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cognition
How it evolved, what we do with it, futures; And otherwise interesting trends
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Your Thoughts Can Release Abilities beyond Normal Limits: Scientific American

Your Thoughts Can Release Abilities beyond Normal Limits: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
Better vision, stronger muscles—expectations can have surprising effects, research finds
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Expecting to know the answers made people more likely to get the answers right.     

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Sign in to read: The internet shows the messy truth about knowledge - opinion - 15 February 2012 - New Scientist

Sign in to read: The internet shows the messy truth about knowledge - opinion - 15 February 2012 - New Scientist | cognition | Scoop.it

IN RECENT years, controversies over issues ranging from the possibility of faster-than-light neutrinos to the wisdom of routine screening for prostate cancer have increasingly raged outside the boundaries of peer-reviewed journals, and involved experts, know-nothings and everyone in between. The resulting messiness is not the opposite of knowledge. In the internet age it is what knowledge looks like, and it is something to regret for a moment, but then embrace and celebrate. Knowledge is fast reshaping itself around its new, networked medium - thereby becoming closer to what it truly was all along.

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Boundaries of the Knowable

Boundaries of the Knowable | cognition | Scoop.it
In this 10 part series from The Open University, Professor Russell Stannard OBE delves into subjects ranging from free will and determinism, to space and t
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Truth decay: The half-life of facts - science-in-society - 25 September 2012 - New Scientist

Truth decay: The half-life of facts - science-in-society - 25 September 2012 - New Scientist | cognition | Scoop.it

Much of what we believe to be factual has an expiration date, but the good news is that we can see it coming.

 

It is obvious that scientific knowledge is continually updated through new discoveries and the replication of studies, but until recent years little attention had been paid to how fast this change occurs. In particular, few had attempted to quantify how long it would take what we know at any given moment to become untrue, or replaced with a closer approximation of the truth.

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