Coastal Restoration
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Composite Then and Now Photos of the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake

Composite Then and Now Photos of the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it

"Since 2010, San Francisco photographer Shawn Clover has been working on a striking series of then and now composite photos of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. To create the series, Clover collected archival photos of the earthquake’s aftermath. He then replicated the photos himself, down to the location, camera position and focal length (to the best of his estimation). The resulting composite photos hauntingly combine stark images of the earthquake’s devastation with modern scenes of life in San Francisco."

 


Via Seth Dixon
PIRatE Lab's insight:

We are nearly at the 20th Anniversary of the Northridge Earthquake here in L.A.  I suspect we will see many such "then and now" stories over the next week.  But the most striking examples come from the coastal quake in 1906 which in almost every dimension rewrote the story of San Francisco (and much of California).

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Coastal Restoration
Coastal management and restoration of our planet's coastlines with a particular focus on California and Louisiana.  Emphasizing wetland restoration, aspects of agriculture in the coastal plain, fisheries, dealing with coastal hazards, and effective governance.
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World's largest, most energy efficient container ship launched

World's largest, most energy efficient container ship launched | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
ontrolling fuel consumption to reflect the vessel’s current speed and the sea conditions. As a result, the containership will burn 20 per cent less fuel per TEU in comparison to a reference 10,000 TEU containership.
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Watch: World's Deepest Fish Lurks 5 Miles Down in Mariana Trench

Video footage shows a delicate, transparent animal with a doglike head more than five miles down.
PIRatE Lab's insight:

New snailfish is getting ton of press...even though no samples were taken.

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West Coast Data Portal

West Coast Data Portal | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it

The West Coast Governors Alliance on Ocean Health is pleased to announce new data and tools available via the West Coast Ocean Data Portal to assist coastal managers and stakeholders to view and explore geospatial data about marine debris cleanup and prevention efforts in our region’s coastal waterways.

PIRatE Lab's insight:

Lots of good stuff here.  Enjoy exploring!

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Waters Warm, and Cod Catch Ebbs in Maine

Waters Warm, and Cod Catch Ebbs in Maine | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
The Gulf of Maine’s waters are warming — faster than almost any ocean waters on earth, scientists say — and fish are voting with their fins for cooler places to live.
PIRatE Lab's insight:

Current Round-Up of the issues related to fisheries in New England.

 

See also OceanAdapt's Website for tracking fish populations as the climate changes: As the oceans warm, fish populations are on the move. A new online database that tracks their movements should help fishermen and fishery managers to adapt. http://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/stories/2014/12/oceanadapt_trackingfish.html

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The Pilots: Steering Ships the Size of Skyscrapers — Cargoland — KCRW

The Pilots: Steering Ships the Size of Skyscrapers — Cargoland — KCRW | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
As ships get bigger, a pilot’s job gets more difficult.
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Storm to bring more rain, but less intense

Storm to bring more rain, but less intense | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
With more rain headed to the county, officials said Monday that a stretch of the Pacific Coast Highway closed since Friday's storm probably won't reopen for three to four weeks.

 

The closure runs from Las Posas Road in Camarillo to Yerba Buena Road near Malibu. Mud and debris slid across the highway in several spots, pushing concrete barriers 70 feet across the road. 

Debris must be cleared and hauled out of the area, and several shoulder sections also must be repaired, officials said.

PIRatE Lab's insight:

Wow.  The impacts to PCH were much more severe than I was led to believe.  Yet another coastal management challenge; all of this stemmed from the 2013 Camarillo Springs Fire and subsequent drought which has kept this region revegetated for ~2 years.

 

See also:

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-portion-of-pch-to-be-closed-20141215-story.html

 

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-near-death-experience-on-pch-20141212-story.html

 

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Rescooped by PIRatE Lab from Aquaculture and Fisheries - World Briefing
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21st Century Catch - Toolkit

The toolkit has been developed for anyone interested in how sea fishing is valued on the economic, social, cultural and environmental, or anyone interested in the role of sea fishing in the development of sustainable communities.

Via Αλιεία alieia.info
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Hollywood sign access remains a battle between competing interests

Hollywood sign access remains a battle between competing interests | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
Way back in March, the Beachwood Canyon trail that leads to the Hollywood sign was temporarily closed so the city could install a new security gate.
PIRatE Lab's insight:

Another classic public access issue here in SoCal.

