Coffee Party News
Follow
Find
720.8K views | +1 today
Fact-based, solutions-oriented, people-powered news for the 99%
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Coffee Party USA
Scoop.it!

Sen. Elizabeth Warren Grills Regulators On Taking Banks To Trial

by EYDER PERALTA, NPR


In her debut appearance today at a Senate Banking Committee hearing, Sen. Elizabeth Warren from Massachusetts made federal regulators uncomfortable when she asked a simple question: When was the last time you took a big Wall Street bank all the way to trial? [READ MORE]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Coffee Party USA
Scoop.it!

Study Shows Republicans & Democrats Process Risk Differently

via Dama Godiva:


A team of political scientists and neuroscientists has shown that liberals and conservatives use different parts of the brain when they make risky decisions, and these regions can be used to predict which political party a person prefers. The new study suggests that while genetics or parental influence may play a significant role, being a Republican or Democrat changes how the brain functions.


Democrats showed significantly greater activity in the left insula, a region associated with social and self-awareness. Meanwhile Republicans showed significantly greater activity in the right amygdala, a region involved in the body’s fight-or-flight system. These results suggest that liberals and conservatives engage different cognitive processes when they think about risk. [MORE]

Coffee Party USA's insight:

I would not have thought this break down of brain use would have played out this way without reading this but it does make sense. This explains why FOX news reports that play so much the "reactive" right side of the brain work well with those that tend to be referred to as conservative. The topics of Fox News are designed to override the controls of the left sided rational thought and cause reactive alarmed behavioral responses. Advertising also plays to the right side of the brain and attempts to encourage people to react and buy something based on messages that appeal so strongly to our emotions. Our left side knows that a Nikes swish marks won’t really turn us into winning sportsman but we buy it because we react to all the messages that “Show” us and convince our heart strings owning the shoes will make the difference.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Coffee Party USA
Scoop.it!

Diplomacy for Sale as Ambassadorships get Auctioned off to Big-Ticket Donors

Diplomacy for Sale as Ambassadorships get Auctioned off to Big-Ticket Donors | Coffee Party News | Scoop.it
Pres. Obama has continued a decades long practice with appointing big political donors to top ambassadorships around the world. Photo Courtesy: U.S. State Department.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Coffee Party USA
Scoop.it!

House GOP: No new tax bills

House GOP: No new tax bills | Coffee Party News | Scoop.it
They're postponing passage until the party decides whether to reform the Tax Code.
Coffee Party USA's insight:

Excerpt;

"Republicans think the political environment has shifted in their favor: They think they have the upper hand in the sequester fight. They don’t have to pass anything, and the cuts will take effect. They are guided, in part, by a new mantra: Pick smart fights, and keep expectations low."

 

This curator is not sure where the GOP came up with the idea things are shifting in their favor as a given and they no longer need to work with the Democrats. This seems that the house has found a way to nueter a Senate that was elected by the people. They have in fact proven they pick fights like a bully or the four year old in front of the candy rack and they certainly keep expectations low. Bullies and four year olds are smart fighters. They pick fights that manipulate or at least try to manipulate others to bend to their will or they will make them suffer until they do bend. In this case the GOP’s will is most likely the will of those that paid for their fancy ads and future revolving doors. Allowing the rich more money is definitely a job creator when it comes to officials that the super rich and corporations promote to get elected to their job and stay in office so the rich can have tax codes custom designed to fit their wishes and keep all their money and everyone else’s too. I’m sure they aren’t worried about rewriting tax codes to help those below $50,000 or $60,000 for a family of four.

 

more...
Joseph Pomponio's comment, February 12, 2013 6:23 AM
No doubt Republicans will drag fiscal resolutions out. The game long term is to shift tax burdens to lower income, Telling them they will have more disposable income with lower taxes. Reality their employers will tell them they make enough and don't need raises. The one percent will get what they want, more control and with it more power.
Scooped by Coffee Party USA
Scoop.it!

BREAKING NEWS: Overturning Citizen’s United Not Enough – We the People Amendment Introduced

BREAKING NEWS: Overturning Citizen’s United Not Enough – We the People Amendment Introduced | Coffee Party News | Scoop.it
On Monday, February 11th at 10AM at the National Press Club in Washington DC, Move to Amend will join members of Congress as they introduce Move to Amend’s “We the People Amendment”, an amendment that clearly and unequivocally states that: 1)...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Coffee Party USA
Scoop.it!

