cognition
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How it evolved, what we do with it, futures; And otherwise interesting stuff
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5 Sites and Apps to Read Free, Quick Short Stories Everyday - @MakeUSeOf

5 Sites and Apps to Read Free, Quick Short Stories Everyday - @MakeUSeOf | cognition | Scoop.it
If you aren’t reading fiction already, you should be! Reading fiction has several benefits, studies have shown, from relieving stress and sleeping better to lightening your mood and keeping your mind sharp as you age.

Now, it’s advisable to target one brain-boosting habit each year. So for 2016, let’s make it about reading a little fiction every day. Like with any habit, the less resistance in getting started, the easier it will be.

We scoured the world wide web for the best sites and apps that serve a dose of short stories whenever you want them. Here’s what you need.

Via John Evans
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Surrealist-Expressionist Mash-Up: Alfred Kubin, Decadents, Max Brod, Franz Blei, The First Hour After Death, and Last Drink Bird Head

Surrealist-Expressionist Mash-Up: Alfred Kubin, Decadents, Max Brod, Franz Blei, The First Hour After Death, and Last Drink Bird Head | cognition | Scoop.it
"The characteristic feature of this strange art is that it attempts to depict the extrasensory, to provide symbols for the mysterious forces to which we are subjected in our daily lives but which w...
FastTFriend's insight:

Thi s short "story" by Jeff Vandermeer, included in City of Saints and Madmen is a gem (as is the whole book).

 

"In the first hour after death, the room is so still that every sound holds a terrible clarity, like the tap of a knife against glass. The soft pad of shoes as someone walks away and closes the door is profoundly solid—each short footstep weighted, distinct. The body lies against the floor, the sightless eyes staring down into the wood as if some answer has been buried in the grain. The back of the head is mottled by the shadows of the trees that sway outside the open window. "

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You Won't Believe How Insanely Detailed This Guy's Fictional Maps Are. Seriously. - Wired Science

You Won't Believe How Insanely Detailed This Guy's Fictional Maps Are. Seriously. - Wired Science | cognition | Scoop.it
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People in the Koana Islands love baseball. The first league play started in 1882, barely six years after the MLB. Between the top-tier, Triple- and Double-A leagues, there are over 180 teams spanning the island nation. Fans are so rabid that there's even talk of expanding to a Single-A league, adding even more teams. If you're a baseball fan, you might be surprised you've never heard of this. You'll be even more surprised when you try to find the Koana Islands. That's because the 32-island chain, with its nine major cities, 11 national parks, 93 million residents and a landmass that is equal to Spain and Sweden combined does not really exist.

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{ Jeff VanderMeer }

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Preamble:This is an approximate decryption. The exact meaning of the encrypted story, the precise words used to compose it in encrypted form, and the emotional resonance of decrypting the story are subject to change. Without decrypting the story yourself, your personal reaction to it will always be muted and inexact. A strange impulse will come over you. A kind of curiosity. This impulse will direct you to decrypt the story even after you believe you have interpreted its meaning from the pages that follow this note. At night, with a flashlight, your lover asleep next to you, you will find yourself turning pages, scribbling words, intuiting numerals. In the morning, spent, you will remember nothing but a faint tingle in the temples, where resides information you cannot quite retrieve.

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Novel Finding: Reading Literary Fiction Improves Empathy: Scientific American

Novel Finding: Reading Literary Fiction Improves Empathy: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
The types of books we read may affect how we relate to others
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When they read excerpts of genre fiction, such as Danielle Steel’s The Sins of the Mother, their test results were dually insignificant. However, when they read literary fiction, such as The Round House by Louise Erdrich, their test results improved markedly—and, by implication, so did their capacity for empathy. 

 

...Literary fiction, by contrast, focuses more on the psychology of characters and their relationships. “Often those characters’ minds are depicted vaguely, without many details, and we’re forced to fill in the gaps to understand their intentions and motivations,” Kidd says. This genre prompts the reader to imagine the characters’ introspective dialogues. This psychological awareness carries over into the real world, which is full of complicated individuals whose inner lives are usually difficult to fathom.

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INTERVIEW WITH ISAAC ASIMOV

1975 ARC Identifier 54491 / Local Identifier 306.9415. 

FastTFriend's insight:

BOURGIN INTERVIEWS ISAAC ASIMOV, BIOCHEMIST AND SCIENCE FICTION WRITER. MR. ASIMOV MAY BE THE MOST WIDELY READ OF ALL SCIENCE FICTION WRITERS, HAVING WRITTEN 155 BOOKS AND HUNDREDS OF MAGAZINE ARTICLES AND SHORT STORIES. A CLIP OF "FANTASTIC VOYAGE," BASED ON HIS BOOK, IS INSERTED IN THE PROGRAM. VIEWERS WILL FIND THIS INTERVIEW PROVOCATIVE IN REGARD TO WHAT MR. ASIMOV HAS TO SAY ABOUT WRITING AND THE FUTURE OF THIS EARTH

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