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This is a curated resource for programmers and software architects. It is regularly updated with Articles, Hacks, How Tos, Examples and Code.
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Run Ruby program and compile sources using Notepad++

Run Ruby program and compile sources using Notepad++ | Code it | Scoop.it
In this article I will show you how you can Run Ruby program and compile sources using Notepad++ and how to configure Notepad++ to edit Ruby programs.


Notepad++ is for sure one of the most popular text editing software of the present and in this post I will show you how you can use it to run Ruby program and compile sources. It is preferred by most of the programmers and software & web developers due to an extended use over different platforms and its capability to offer features like syntax highlighting for most programming languages. It can also be configured to run external tools such as Java, Ruby or C++ source files.

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Meet Utilite, new Raspberry Pi rival

Meet Utilite, new Raspberry Pi rival | Code it | Scoop.it

CompuLab's soon-to-be-released inexpensive ARM-powered Utlite PC can run Android or Ubuntu.


Cheap, low-end PCs -- such as the Raspberry Pi and Parallella -- have become quite popular with do-it-yourself fans. Now, CompuLab, an Israeli computer OEM, is throwing its hat into the ring with its $99 Utilite mini-PC, which might also serve businesses well. 

Unlike the $25 bare-bones Raspberry Pi PC, the Utilite will come in a paperback-book sized, 5.3-inch × 3.9-inch × 0.8-inch container.

It also boasts far more processing power. The Utilite, which will start shipping in August, is powered by a Freescale i.MX6 system-on-chip with a single, dual, or quad-core ARM Cortex-A9 processor running up to speeds of 1.2GHz.


This miniature computer can hold up to 4GBs of Double data rate synchronous dynamic random-access memory DDR3 RAM. For storage it can come with up to a 512GB mini-Serial ATA, Solid-State Drive (SSD). The front-panel micro-SD socket supports Secure Digital extended Capacity (SDXC) cards with up to 128GBs of room.


For video output, the Utilite uses High-Definition Multimedia Interface (HDMI) 1.4 and a second Digital Video Interface-Digital (DVI-D) port. Both display outputs support resolutions up to 1920 x 1200 and can be operated in dual-head mode. 5.1 channels audio is available through HDMI and through Sony/Philips Digital Interconnect Format (S/PDIF). In addition there are standard 3.5mm jacks for stereo line-out and line-in.


To connect it with your network and other devices, the Utilite comes with a pair of Gigabit Ethernet ports and built-in 802.11n Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. It includes four USB 2.0 ports: two on the back and two on the front. It also has a mini RS232 connector.


Users will have their choice of Android or Ubuntu Linux for their operating system. CompuLab has experience in delivering Linux-based systems with its Mint-based MintBox line. No further operating system details are available at this time.

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Setting Sublime Text as the Default Editor for Git (Linux Mint/Ubuntu)

Setting Sublime Text as the Default Editor for Git (Linux Mint/Ubuntu) | Code it | Scoop.it

Setting up Sublime Text 2 (or the new Beta Release of version 3)  as the default editor used by Git is not overly challenging, but not necessarily obvious either. Really, we're still simply setting up the .gitconfig file with a path to sublime text. However, given that there is not, presently, a standard installation directory for Sublime Text, we first need to know where to point our .gitconfig file. Also, there are some non-obvious flags which need to be set as part of the configuration, or Sublime Text will not work properly as the Git editor.


Tell Git Where Sublime Text Lives

To set the default editor in our .gitconfig file from the terminal, we can use the following command:

$ git config --global core.editor "subl -n -w"

 

Notice the –n and –w flags at the end? These arguments are passed to Sublime Text, and essentially tell it to run without loading any previously open windows (the –n flag), and to wait until the user exits to pass execution back to the calling process (the –w flag, for "wait"). In this case, the calling process is Git.

Trouble Shooting

If the above doesn't work for you, then you may not have the alias or Bash script in your /usr/bin/ directory, or you may have installed Sublime Text to a different directory altogether. In this case, the command is the same, but you need to change it to include either the script name you chase, or the the full-path to Sublime Text itself:

$ git config --global code.editor "<Full Path or Script> -n -w"

 

Of course, you can always open the .gitconfig file in Sublime Text itself (or any other editor on your system), and edit the file directly, but if you are learning Linux, where's the fun in THAT?

