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Suggested by Greg Russak
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Ever Wondered Why We Call Money in Politics 'Corruption?' Watch This Video.

Ever Wondered Why We Call Money in Politics 'Corruption?' Watch This Video. | Coffee Party News | Scoop.it
Bill Moyers sits down with two special guests for an eyeopening and in depth look at the flow of money and sphere of influence in Washington.

 

Read more and watch the interview at http://daily.represent.us/why-we-call-money-politics-corruption/

 

Coffee Party USA's insight:

If you want money out of politics, then please become a Citizen Co-Sponsor of the American Anti-Corruption Act. Ordinary citizens like you (and me) are gathering digital signatures at our own co-sponsor sites. http://unitedrepublic.actionkit.com/event/cosponsor/9815/


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How to Make Americans Care About Money Corrupting Politics

How to Make Americans Care About Money Corrupting Politics | Coffee Party News | Scoop.it
A walk across New Hampshire showed that citizens don't just hate the current system—they're willing to act. The trick is creating a true grassroots movement.
Coffee Party USA's insight:

LAWRENCE LESSIG JAN 31 2014, 10:41 AM ET

As we started the 185-mile trek from Dixville Notch to Nashua, there were certain things that I knew.

I knew that our system of government had become corrupt. That the system—not necessarily any individuals, but all the individuals together—had been contorted into a shape that makes it impossible for government to address even the most fundamental and important issues sensibly.

I knew this in the way that any academic knows anything: I had studied it, across history and in its current form. I had seen numbers that captured its contours. I had spoken to people who had participated in it, both now and before it had metastasized. I knew it and believed it, and believed passionately that we have to find a way to bring more people into a movement to end it.

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Coffee Party USA's curator insight, February 12, 2014 10:45 PM

LAWRENCE LESSIG JAN 31 2014, 10:41 AM ET

As we started the 185-mile trek from Dixville Notch to Nashua, there were certain things that I knew.

I knew that our system of government had become corrupt. That the system—not necessarily any individuals, but all the individuals together—had been contorted into a shape that makes it impossible for government to address even the most fundamental and important issues sensibly.

I knew this in the way that any academic knows anything: I had studied it, across history and in its current form. I had seen numbers that captured its contours. I had spoken to people who had participated in it, both now and before it had metastasized. I knew it and believed it, and believed passionately that we have to find a way to bring more people into a movement to end it.

[MORE]

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The Government By the People Act | Demos

The Government By the People Act | Demos | Coffee Party News | Scoop.it
American democracy is based upon the fundamental principle of one person, one vote—the simple notion that we are all equal before the law and should have an equal say over the government decisions that affect our lives.
Coffee Party USA's insight:
February 5, 2014
Adam Lioz

American democracy is based upon the fundamental principle of one person, one vote—the simple notion that we are all equal before the law and should have an equal say over the government decisions that affect our lives. But unfortunately our system often more closely resembles one dollar, one vote as wealthy donors enjoy vastly disproportionate influence over who runs for office, who wins elections, and what issues make it onto the agenda in Washington, DC. This threatens the integrity and legitimacy of our democracy, as ordinary citizens come to the justified conclusion that the system is rigged and their voices are being drowned out in a sea of campaign cash.

We must reduce the undue influence of wealthy donors by amplifying the voices of all Americans. The Government By the People Act increases the power of the small contributions that ordinary citizens can afford to give, providing incentives for congressional candidates to reach out to average constituents, not just dial for dollars from wealthy donors. It’s the single best policy we can immediately enact to democratize the influence of money in politics. Though the Supreme Court, in a long line of cases from Buckley v. Valeo to Citizens United v. FEC, has tied the People’s hands, blocking us from enforcing common-sense limits on the use of big money in politics, we remain free to tackle the problem from the other side of the equation—providing incentives to bring more small donors into the system.

The Government By the People Act has four key provisions:

  • Creates the Freedom from Influence Fund to match contributions of up to $150 to participating candidates 6-to-1 or more;

  • Provides a $25 refundable tax credit for small contributions;

  • Provides enhanced matching funds in the final 60 days of a general election for candidates in high-cost races (because of an onslaught of outside spending, for example); and

  • Creates People PACs, or small donor committees, that aggregate the voices and power of ordinary citizens rather than wealthy donors (as traditional PACs tend to do).

We need a government of, by, and for the people, not bought and paid for by wealthy donors. This proposal puts the U.S. Congress back in the hands of ordinary Americans.