How House Democrats Plan To Use Local Power To Stop Gun Violence – And How To Do It Better

How House Democrats Plan To Use Local Power To Stop Gun Violence – And How To Do It Better | Coffee Party News | Scoop.it

by Zack Beauchamp, Think Progress
 

On Thursday afternoon, the House Democratic Gun Violence Prevention Task Force released a framework document laying out fifteen proposals for gun violence prevention legislation. It’s a good document, reaching beyond the mainstay proposals like an assault weapon bans to less heralded, but equally important issues like restrictions on the federal government’s ability to help state and local police track local guns. But the most unique proposals in the framework are also some of the ones most in need of improvement: its recommendations for supporting local efforts against gun violence.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Coffee Party USA
Scoop.it!

Virtual Townhall on Immigration Reform w/ Annabel & Eric - Feb 10,2013

Virtual Townhall on Immigration Reform w/ Annabel & Eric - Feb 10,2013 | Coffee Party News | Scoop.it

by Annabel Park


Eric Byler and I have set up a series of Virtual Townhalls on Coffee Party Radio, each designed to hear from you. Our latest was about immigration reform.  

In his recent blog, Eric Byler began the conversation by explaining some of the reasons why there is broad consensus that immigration reform would be a huge boost to our national economy.

What could be more important that boosting the economy? We heard some interesting arguments during our town hall, mostly centered around the notion that undocumented immigrants have committed a crime, and for every crime there must be a punishment. [LISTEN to the show}

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Coffee Party USA
Scoop.it!

Jack Abramoff, An Insider's View on Corruption

Do you think the American government represents the American people? Neither do we, and we're out to fix it. Join the campaign to pass the American Anti-Corr...
Coffee Party USA's insight:

This is a short video that sums up the idea that are officails judgements  and legislation and contract offers are for sale told by someone that use to buy them. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Coffee Party USA
Scoop.it!

Sen. Marco Rubio will give bilingual GOP response to State of the Union speech - MiamiHerald.com

Sen. Marco Rubio will give bilingual GOP response to State of the Union speech - MiamiHerald.com | Coffee Party News | Scoop.it
MiamiHerald.com
Sen. Marco Rubio will give bilingual GOP response to State of the Union speech MiamiHerald.com It's the first time such a high-profile speech will be given in two languages by the same person, and it's a sign of how crucial the...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Coffee Party USA
Scoop.it!

Overhauling Immigration: Asians Matter Too

Overhauling Immigration: Asians Matter Too | Coffee Party News | Scoop.it
The national conversation about overhauling immigration often focuses on Latino immigrants. But what works for one ethnic group may not be ideal for all. Host Michel Martin finds out what Asian immigrants want most from immigration reform.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Coffee Party USA
Scoop.it!

Viral Story About Free Wi-Fi Spotlights Mostly Hidden Policy War

Viral Story About Free Wi-Fi Spotlights Mostly Hidden Policy War | Coffee Party News | Scoop.it
You've heard of the war on women, the war on religion, and more recently even the war on the Second Amendment. Washington is full of so-called wars. But a war on Wi-Fi?
Coffee Party USA's insight:

This is a debate as citzens, we need to be really actively involved with. Those who control the message control the masses.

Excerpt;

 "So while the FCC doesn't really have a plan that likely will lead to public and free Wi-Fi across the nation, the controversial story did at least give many people a chance to stumble into a national policy debate that, to most folks, had been as invisible as radio waves."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Coffee Party USA from Coffee Party Election Coverage
Scoop.it!

Noam Chomsky - Rightward Shift of US Politics

Noam Chomsky is Professor Emeritus at MIT, and one of the nation's leading intellectual critics of the US political, corporate and national security apparatu...

Via Michael Charney
more...
Michael Charney's curator insight, February 3, 2013 9:41 AM

For those of us who aren't interested in the Super Bowl (you know who you are!), here's an alternative way to spend an hour this evening....

