cognition
Follow
Find tag "self"
8.1K views | +0 today
cognition
How it evolved, what we do with it, futures; And otherwise interesting stuff
Curated by FastTFriend
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by FastTFriend from Wisdom 1.0
Scoop.it!

Hear Michel Foucault’s Lecture “The Culture of the Self,” Presented in English at UC Berkeley (1983)

Hear Michel Foucault’s Lecture “The Culture of the Self,” Presented in English at UC Berkeley (1983) | cognition | Scoop.it
United States in the last years of his life, particularly his time as a lecturer at UC Berkeley, proved to be extraordinarily productive in the development of his theoretical understanding of what he saw as the central question facing the contemporary West: the question of the self.

Via Xaos
FastTFriend's insight:

From text:

"The technique of confession, central even to secular psychoanalysis, informs a subjectivity that, for Foucault, always develops under the ever-watchful eyes of normalizing institutions. But in “The Culture of the Self,” Foucault reaches back to ancient Greek conceptions of “care of the self” (epimelieia beautou) to locate a subjectivity derived from a different tradition—a counterpoint to religious confessional and Freudian subjectivities and one he has discussed in terms of the technique of “self writing.” (The Care of the Self also happens to be the subtitle of the third volume of Foucault’s History of Sexuality, and “The Culture of the Self” the title of its second chapter.)"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

The Neuroscience of Everybody's Favorite Topic: Scientific American

The Neuroscience of Everybody's Favorite Topic: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
Why do people spend so much time talking about themselves?
FastTFriend's insight:

These results suggest that self-disclosure—revealing personal information to others—produces the highest level of activation in neural regions associated with motivation and reward, but that introspection—thinking or talking about the self, in the absence of an audience—also produces a noticeable surge of neural activity in these regions. Talking about the self is intrinsically rewarding, even if no one is listening.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

Safe in Our Archives – The New Inquiry

Safe in Our Archives – The New Inquiry | cognition | Scoop.it
FastTFriend's insight:

There will no sense of self that doesn’t take into account how the self has been or will be recorded, how that self will turn up as an artifact of online searches.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

The self: The one and only you - 20 February 2013 - New Scientist

The self: The one and only you - 20 February 2013 - New Scientist | cognition | Scoop.it
FastTFriend's insight:

Three beliefs about the self are absolutely fundamental for our belief of who we are. First, we regard ourselves as unchanging and continuous. This is not to say that we remain forever the same, but that among all this change there is something that remains constant and that makes the "me" today the same person I was five years ago and will be five years in the future.

Second, we see our self as the unifier that brings it all together. The world presents itself to us as a cacophony of sights, sounds, smells, mental images, recollections and so forth. In the self, these are all integrated and an image of a single, unified world emerges.

Finally, the self is an agent. It is the thinker of our thoughts and the doer of our deeds. It is where the representation of the world, unified into one coherent whole, is used so we can act on this world.

All of these beliefs appear to be blindingly obvious and as certain as can be. But as we look at them more closely, they become less and less self-evident.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

Experimental Philosophy and the Notion of the Self - HeadCon '13: Part VIII | Edge.org

hat experimental philosophers tend to do is to go after questions that are traditionally associated with philosophy but to go after them using the methods that have been traditionally associated with psychology

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

RSA - The Self Illusion: The brain's greatest con trick?

FastTFriend's insight:

Professor Bruce Hood shows that the concept of the 'self' is a figment of the brain, generated as a character to weave our internal processes and experiences together into a coherent narrative.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

The Julian Jaynes Collection | Edited by Marcel Kuijsten

The Julian Jaynes Collection | Edited by Marcel Kuijsten | cognition | Scoop.it
The Julian Jaynes Collection edited by Marcel Kuijsten
FastTFriend's insight:
Discussion of the life of Julian Jaynes.All of Jaynes's relevant articles and lectures for the first time gathered together in one volume.Previously unpublished lectures by Julian Jaynes, including "The Dream of Agamemnon," which extends his theory to dreams and the discovery of time, and "Imagination and the Dance of the Self," discussing the nature of the self, emotions, and the consequences of consciousness.Rare and previously unpublished radio and in-person interviews and in-depth question and answer sessions with Julian Jaynes discussing many aspects of his theory, including: the nature of consciousness, dreams, consciousness in children, cognition in animals, the discovery of time, the nature of the self, the mentality of tribes, emotions, art, music, poetry, prophecy, mental illness, therapy, the consequences and future of consciousness, brain hemisphere differences, vestiges of the bicameral mind, and much more. In these interviews and discussions, Jaynes addresses nearly every question one might have about his theory. This is the closest one could come to having a personal conversation with Julian Jaynes.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FastTFriend from Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Scoop.it!

Brainy Trees, Metaphorical Forests: On Neuroscience, Embodiment, and Architecture | Neuroanthropology

Brainy Trees, Metaphorical Forests: On Neuroscience, Embodiment, and Architecture | Neuroanthropology | cognition | Scoop.it

Inspiration and interpretation are inevitable. As metaphor is basic to what we do, so emerging results in neuroscience will be taken well beyond the intentions and even meanings of their authors. Much caution and critique will be needed. Yet at the same time, I want to preserve a space for this other mantle, from science to art and humanism. To creation and design and expression.

 

A revolution based on neuroscience? No. A recognition of our bodies and experiences and senses? Yes. And thus much closer to metaphors that inspire us every day. Like HOME or WARMTH. And maybe even a tree or two.


Via Sakis Koukouvis, Wildcat2030
more...
No comment yet.