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New Tweets per second record, and how

New Tweets per second record, and how | Code it | Scoop.it

ecently, something remarkable happened on Twitter: On Saturday, August 3 in Japan, people watched an airing ofCastle in the Sky, and at one moment they took to Twitter so much that we hit a one-second peak of 143,199 Tweets per second. (August 2 at 7:21:50 PDT; August 3 at 11:21:50 JST)


To give you some context of how that compares to typical numbers, we normally take in more than 500 million Tweets a day which means about 5,700 Tweets a second, on average. This particular spike was around 25 times greater than our steady state.


During this spike, our users didn’t experience a blip on Twitter. That’s one of our goals: to make sure Twitter is always available no matter what is happening around the world.


This goal felt unattainable three years ago, when the 2010 World Cup put Twitter squarely in the center of a real-time, global conversation. The influx of Tweets –– from every shot on goal, penalty kick and yellow or red card –– repeatedly took its toll and made Twitter unavailable for short periods of time. Engineering worked throughout the nights during this time, desperately trying to find and implement order-of-magnitudes of efficiency gains. Unfortunately, those gains were quickly swamped by Twitter’s rapid growth, and engineering had started to run out of low-hanging fruit to fix.


After that experience, we determined we needed to step back. We then determined we needed to re-architect the site to support the continued growth of Twitter and to keep it running smoothly. Since then we’ve worked hard to make sure that the service is resilient to the world’s impulses. We’re now able to withstand events like Castle in the Sky viewings, the Super Bowl, and the global New Year’s Eve celebration. This re-architecture has not only made the service more resilient when traffic spikes to record highs, but also provides a more flexible platform on which to build more features faster, including synchronizing direct messages across devices, Twitter cards that allow Tweets to become richer and contain more content, and a rich search experience that includes stories and users. And more features are coming.

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PHP exploding on Google App Engine: 'It's amazing, and we didn't anticipate this'

PHP exploding on Google App Engine: 'It's amazing, and we didn't anticipate this' | Code it | Scoop.it

For years, developers asked Google to enable PHP on App Engine. In May, Google finally relented, and the most-requested language for Google App Engine is becoming one of the most popular languages on Google cloud offerings.

 

This makes a lot of sense.

 

After all, with over five million developers, PHP is the most-used language on the web. In addition, according to Google, PHP runs a staggering 75 percent of the web. That made it a no-brainer to add in addition to Python, Google’s language of choice. If Google wants to compete with the big boys of cloud — such as Amazon and Microsoft’s Azure — PHP is a necessity.

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A non-magical introduction to Pip and Virtualenv for Python beginners

One of the hurdles that new Python developers have to get over is understanding the Python packaging ecosystem. This blog post is based on material covered in our Python for Programmers training course, which attempts to explain pip and virtualenv for new Python users.

 pip

Let's dive in. pip is a tool for installing Python packages from the Python Package Index.

 

PyPI (which you'll occasionally see referred to as The Cheeseshop) is a repository for open-source third-party Python packages. It's similar to RubyGems in the Ruby world, PHP's Packagist, CPAN for Perl, and NPM for Node.js.

 

Python actually has another, more primitive, package manager calledeasy_install, which is installed automatically when you install Python itself. pip is vastly superior to easy_install for lots of reasons, and so should generally be used instead.

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Git Turns 8, Sees Wide Adoption in the Enterprise

Git Turns 8, Sees Wide Adoption in the Enterprise | Code it | Scoop.it
Git is being widely adopted in companies for its ability to drive agility and innovation for leading-edge mobile, social and cloud-based applications.

 

More Than 40 Percent Use Git

Originally created by Linux creator Linus Torvalds, Git is a free and open source distributed version control system “designed to handle everything from small to very large projects with speed and efficiency,” in theproject's own words. Not only that, but it's fast and easy to learn, and it offers a diminutive footprint. Written in C, Git was built to work on the Linux kernel and was designed with speed and performance in mind.

 

Today, all the many advantages that have long made the system appealing to independent developers are apparently attracting enterprises as well.