Scooped by Coffee Party USA from Coffee Party Election Coverage
Scoop.it!

Can the Republicans Be Saved From Obsolescence?

Exerpt from article by ROBERT DRAPER, New York Times


One afternoon last month, I flew with Anderson to Columbus, Ohio, to watch her conduct two focus groups. The first consisted of 10 single, middle-class women in their 20s; the second, of 10 20-something men who were either jobless or employed but seeking better work. All of them voted for Obama but did not identify themselves as committed Democrats and were sufficiently ambivalent about the president’s performance that Anderson deemed them within reach of the Republicans. Each group sat around a large conference table with the pollster, while I viewed the proceedings from behind a panel of one-way glass.

The all-female focus group began with a sobering assessment of the Obama economy. All of the women spoke gloomily about the prospect of paying off student loans, about what they believed to be Social Security’s likely insolvency and about their children’s schooling. A few of them bitterly opined that the Democrats care little about the working class but lavish the poor with federal aid. “You get more off welfare than you would at a minimum-wage job,” observed one of them. Another added, “And if you have a kid, you’re set up for life!”

About an hour into the session, Anderson walked up to a whiteboard and took out a magic marker. “I’m going to write down a word, and you guys free-associate with whatever comes to mind,” she said. The first word she wrote was “Democrat.”

“Young people,” one woman called out.

“Liberal,” another said. Followed by: “Diverse.” “Bill Clinton.”

“Change.”“Open-minded.”“Spending.”“Handouts.”“Green.”“More science-based.”

When Anderson then wrote “Republican,” the outburst was immediate and vehement: “Corporate greed.”“Old.”“Middle-aged white men.” “Rich.” “Religious.” “Conservative.” “Hypocritical.” “Military retirees.” “Narrow-minded.” “Rigid.” “Not progressive.” “Polarizing.” “Stuck in their ways.” “Farmers.”
 

Anderson concluded the group on a somewhat beseeching note. “Let’s talk about Republicans,” she said. “What if anything could they do to earn your vote?”

A self-identified anti-abortion, “very conservative” 27-year-old Obama voter named Gretchen replied: “Don’t be so right wing! You know, on abortion, they’re so out there. That all-or-nothing type of thing, that’s the way Romney came across. And you know, come up with ways to compromise.”

“What would be the sign to you that the Republican Party is moving in the right direction?” Anderson asked them.

“Maybe actually pass something?” suggested a 28-year-old schoolteacher named Courtney, who also identified herself as conservative.

The session with the young men was equally jarring. None of them expressed great enthusiasm for Obama. But their depiction of Republicans was even more lacerating than the women’s had been. “Racist,” “out of touch” and “hateful” made the list — “and put ‘1950s’ on there too!” one called out.

Showing a reverence for understatement, Anderson said: “A lot of those words you used to describe Republicans are negative. What could they say or do to make you feel more positive about the Republican Party?”

“Be more pro-science,” said a 22-year-old moderate named Jack. “Embrace technology and change.” [MORE]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Coffee Party USA
Scoop.it!

Robert Reich: Economy, Inequality and Obama's Second Term

Speaker: Robert Reich, Chancellor's Professor of Public Policy, Richard and Rhoda Goldman School of Public Policy, University of California, Berkeley http://...
Coffee Party USA's insight:

This is a well-presented talk by Reich. You can move past the opening announcements and on to the talk once the video loads some. This is full length, so it takes a little time. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Coffee Party USA from Coffee Party Election Coverage
Scoop.it!

State of the Union: The PREGAME SHOW! Tonight 8PM EST on THE MIDDLE GROUND! Join the Show at 646-929-2495

State of the Union: The PREGAME SHOW! Tonight 8PM EST on THE MIDDLE GROUND! Join the Show at 646-929-2495 | Coffee Party News | Scoop.it

Join us tonight on THE MIDDLE GROUND for the SOTU pregame show in which we discuss what we want/hope President Obama will say. 

What are you thoughts, and what do you think is the current "state of the union?"


Presented by Coffee Party USA, "The Middle Ground" covers a variety of topics with a trans-partisan approach with an eye to finding the place where the two major political parties share that 'middle ground.' Co-hosted by award-winning filmmaker Eric Byler (center-left perspective) and political author Michael Charney (center-right perspective), the show airs every Tuesday 8 to 9:30 pm ET.


