Foster Wallace, Patti Smith, Anna Quindlen, Steve Jobs, and more.

The commencement address is the secu
FastTFriend's insight:

Haven't see them all, but it looks promising. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

Danielle - a time-lapse film about the ageing process - Aeon

Danielle - a time-lapse film about the ageing process - Aeon | cognition | Scoop.it
This 5-minute time-lapse brings the ageing process to life, showing the nearly imperceptible, seemingly unstoppable effects of time on a woman's face.
FastTFriend's insight:

Interesting to watch and offers a glimpse of our perception mechanism, somewhat cracking the usual time scale that form perceptive habits. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

Our unhealthy obsession with choice

Our unhealthy obsession with choice | cognition | Scoop.it
We face an endless string of choices, which leads us to feel anxiety, guilt and pangs of inadequacy that we are perhaps making the wrong ones. But philosopher Renata Salecl asks: Could individual choices be distracting us from something bigger—our power as social thinkers? A bold call for us to stop taking personal choice so seriously and focus on the choices we're making collectively.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

ONE HALF A MANIFESTO | Edge.org

ONE HALF A MANIFESTO | Edge.org | cognition | Scoop.it

The dogma I object to is composed of a set of interlocking beliefs and doesn't have a generally accepted overarching name as yet, though I sometimes call it "cybernetic totalism". It has the potential to transform human experience more powerfully than any prior ideology, religion, or political system ever has, partly because it can be so pleasing to the mind, at least initially, but mostly because it gets a free ride on the overwhelmingly powerful technologies that happen to be created by people who are, to a large degree, true believers.

FastTFriend's insight:

The distance between recognizing a great metaphor and treating it as the only metaphor is the same as the distance between humble science and dogmatic religion.

more...
No comment yet.