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Paul Greenberg - So Much Ocean, So Little Domestic Fish

Paul Greenberg - So Much Ocean, So Little Domestic Fish | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
For Author Paul Greenberg So much Ocean, so Little Domestic Fish
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Serge @ FARNET.'s curator insight, December 8, 3:40 AM

"the importance of educating chefs(..)beyond traditional fish." Paul,come to #àlOstendaise! @NorthSeaChefs @provinciewvl #BE @4fishgreenberg

Rescooped by PIRatE Lab from Now is the Time to Help our Oceans & it's Species !
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China's New Great Wall Threatens One Quarter of World's Shorebirds

China's New Great Wall Threatens One Quarter of World's Shorebirds | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
Every spring, tens of thousands of plump, russet-breasted shorebirds drop down onto the wetlands of China’s Bohai Bay, ravenous after traveling 3,000 miles from Australia. This Yellow Sea stopover ...

Via Marian Locksley
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Is Sustainable-Labeled Seafood Really Sustainable?

Is Sustainable-Labeled Seafood Really Sustainable? | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
Industry demand for the "sustainable seafood" label, issued by the Marine Stewardship Council, is increasing. But some environmentalists fear fisheries are being certified despite evidence showing that the fish population is in trouble — or when there's not enough information to know the impact on the oceans.
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Martin Litton dies at 97; passionate wilderness conservationist

Martin Litton dies at 97; passionate wilderness conservationist | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
As a boy growing up in the 1920s, when California's population was less than 5 million, Martin Litton would hike cross-country from his Inglewood home to the beach. Sometimes he accompanied his veterinarian father on his rounds to the ranch that later became Los Angeles International Airport .
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Northern California counties exit fire season; SoCal gets no relief

Northern California counties exit fire season; SoCal gets no relief | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
Recent rain and winter weather have eased the wildfire dangers enough that state officials will declare the end of the fire season Monday for three Northern California counties.
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Ethical furs handmade from roadkill

Ethical furs handmade from roadkill | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
Millions of animals are accidentally killed on US roads every year. Here's how one company is turning these sad statistics into something useful, beautiful and respectful.
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NASA Just Emailed A Wrench To The International Space Station | IFLScience

NASA Just Emailed A Wrench To The International Space Station | IFLScience | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
For the first time ever, hardware designed on the ground has been emailed to space to meet the needs of an astronaut. From a computer in California, Mike Chen of Made In Space and colleagues just 3D-printed a ratcheting socket wrench on the International Space Station.
PIRatE Lab's insight:

More and more fun with 3D Printers.

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Agreement reached in Malibu beach access dispute

Agreement reached in Malibu beach access dispute | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
In a victory for public beach access, the owner of Paradise Cove in Malibu has agreed to stop charging a $20 walk-in fee, to remove all signs banning surfing and to unlock a gate to the pier, the California Coastal Commission and the State Lands Commission said Thursday.
PIRatE Lab's insight:

This is huge.  The intimidation of the staff, general lack of caring about public access, and inability to get a response from the management regarding such issues has made this site a very hard nut to crack in terms of public access and an elite enclave that clearly tries hard to keep non-wealthy folks away.

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Obama protects Alaska's Bristol Bay from oil and gas drilling

Obama protects Alaska's Bristol Bay from oil and gas drilling | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it

In a boon to commercial fishermen, conservationists and Native Alaskans, President Obama on Tuesday withdrew the waters of Alaska’s Bristol Bay from oil and gas development, vowing to protect the world’s biggest sockeye salmon fishery.


Calling the region “one of America’s greatest natural resources and a massive economic engine, not only for Alaska but for America,” Obama said he was taking it “off the bidder’s block” and would “make sure that it is preserved into the future.”

  
PIRatE Lab's insight:

See also: http://www.adn.com/article/20141216/president-obama-declares-waters-and-near-bristol-bay-limits-oil-and-gas-leasing

 

 

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California King Tides Project

California King Tides Project | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it

The California King Tides Project help people visualize how sea level rise will impact their lives.  Via smartphones and social media, we invite you to document “king tides” – the highest high tides of today, which will be the average water levels of the future.  The pictures that you take help scientists and managers better plan for future flood risks, and give you a way to participate directly in the science that will drive decisions in your community.  Everyone is welcome to participate!


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Rescooped by PIRatE Lab from Aquaculture and Fisheries - World Briefing
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Conflict threatens to close U.S.'s Bering Sea halibut fishery

Conflict threatens to close U.S.'s Bering Sea halibut fishery | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it

A struggle in Alaska over shrinking supplies of halibut is threatening the iconic centerpiece fish in favor of cheaper exports, fast-food fillets and fish sticks. 

 

If expected cuts are made in January, halibut fishing could be over in the Bering Sea west of Alaska, the source of one-sixth of halibut caught in the United States. That catch includes most of the frozen supply that sustains restaurants, food-service companies and retail stores nationwide, such as Costco and Whole Foods.