We love our callers: 646-929-2495.

TONIGHT: 8-9 PM EST / 5-6 PM PST

CLICK HERE to listen live or to the archived recording



Via Michael Charney
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Coffee Party USA
Scoop.it!

Lee Atwater's Infamous 1981 Interview on the Southern Strategy

In 1981, the legendarily brutal campaign consultant Lee Atwater, after a decade as South Carolina's most effective Republican operative, was working in Ronald Reagan's White House when he was interviewed by Alexander Lamis, a political scientist at Case Western Reserve University. 

In this audio, made public for the first time ever, Atwater lays out how Republicans can win the vote of racists without sounding racist themselves. Listen to the full audio and read Rick Perlstein's analysis here.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Coffee Party USA
Scoop.it!

Why Republicans are the Party of White People

Why Republicans are the Party of White People | Coffee Party News | Scoop.it

Excerpts from piece by Sam Tanenhaus for The New Republic


When the intellectual authors of the modern right created its doctrines in the 1950s, they drew on nineteenth-century political thought, borrowing explicitly from the great apologists for slavery, above all, the intellectually fierce South Carolinian John C. Calhoun. This is not to say conservatives today share Calhoun's ideas about race. It is to say instead that the Calhoun revival, based on his complex theories of constitutional democracy, became the justification for conservative politicians to resist, ignore, or even overturn the will of the electoral majority...

 

“American politics,” Wills wrote in 1975, “is the South’s revenge for the Civil War.” He was referring to the rise of Southern and Sunbelt figures—the later ones would include Jimmy Carter, Reagan, Bill Clinton, and the two Bushes—whose dominance of presidential politics ended only with Obama’s election in 2008. However, the two parties dealt with race differently. Carter and Clinton had pro–civil rights histories and directly courted black voters. But as the GOP continued remolding itself into a Southern party—led in the ’90s by the Georgian Newt Gingrich and by the Texans Dick Armey and Tom DeLay—it resorted to an overtly nullifying politics: The rise of the Senate veto as a routine obstructionist tool, Jesse Helms’s warning that Clinton “better have a bodyguard” if he ever traveled to North Carolina, the first protracted clashes over the debt ceiling, Gingrich’s threat to withhold disaster relief, the government shutdown, Clinton’s impeachment despite public disapproval of the trial. All this, moreover, seemed to reflect, or at least parallel, extremism in the wider culture often saturated in racism: Let’s not forget Minutemen and Aryan Nation militias, nor the “anti-government” terrorist Timothy McVeigh, whom the FBI linked to white supremacists. The war on government—and against agencies like the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives—had become a metaphor for the broader “culture wars,” one reason that the GOP’s dwindling base is now at odds with the “absolute majority” on issues like gun control and same-sex marriage.

Reformers in the GOP insist that this course can be reversed with more intensive outreach efforts, better recruitment of minority candidates, and an immigration compromise. And a new cast of GOP leaders—Ted Cruz, Nikki Haley, Bobby Jindal, Marco Rubio—have become national favorites. But each remains tethered to movement ideology. At the recent National Review Institute conference in Washington, Cruz even urged a “partial government shutdown,” recalling the glory years of the ’90s, but downplaying its destructive outcome.


Denial has always been the basis of a nullifying politics. Calhoun, too, knew he was on the losing side. The arithmetic he studied most closely was the growing tally of new free territories. Eventually, they would become states, and there would be sufficient “absolute” numbers in Congress to abolish slavery. A century later, history pushed forward again. Nonetheless, conservatives, giving birth to their movement, chose to ignore these realities and to side with “the South.”