 

This April marks both the eighth anniversary of Git and the fifth anniversary of GitHub, so it should come as no great surprise that the distributed revision control and source code management (SCM) system has been the focus of extra attention this month.

 

Case in point: Enterprise cloud development firm CollabNet recently announced the results of what it calls the first major industry survey on Git adoption in the enterprise. In a nutshell, the survey found that Git is being widely adopted in companies for its ability to drive agility and innovation for leading-edge mobile, social and cloud-based applications.

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Publishing to Azure Web Sites from any git/hg repo

Publishing to Azure Web Sites from any git/hg repo | Code it | Scoop.it

Windows Azure Web Sites provide a nice selection of ways to deploy a site from source code. You can deploy from:

a local git repositorya TFS projecta git project on GitHuba git or Mercurial project on Bitbucketa git or Mercurial project on CodePlexcode in a Dropbox folder

One thing that all these approaches have in common is that you own the code. e.g. in the GitHub case, you must be an admin on the project. The reason is that Azure needs to set up a hook in the project to enable continuous deployment, and only project owners can do that.

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Multithreaded Python Tutorial with the “Threadworms” Demo

Multithreaded Python Tutorial with the “Threadworms” Demo | Code it | Scoop.it

When you run a normal Python program, the program execution starts at the first line and goes down line by line. Loops and function calls may cause the program execution to jump around, but it is fairly easy to see from the code which line will get executed next at any given point. You can put your finger on the first line of code in the .py file on the screen, and then trace through the next lines of code that are executed. This is single-threaded programming.

 

However, using multiple threads is like putting a second finger down on your code. Each finger still moves the same way, but now they are executing code simultaneously.

 

Actually, they aren’t executing simultaneously. Your two fingers are taking turns at which one executes code. Computers with multicore CPUs can actually run multiple instructions simultaneously, but there is a feature of Python programs called the GIL (Global Interpreter Lock) that limits a Python program to one core only.

 

The Python interpreter will run one thread for a while, and then pause it to run another thread for a while. But it does this so fast that it seems like they are running simultaneously.

 

You can start dozens or hundreds of threads in your program (that’s a lot of fingers). This doesn’t automatically make your programs dozens or hundreds of times faster though (all the threads are still sharing the same CPU) but it can make your program more efficient.

 

For example, say you write a function that will download a file full of names, then sorts the names, and then writes these names to a file on your computer. If there are hundreds of files your program needs to process, you would put a call to this function in a loop and it would handle each file serially: download, sort, write, download, sort, write, download, sort, write…

 

Each of these three steps use different resources on your computer:

downloading uses the network connection, sorting uses the CPU, writing the file uses the hard drive. Also, there are tiny pauses within each of these steps. For example, the server you are downloading the file from may be slow and your computer’s Internet connection has bandwidth to spare.

It would be better if you could call this function hundreds of times in parallel by using one thread for each file. Not only would this make better use of your bandwidth, but if some files download sooner than others, the CPU can be used to sort them while the network connection continues to work. This makes more efficient use of your computer.

What makes multithreaded programming tricky?

Of course, in the above case, each thread is doing its own separate thing and doesn’t need to communicate or synchronize anything with the other threads. You could just write the simple single-threaded version of the download-sort-write program and run the program hundreds of times separately. (Though it might be a pain to type & click each time to run the program each with a different file to download.)

 

Many multithreaded programs share access to the same variables, but this is where things can get tricky.

 
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Reflection in PHP

Reflection in PHP | Code it | Scoop.it

Reflection is generally defined as a program’s ability to inspect itself and modify its logic at execution time. In less technical terms, reflection is asking an object to tell you about its properties and methods, and altering those members (even private ones). In this lesson, we’ll dig into how this is accomplished, and when it might prove useful.

 

At the dawn of the age of programming, there was the assembly language. A program written in assembly resides on physical registers inside the computer. Its composition, methods and values could be inspected at any time by reading the registers. Even more, you could alter the program while it was running by simply modifying those registers. It required some intimate knowledge about the running program, but it was inherently reflective.

 

As higher-level programming languages (like C) came along, this reflectivity faded and disappeared. It was later re-introduced with object-oriented programming.