 

“The problem is we are running out of rope. We have one more move: We can close the (Bering Sea) fishery,” said Bob Alverson, head of a Seattle-based fishing trade association and a U.S. representative to the International Pacific Halibut Commission, which sets limits on halibut fishing. “That’s going to be devastating if we have to do that.”

 

Those likely to suffer include fishing crews from Alaska to Oregon and vessel owners who invested in the halibut haul after it was privatized in 1995 in a failed bid to stabilize the fish stock. Perhaps more severely threatened are Aleut villages of western Alaska that rely on halibut for both cash and sustenance.

 

The trouble stems from more than a decade of declines in halibut stocks targeted by fishing vessels that use long lines of baited hooks to reel in the popular fish.

 

Pitted against the hook-and-line halibut fleet are 16 Bering Sea trawlers -- controlled by five Washington-based companies -- that scoop up sole, flounder and cod in nets mostly for export. Their nets also inadvertently kill halibut. The same goes for boats from America’s largest single fishery, the pollock that ends up in Filet-O-Fish sandwiches, fish sticks and fake crab for sushi. McDonald’s, Subway, Long John Silver’s, Gorton’s -- all are dependent on the pollock. 

 

By the numbers, it’s a huge mismatch. The trawl boats, some as long as a football field, net 3.3 billion pounds annually and feed consumers around the globe. The smaller halibut boats return to dock with just 4.4 million pounds of fish. But that fish is sold mostly in North America and fetches far more, pound for pound, at the fish counter. It’s also a favorite of American diners.

 

“It’s unusual to have that big steaky fish. It’s got that texture and the bright white meat and no bones, and all of those things that make halibut popular with people,” said Tyson Fick, communications director at the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute.

 

But landing that big steak-like fish and bringing it to American consumers is getting complicated.

 

Competing fleets

 

By law, only halibut caught by hook and line can be sold to consumers. Trawl boats are allowed to kill a certain amount of halibut in their nets as accidental catch, but except for a small amount funneled to food banks, those halibut must be thrown overboard.

 

The bargain struck on Americans’ behalf is that the trawlers net a seafood bounty that consumers can buy cheaply, or companies can export. In exchange, the massive net-fishers are allowed to throw back an amount of expensive halibut that is minuscule compared to the trawlers’ catch -- but huge for the halibut fleet. Meanwhile, the hook-and-line vessels supply the U.S. halibut market.

 

The system worked well when halibut was abundant. Now the fish is in steep decline and there is evidence that trawl boats are part of the problem. Temperature changes and past overfishing by hook-and-line boats are factors, too. But what’s clear is that since the catch was divided into private “shares” in 1995, an effort designed to make halibut fishing more sustainable, the amount of halibut scientists say is safe to harvest has fallen from 58 million pounds a year to a little more than one-quarter that amount.

 

Large cutbacks in hook-and-line halibut fishing started in 2003. By 2012, the amount of halibut killed by the big trawlers -- known as “bycatch” -- began to outstrip the amount actually brought to shore by the smaller halibut boats. The cod, sole and flounder boats are chiefly responsible. At least 10 percent of bycatch is the fault of the pollock industry.

 

Now the International Pacific Halibut Commission, a U.S.-Canada board, is poised to cut the halibut catch by 70 percent in January to control the stock’s freefall. It’s a stopgap measure. The commission doesn’t have the authority to regulate the trawl boats.

 

If the commission again reduces hook-and-line fishers’ catch, that would likely end halibut fishing in the Bering Sea. The reason: The allowable catch would be worth less than the cost to go to sea and bring it back.

 

The Bering Sea halibut take is 16 percent of all U.S. halibut landings, but it’s a crucial slice. Because of accidents of history and geography, the Bering Sea fleet produces most of the frozen halibut that provide a year-round supply for high-end restaurants and retailers who thaw their supply. 

 

A closure could also drive prices even higher for fresh halibut from the other two U.S. sources, the Gulf of Alaska and the Pacific Ocean. Already halibut is one of the most costly items in the seafood case, sometimes hitting $28 a pound.

 

Voluntary regulation

 

It wasn’t supposed to be this way. Keeping halibut on the menu and halibut boats on the water is the job of two government agencies, the U.S.-Canada International Pacific Halibut Commission and an American panel, the North Pacific Fishery Management Council.

 

When the international commission earlier this year slashed the halibut boats’ catch by one-third in the Bering Sea, it was counting on the American council, which regulates trawlers, to reduce the trawling boats’ allowable bycatch by the same amount.