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Coffee Party USA's curator insight, February 6, 2014 11:00 PM
February 5, 2014
Adam Lioz

American democracy is based upon the fundamental principle of one person, one vote—the simple notion that we are all equal before the law and should have an equal say over the government decisions that affect our lives. But unfortunately our system often more closely resembles one dollar, one vote as wealthy donors enjoy vastly disproportionate influence over who runs for office, who wins elections, and what issues make it onto the agenda in Washington, DC. This threatens the integrity and legitimacy of our democracy, as ordinary citizens come to the justified conclusion that the system is rigged and their voices are being drowned out in a sea of campaign cash.

We must reduce the undue influence of wealthy donors by amplifying the voices of all Americans. The Government By the People Act increases the power of the small contributions that ordinary citizens can afford to give, providing incentives for congressional candidates to reach out to average constituents, not just dial for dollars from wealthy donors. It’s the single best policy we can immediately enact to democratize the influence of money in politics. Though the Supreme Court, in a long line of cases from Buckley v. Valeo to Citizens United v. FEC, has tied the People’s hands, blocking us from enforcing common-sense limits on the use of big money in politics, we remain free to tackle the problem from the other side of the equation—providing incentives to bring more small donors into the system.

The Government By the People Act has four key provisions:

  • Creates the Freedom from Influence Fund to match contributions of up to $150 to participating candidates 6-to-1 or more;

  • Provides a $25 refundable tax credit for small contributions;

  • Provides enhanced matching funds in the final 60 days of a general election for candidates in high-cost races (because of an onslaught of outside spending, for example); and

  • Creates People PACs, or small donor committees, that aggregate the voices and power of ordinary citizens rather than wealthy donors (as traditional PACs tend to do).

We need a government of, by, and for the people, not bought and paid for by wealthy donors. This proposal puts the U.S. Congress back in the hands of ordinary Americans.

[MORE]

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Players Guide 2014: the people and groups behind the TV ads in the 2014 federal elections

Players Guide 2014: the people and groups behind the TV ads in the 2014 federal elections | Coffee Party News | Scoop.it

Who are the people and groups behind the TV ads in the 2014 federal elections? Below is a list of organizations that have been active or are expected to be active in raising and spending money to influence voters in 2014. Click on the links to read profiles of each organization. The groups were selected based on the amounts they have spent, or say they plan to spend, or the media attention they have attracted. It is not a comprehensive list, and additional groups will be added as the campaign season unfolds.

 

Many of these groups may legally raise and spend unlimited amounts of money. They are known as super PACs and must register with the Federal Election Commission. Others may legally raise unlimited donations and avoid disclosing their donors. Those groups do not file with the FEC, but register rather with the IRS under Section Section 501(c3).[MORE]

Coffee Party USA's insight:

"Can't tell the players without a scorecard!"

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The Case for an Article V. Convention - YouTube

http://www.wolf-pac.com/take_action Lawrence Lessig, along with several MA State Representatives and Wolf PAC volunteers went to the Boston Statehouse to exp...
Coffee Party USA's insight:

MA citizens, along with Lawrence Lessig, appeal to MA state reps to be among the states that lead the effort for an Article V Convention. As one citizen said, "People under estimate the power of their voice and the power in numbers. Hopefully more people will see this and get involved will make the movement better for us."

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, February 9, 2014 11:21 PM

Here is one way to start change.

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Marchers follow in the footsteps of Granny D to promote campaign finance reform

Published Date: Friday, 17 January 2014 04:25

By Daymond Steer

CONWAY — A hearty band of a few dozen souls, on a 185-mile anti-corruption march from Dixville Notch to Nashua, stopped at the Eastern Slope Inn recently to make their case for campaign finance reform.
The march, called the New Hampshire Rebellion, is led by Harvard professor Lawrence Lessig who was inspired by New Hampshire icon and campaign finance reform activist "Granny D." The late Monadnock region resident, Doris Haddock, at the age of 88, famously walked across the country in 1999 to call attention to the issue. In the 2000 presidential primary, then candidate John McCain (R-Arizona) made an issue of corruption and won the state. New Hampshire has the first Presidential Primary and a large block of politically educated and independent voters.

Coffee Party USA's insight:

A well-written and in-depth piece reminiscent of what newspaper journalism once was and ought to be again. Leave it to a small town newspaper reporter to do it well and to get it right.

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