Race will always be a complex issue in America. There is no total cleansing of an original sin. But the old polarizing politics is a spent force. The image of the “angry black man” still purveyed by sensationalists such as Ann Coulter and Dinesh D’Souza is anachronistic today, when blacks and even Muslims, the most conspicuous of “outsider” groups, profess optimism about America and their place in it. A politics of frustration and rage remains, but it is most evident within the GOP’s dwindling base—its insurgents and anti-government crusaders, its “middle-aged white guys.” They now form the party’s one solid bloc, its agitated concurrent voice, struggling not only against the facts of demography, but also with the country’s developing ideas of democracy and governance. We are left with the profound historical irony that the party of Lincoln—of the Gettysburg Address, with its reiteration of the Declaration’s assertion of equality and its vision of a “new birth of freedom”—has found sustenance in Lincoln’s principal intellectual and moral antagonist. It has become the party of Calhoun. [READ full article]
 

Sam Tanenhaus, editor of The New York Times Book Review, is working on a biography about William F. Buckley Jr.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Coffee Party USA
Scoop.it!

Story of America: Darren's Journey

by Eric Byler, Story of America

 

The journey of Darren Wagner will help you touch the surface of an ocean of despair that has washed over Newtown and Sandy Hook, Connecticut. We had to stop filming after Darren told this story to Annabel. She was overcome with tears and could not muster a follow-up question. Behind the camera, I was crying too.

 

When we resumed, Annabel asked Darren about parenting, and social expectations of masculinity. Not so implicit was the fact that he had been crying, and his two teenage sons were right upstairs.

 

Before the Sandy Hook massacre, Darren had never really talked to his sons about his 11-year career as a Deputy Sheriff in Ohio. He had never told them about the horrific gun violence he had investigated, the tragedies he had witnessed, the "regret to inform" conversations he'd had, over and over again. He had never told them how gun violence had caused him to leave the law enforcement field and seek a peaceful life, a journey that led him to their mother, Georgia, and a quiet life in Australia, where Georgia and their two sons were born. [MORE]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Coffee Party USA
Scoop.it!

Coffee Party Radio: Politics Done Right w/Egberto Willies–Drones, Guns, & Sequester Sat 12–2PM CST

Coffee Party Radio: Politics Done Right w/Egberto Willies–Drones, Guns, & Sequester Sat 12–2PM CST | Coffee Party News | Scoop.it
Politics Done Right with Egberto Willies Saturday 12:00 Noon Central/1:00 PM Eastern Call In, talk and/or Listen: (646) 929-2495 Listen On Computer/Smartphone Live/Podcast: HERE  This week’s show Happy Birthday President Ronald...
Coffee Party USA's insight:

Here's the Feb. 9th, 2013 show in case you missed this.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Coffee Party USA
Scoop.it!

Why Are Conservatives Trying to Destroy the Voting Rights Act?

Why Are Conservatives Trying to Destroy the Voting Rights Act? | Coffee Party News | Scoop.it

A five-decade bipartisan consensus on this key piece of civil rights legislation has collapsed—right when we need its protections more than ever before


by Ari Berman, The Nation


In 2006, Congress voted overwhelmingly to reauthorize key provisions of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 for another twenty-five years. The legislation passed 390–33 in the House and 98–0 in the Senate. Every top Republican supported the bill. “The Voting Rights Act must continue to exist,” said House Judiciary chair James Sensenbrenner, a conservative Republican, “and exist in its current form.” Civil rights leaders flanked George W. Bush at the signing ceremony.

Seven years later, the bipartisan consensus that supported the VRA for nearly fifty years has collapsed, and conservatives are challenging the law as never before. Last November, three days after a presidential election in which voter suppression played a starring role, the Supreme Court agreed to hear a challenge to Section 5 of the VRA, which compels parts or all of sixteen states with a history of racial discrimination in voting to clear election-related changes with the federal government. The case will be heard on February 27. The lawsuit, originating in Shelby County, Alabama, is backed by leading operatives and funders in the conservative movement, along with Republican attorneys general in Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Georgia, South Carolina, South Dakota and Texas. Shelby County’s brief claims that “Section 5’s federalism cost is too great” and that the statute has “accomplished [its] mission.”


The current campaign against the VRA is the result of three key factors: a whiter, more Southern, more conservative GOP that has responded to demographic change by trying to suppress an increasingly diverse electorate; a twenty-five-year effort to gut the VRA by conservative intellectuals, who in recent years have received millions of dollars from top right-wing funders, including Charles Koch; and a reactionary Supreme Court that does not support remedies to racial discrimination. [MORE]

more...
Joseph Pomponio's comment, February 12, 2013 6:42 AM
Because their policies will not hep lower income citizens.
Scooped by Coffee Party USA
Scoop.it!