 Today, most programming languages can use reflection. Statically typed languages, such as Java, have little to no problems with reflection. What I find interesting, however, is that any dynamically-typed language (like PHP or Ruby) is heavily based on reflection. Without the concept of reflection, duck-typing would most likely be impossible to implement. When you send one object to another (a parameter, for example), the receiving object has no way of knowing the structure and type of that object. All it can do is use reflection to identify the methods that can and cannot be called on the received object.
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HTML5 - Intel Inside!

HTML5 - Intel Inside! | Code it | Scoop.it

What is Intel up to? It has just released a set of really good HLML5 tools, potentially the best yet, that allows you to create  apps that are platform independent. This raises more questions that it answers. Why is an "Intel Inside" sticker on HTML5 so important?

 

If you are creating or thinking of creating a Web app using JavaScript then you need to know about what Intel is up to. Its latest offering makes it possible, and in fact easy, to create a web app that will work on mobile and desktop devices and then package it for all of the app stores you want to support. If this is as good as it seems to be, it is a winning tool and a way to really make apps that are write once and run everywhere.

 

Intel took the opportunity of launching its revamped developer offering for HTML5 apps at the Intel Developer Forum in Beijing in April. The aim is very high as you can tell from the title of arecent blog post - "One Code Base to Rule Them All". You might think that this is a null claim as HTML5 is standardized, but this is to miss the point that an HTML app running on different platforms has a very different runtime environment. The APIs available in a desktop browser aren't the same as those in an Android Phone and there are even differences between a Chrome and a Firefox packaged app. 

 
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Mozilla Reconsiders, May Support WebP Image Format

Mozilla Reconsiders, May Support WebP Image Format | Code it | Scoop.it
Google's WebP image format promises smaller images and in turn faster web pages, but so far only a few web browsers support it. That would change though if Firefox jumps on the WebP bandwagon.

 

Want your website to load faster? Slim your images. According to the HTTPArchive, images account for roughly 60 percent of total page size. That means the single biggest thing most sites can do to slim down is to shrink their images.

 

We recently covered how you can cut down your website’s page load times using Google’s image-shrinking WebP format. Unfortunately, one of the downsides to WebP is that only Opera and Chrome support it. But that may be about to change — Firefox is reconsidering its decision to reject WebP.

 

The change of heart makes sense since most of the objections Firefox developers initially raised about WebP have since been addressed. However, Firefox hasn’t committed to WebP just yet. As Firefox developer Jeff Muizelaar writes on the re-opened bug report, “just to be clear, no decision on adopting WebP has been made. The only thing that has changed is that we’ve just received some more interest from large non-Google web properties which we never really had before.”

 

Whatever the case, if Firefox does land support for WebP it would help the fledgling format cross the line where more browsers support it than don’t, which tends to be the threshold for wider adoption.

 

If you’d like to experiment with WebP today, while still providing fallbacks for browsers that don’t support it, be sure to check out our earlier write-up.

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Interesting links that predict the future of data storage

Ok, they aren’t like the 2012 nonsense or anything but they are interesting articles that will be important topics in the near future for expanding our knowledge and usefulness in the job market. Being a DBA does not limit you to relational database systems. I expect to see more requests for non-relational or No-SQL type of data stores as they can have many advantages over an RDBMS. Stability, scalability, simplification of administration, higher performance on lesser hardware for larger datasets, and many other items make no-sql engines very interesting. Here are some useful links:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NoSQL

 

http://www.linux-mag.com/cache/7579/1.html

 

http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9135086/No_to_SQL_Anti_database_movement_gains_steam_

 

http://www.viget.com/extend/nosql-misconceptions/

 

How can I pass up talking about the various Cloud offerings again. Here are some interesting news stories and a shameless link to the cloud service

that my employer runs.

 

http://aws.typepad.com/aws/2009/10/two-new-ec2-instance-types-additional-memory.html

 

http://www.opsourcecloud.net/

 

http://virtualization.sys-con.com/node/770174

 

This is not related to no-sql or the cloud but I’m going to post it anyway:

 

http://www.continuent.com/community/all-projects

 
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Coder for Raspberry Pi

Coder for Raspberry Pi | Code it | Scoop.it

Coder is a free, open source project that turns a Raspberry Pi into a simple platform that educators and parents can use to teach the basics of building for the web. New coders can craft small projects in HTML, CSS, and Javascript, right from the web browser.


Getting to Know Coder.

Coder is designed for creating, editing, and running simple web apps. Coder apps are built using the standard building blocks of the web (HTML, CSS, and Javascript), and they can be crafted directly in your web browser. 


Your Coder's landing page contains all of your apps, organized by most recent. You can create new apps by clicking the Green '+' app in the top left. The gear in the top right opens your Coder's settings where you can change things like your name, password, wireless settings, and more.

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Imperva calls for removal of PHP 'SuperGlobal' feature

Imperva calls for removal of PHP 'SuperGlobal' feature | Code it | Scoop.it
Although the security concerns are now over two years old, Imperva has called for the removal of one of PHP's features that could allow attackers to take over servers.


Research company Imperva is calling for the removal of a feature in PHP, citing that it opens the door for attackers to turn servers across the globe into their own botnet army.


In a report (PDF), the company takes particular issue with the use of PHP's "SuperGlobal" parameters and how they can be abused.

The vulnerability described in the report is not particularly new, and requires chaining together vulnerabilities CVE-2011-2505 and CVE-2010-3065 in order to execute arbitrary code on a server, with CVE-2011-2505 first disclosed in July 2011 and CVE-2010-3065 in August 2010.

Combined, they allow attackers to modify the SESSION SuperGlobal variable, and write data to a local file on the server. This file will be later parsed and executed by PhpMyAdmin, a popular web-based tool used to manage MySQL databases, allowing the attacker to execute any code they wish.


However, the company considers the use of SuperGlobal parameters, which enable both vulnerabilities, to be overpowered, and is advocating for their removal.


"SuperGlobal parameters in requests should be blocked — since there is no reason for these parameters to be present in requests, they should be banned," the report says.

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New Chrome Apps take the Web out of the browser

New Chrome Apps take the Web out of the browser | Code it | Scoop.it

Five years after it shook up the Web with its unexpected debut, Chrome gambles again as it takes the Web offline with its new 'packaged apps.' 


What's a Chrome App?


"This is the way to deliver native apps for Chrome OS," said Erik Kay, Chrome's engineering director who's worked on the browser since before it launched.


Some of the more notable apps that are available include Pixlr Touch Up for lightweight photo editing; Wunderlist and Google Keep for to-do list management; and games like Spelunky and Tank Riders


In many ways, Kay explained, the new apps are a mashup between native code and browser development.


The new apps are available offline, have access to lower-level system resources such as Bluetooth and USB, and can interact with digital cameras and other peripherals, which Web sites can't really do yet. The apps auto-update and leverage Chrome's sandboxing for security, offer syncing and in-app payments like cloud apps and mobile apps, and can display desktop notifications.

But developers are freed from the design constraints imposed by the browser, said Kay.


"[A Chrome App] has full control over its appearance, down to how it interacts with the system," he said. That means that developers aren't dependent on the browser's chrome, its interface, for how the app looks, and can develop apps that look more like mobile apps.

.

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The top 10 cloud-based tools for developers

The top 10 cloud-based tools for developers | Code it | Scoop.it

Nothing is hotter right now than developer tools.

 

More individuals are learning to code, and companies are hiring the best of them to build new cloud and mobile apps. Hackers and investors alike are beginning to figure out that whoever makes the best tools stands to make a huge amount of money.

 

With this list, we’ll name and keep track of 10 cloud-based, XaaS (everything as a service) companies that boast not only innovative products but also market momentum, cross-platform capabilities, and a forward-looking vision.

 

These might not be the most popular, most commonly used services — heck, some of these names might be totally new to you. But that’s part of what VentureBeat does: We try to bring you new tools to try out before they blow up and become hugely popular.

 

Google Cloud PlaygroundNew RelicAdobe Edge & Creative CloudParseGitHubHerokuMicrosoft AzureJoyentKinveyUrban Airship
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WebRTC, Online Code Editor Team Up for Real-Time Coding

WebRTC, Online Code Editor Team Up for Real-Time Coding | Code it | Scoop.it

WebRTC is a proposed standard — currently being refined by the W3C — with the goal of providing a web-based set of tools that any device can use to share audio, video and data in real time. It’s still in the early stages, but WebRTC has the potential to supplant Skype, Flash and many native apps with web-based alternatives that work on any device.