How Many People Have Been Killed by Guns Since Newtown?

How Many People Have Been Killed by Guns Since Newtown? | Coffee Party News | Scoop.it
The answer to the simple question in that headline is surprisingly hard to come by. So Slate and the Twitter feed @GunDeaths are collecting data for our crowdsourced interactive. This data is necessarily incomplete.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Coffee Party USA
Scoop.it!

The .03% Solution

The .03% Solution | Coffee Party News | Scoop.it

by Jesse Eisinger, ProPublica


Last month, 11 European countries, including France and Germany, moved forward on introducing a minuscule tax on trades in stocks, bonds and derivatives. The tax goes by many names. It's often called a Tobin tax, after the economist James Tobin. In Europe it goes by the more pedestrian financial transaction tax. In Britain, it goes by the wonderful Robin Hood tax, and is supported in an often clever campaign.


On this side of the Atlantic, there is a ghostly silence on a transaction tax in respectable political quarters. But that might change. This month, Sen. Tom Harkin, Democrat of Iowa, and Rep. Peter DeFazio, Democrat of Oregon, plan to reintroduce their bill calling for just such a tax.


A transaction tax could raise a huge amount of money and cause less pain than many alternatives. It could offset the need for cuts to the social safety net or tax increases that damage consumer demand. How huge a sum? Harkin and DeFazio got an estimate from the bipartisan Joint Committee on Taxation, which scores tax plans. It's a hearty one: $352 billion over 10 years.


The money would come from a tiny levy. The bill calls for a three-basis-point charge on most trades. A basis point is one-hundredth of a percentage point. So it amounts to 3 cents on every $100 traded. [MORE]


more...
Joseph Pomponio's comment, February 8, 2013 6:32 AM
Monica, i agree completely. But lets remember what money in politics buys.
Scooped by Coffee Party USA
Scoop.it!

Another win for the movement to overturn Citizens United v. FEC

Another win for the movement to overturn Citizens United v. FEC | Coffee Party News | Scoop.it
Note: Citizens United v. Federal Election Commissionis the 2010 U.S. Supreme Court decision that said corporations have a First Amendment right to spend unlimited amounts to influence elections.
Coffee Party USA's insight:

It seems a good idea to make Corporations prove their personhood with hard facts about how they are human. They cannot be counted twice. Limits of individual donations should apply to this one person corporation just like other individuals. They are not approved people-hood just a singular personhood.

 

 

Excerpt:

Today, the District of Columbia joined 11 states in calling for a constitutional amendment to get Big Money out of politics by overturning the Citizens United ruling and related cases. Public Citizen applauds the resolution’s sponsor, Councilmember David Grosso, and all members of the Council for unanimously supporting this critical measure for our democracy.

more...
Joseph Pomponio's curator insight, February 8, 2013 6:38 AM

Yet more support is still needed.

Marianne Castiglia's comment, February 12, 2013 11:15 PM
I did not know that the there are 11 states calling for an amendment to overturn CU. My guess is they are all Northeastern states and California? Good job David Grasso.
Scooped by Coffee Party USA from AUSTERITY & OPPRESSION SUPPORTERS VS THE PROGRESSION Of The REST OF US
Scoop.it!

Why We Can’t Shop Our Way to a Better Economy: Stacy Mitchell’s TEDx Talk

Why We Can’t Shop Our Way to a Better Economy: Stacy Mitchell’s TEDx Talk | Coffee Party News | Scoop.it

“As remarkable as these trends are, they are unlikely to amount to more than an small sideshow on the margins of the mainstream if the only way we can conceive of confronting corporate power and bringing about a new economy is through our buying decisions… What we really need to do is change the underlying policies that shape our economy. We can’t do that through the sum of our individual behavior in the marketplace. We can only do it by exercising our collective power as citizens.”


Via jean lievens, Monica S Mcfeeters
Coffee Party USA's insight:

This is very worth the time it takes to listen. A great summary of where we are today.

more...
Rhett Rebold's curator insight, February 5, 2013 12:20 AM

This is very worth the time it takes to listen. A great summary of where we are today.