 

It’s still going to be some time before WebRTC technology starts to deliver cool apps, but even today developers are quickly moving from the realm of cool WebRTC experiments, like the Mozilla/Google phone call demo, to useful apps like Codassium.

 

 
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Windows 8 Store Application (#WinRT) Development Tutorial for #Win8Dev

Windows 8 Store Application (#WinRT) Development Tutorial for #Win8Dev | Code it | Scoop.it

Windows 8 introduced a new type of application set named “Windows 8 Store app” which has a new look & feel (earlier named as “Metro UI”). Developers can host & sell these WinRT apps from Windows Store, a new digital platform from Microsoft. Windows Store will allow both free and paid applications where the ranges may vary from $1.49 to $999.99 in case of paid version. 

If you are a Visual C#, Visual Basic, Visual C++ and/or JavaScript application developer, you can build applications for Windows 8 Store using any one of those languages. I have started building a Tutorial series on WinRT (Windows 8 Store) application development using Visual C#, XAML templates. 

Based on readers feedback, I built this page listing all the chapters of this tutorial series and will continue updating this page with the coming chapters of the tutorial. Start learning this new technology and build applications for Windows Store. 

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Experimental CSS Shaders Bring Photoshop Filters to the Web

Experimental CSS Shaders Bring Photoshop Filters to the Web | Code it | Scoop.it

Chrome’s experimental Canary channel and Safari’s WebKit nightly builds both now support all of the Photoshop-inspired blend modes for CSS Shaders, part of Adobe’s effort to bring Photoshop-style filter tools to the web.

 

To see the new blend modes in action, grab a copy of the latest Chrome Canary or WebKit nightly builds, enable the CSS Shaders option in about:flags and point your browser to Adobe’s sample code over on Codepen. Previously, CSS Shaders required a special build of WebKit [Update: As Adobe's Alan Greenblatt points out in the comments, CSS shader support has been in Chrome stable since v25 (you still need to enable the flag). But if you want to play around with these new blend modes then you'll need Canary (or a WebKit nightly).]

The new blend mode support is part of Adobe’s CSS Shaders proposal, which recently became part of the W3C’s CSS Filter Effects specification. There are two types of shaders in the spec, CSS fragment shaders, which provide features similar to what Photoshop’s blending modes offer, and CSS vertex shaders, which handle the 3D animation filters we’ve showcased in the past.

The blending modes currently available include all the familiar options you’ll find in Adobe Photoshop, such as multiply, screen, overlay, luminosity and other photographer favorites.

For more details and links to the corresponding specs, be sure to check out this post from Max Vujovic, who is working on the CSS Filters implementation in WebKit and Blink.

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Web's Most Popular JavaScript Library Drops Support for Older Versions of IE

Web's Most Popular JavaScript Library Drops Support for Older Versions of IE | Code it | Scoop.it

The popular jQuery JavaScript library has hit a major milestone with the release of jQuery 2.0. The 2.0 release is some 12 percent smaller than its predecessor, but the big news is that jQuery 2.0 drops support for Internet Explorer 6, 7 and 8.

 

Created to simplify the process of writing JavaScript and manipulating HTML, jQuery began life a mere seven years ago, but quickly found favor with developers sick of dealing with cross-browser JavaScript hassles. According to onesurvey published last year, jQuery turns up on roughly half of all sites on the web.

 

Will dropping support for older versions of IE change that? Probably not. If your site needs to maintain support for IE 8 and below (or even IE 9 and 10 running in compatibility mode) you’ll just need to stick with jQuery 1.9 or below.

 

“jQuery 2.0 is intended for the modern web,” writes jQuery’s Dave Methvin on the Query Foundation website. “We’ve got jQuery 1.x to handle older browsers and fully expect to support it for several more years.”

 

If you want the best of both worlds you can use a conditional comment to serve 2.0 to newer browsers and 1.9 to older ones, but the far easier way to go is sticking with jQuery 1.x. For now at least the primary use case for the 2.0 line is situations where IE support isn’t a consideration — think Chrome or Firefox add-ons, PhoneGap apps or node.js.

 
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What is probabilistic programming?

What is probabilistic programming? | Code it | Scoop.it

A probabilistic programming language is a high-level language that makes it easy for a developer to define probability models and then “solve” these models automatically. These languages incorporate random events as primitives and their runtime environment handles inference. Now, it is a matter of programming that enables a clean separation between modeling and inference. This can vastly reduce the time and effort associated with implementing new models and understanding data. Just as high-level programming languages transformed developer productivity by abstracting away the details of the processor and memory architecture, probabilistic languages promise to free the developer from the complexities of high-performance probabilistic inference.

 
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Mozilla: WebRTC is the Real Future of Communications

Mozilla: WebRTC is the Real Future of Communications | Code it | Scoop.it

The first release of Firefox with support for WebRTC is right around the corner and Mozilla is encouraging web developers to go ahead and start experimenting with what Mozilla refers to as “the real future of communications.”

 

WebRTC is a proposed standard — currently being refined by the W3C — with the goal of providing a web-based set of tools that any device can use to share audio, video and data in real time. It’s still in the early stages, but WebRTC has the potential to supplant Skype, Flash and many device-native apps with web-based alternatives that work in your browser.

 

WebRTC support is already baked into Firefox for Android. Both the getUserMedia API and the PeerConnection API — key components of WebRTC and the cornerstones of web-based voice chat — are already supported though you’ll need to enable them in the preferences. See theMozilla hacks blog for more details.

 
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Hack your Android like a pro: Rooting and ROMs explained

Hack your Android like a pro: Rooting and ROMs explained | Code it | Scoop.it

There are benefits to rooting your Android smartphone, but it can be a tricky world for beginners. Here are some tips.

 

For all of the flexibility and customization that comes with an Android device, there are still plenty of restrictions in place. While Android technically is an open-source platform, the final product is still the result of a phone maker's skin, the carrier or manufacturer's preloaded software, or even sometimes, a few disabled features.

 

There isn't anything wrong with most out-of-the-box experiences, but more daring and tech-savvy users who tire of being at the mercy and discretion of carriers and handset makers might be interested in pushing theirAndroid devices to new limits. This where the practice known as rooting comes into play.

 What is rooting?Rooting, in a nutshell, is the process that provides users with full administrator control and access to an Android smartphone or tablet. Similar to "jailbreaking" an iOS device, this is often done in order to bypass carrier or handset maker limitations or restrictions. Once you achieve "root access," you can replace or alter applications and system settings, run specialized apps, and more.

 

One of the more common reasons to root a phone is to replace the operating system with a ROM, another developer's version of the OS that also gives you more control over details. In rooting culture, we'd call that "flashing a custom ROM."

The process of rooting an Android phone varies for each device, but seems to have been streamlined over time. Google's Nexus line of phones, such as the LG-made Nexus 4, appeals to developers and techie types and are among the most often rooted models. With that in mind, you'll also find that popular devices like the Samsung Galaxy S3 and HTC One X+ have plenty of custom ROMs to choose from.

Note that rooting will void the device warranty; however, flashing a stock ROM can revert things back to their original state.

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Create a Web Database

Create a Web Database | Code it | Scoop.it

TinyWebDB is an App Inventor component that allows you to access the web from an Android app. You can use TinyWebDB to access a data source (API) or to store the app’s  data persistently in a web database.

 

These notes show you how to do the latter– set up a web database, and set it up in the cloud using Google’s free App Engine service. With the sample code provided here, you can set up a web database that lives on Google’s servers in just minutes, and you need not be a programmer to do so.

 

Note that App Inventor also provides a TinyDB component. TinyDB stores data directly on the phone and is simpler to use.  TinyWebDB is required only if data needs to be shared between phones and apps (e.g., social apps, multi-player games).

 

By default, the TinyWebDB component stores data on a test service provided by App Inventor, http://appinvtinywebdb.appspot.com/. This service is helpful for testing, but it is shared by all App Inventor users, and it has a limit of 1000 entries. If you use it, your data will be overwritten eventually.

For anything other than tests, you’ll want to create a custom web service that isn’t shared with other App Inventor apps and programmers. You need not be a programmer to do so– just follow the instructions below and you’ll have your own service within minutes.

 
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