 

That didn’t happen. The council instead has called for voluntary cutbacks. Some council members argue voluntary measures get results faster in an environment where the pace of rule-making can be slow. But the American council typically avoids curtailing trawlers, reasoning that it makes no sense to reduce the pollock, cod, sole and flounder fisheries that are so economically valuable to protect the comparatively tiny landings of halibut and other smaller fisheries.

 

 

A voting majority of the federal appointees serving on the American council tend to side with the trawl industry. Council service requires experience that draws much of its membership from the seafood industry, where trawlers are the bigger players.

 

Trawlers’ representatives have said that they should not pay the price for the past mistakes of the international halibut commission, which previously allowed overharvesting.

 

There is one public official who at least theoretically should be trying to bridge the gap and solve the problem -- but he’s been mum on the issue.

Jim Balsiger, administrator for the Alaska Region of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, serves on both the U.S. council and the Canada-U.S. halibut commission. He recused himself from voting and from discussion on halibut bycatch in October, citing conflicts of interest. His wife, Heather McCarty, is a lobbyist active in trawl issues and those facing St. Paul, a halibut-fishing community in the Pribilof Islands in the Bering Sea.

 

Balsiger could not be reached for comment.

 

One option to settle the dispute, according to Duncan Fields, a member of the American council, is to do away with the rule mandating that halibut be caught by hook and line.

 

“It simply doesn’t make sense to have a law or a rule that every halibut that comes over the side of a trawl vessel is waste,” Fields said. “The American consumer doesn’t know or care that the halibut is caught by a longliner or a trawl boat ... It’s poor public policy ... to throw away about 8 million pounds of halibut” each year.

 

Whatever new rules emerge, Fields argues, should acknowledge that halibut has become an iconic fish in America, and one in far greater demand by the American public than the cod, sole and flounder that account for more than half the halibut killed in the trawl fishery.

As it stands, “We are exchanging something of great demand in the American public for a fish that is primarily exported and has little or no demand in America,” Fields said.

 

Rippling effects

 

What will happen if the international halibut commission goes ahead with further reductions in January, as expected?

 

The halibut fleet could perhaps fish other species. Consumers could buy pollock or cod or some other white fish. But the small boat fishermen of Western Alaska -- mostly Aleut Natives -- would struggle mightily. Some are based in communities whose economies turn entirely on seafood, with halibut and crab dominating the winter fishing months. Community leaders in St. Paul, for example, have said that the unemployment stemming from an end to halibut fishing would fuel social problems, and that many fishermen will face bankruptcy if they can’t return to the sea within a few seasons.

 

Ending hook-and-line fishing of halibut in the Bering Sea also would sever the cultural ties between small-boat and small-community fishers and a fish that has had a long history in Western Alaska. Aleut Natives, who harvest halibut for subsistence while fishing commercially, would face an unknown future.

 

The same can be said for the halibut fleet.

 

“Shutting down a big-money fishery like pollock to save a few halibut is just not going to happen," said Per Odegaard, president of the Fishing Vessel Owners Association, a trade group based in Seattle. “The contributions, the lobbying and stuff, it's kind of a David and Goliath thing.”

 

The North Pacific Fisheries Management Council is meeting this week in Anchorage.

 

If you have experience with or information about the halibut fishery or the North Pacific Fishery Management Council, email lee@invw.org. InvestigateWest is a nonprofit investigative newsroom for the Pacific Northwest.

 

Lee Van Der Voo

 

www.adn.com/

 

 


Via Αλιεία alieia.info
PIRatE Lab's insight:

A great example of the struggles we have in managing stocks when many players are involved and when those include larger, more industrial-sized harvesters and smaller scale narrowly-targeted fishers..

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'Capping' freeways may be a way to provide more open space in L.A.

'Capping' freeways may be a way to provide more open space in L.A. | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
As cities become more dense, finding new open space is proving a difficult task.
PIRatE Lab's insight:

The idea of un-cutting sections of city fragmented by freeways is intriguing.  We might have asked why this wasn't done in the first place, but that would take us down a long and winding road.

 

Of the proposals that would seem to me to produce the most benefits, the Santa Monica proposal and the downtown LA proposal would seem to have the most bang for their buck.

 

Here is a link to the downtown (conceptual) proposal:

 

http://park101.org

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Annual Review of Wild Salmon Fisheries Published

Annual Review of Wild Salmon Fisheries Published | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it

Half of fish come from ‘well or reasonably’ managed fisheries, the other half from fisheries that need ‘significant improvements’.

 

Sustainable Fisheries Partnership (SFP) today released its annual review of the state of wild salmon fisheries. The analysis covers 82 principal Pacific salmon fisheries that target five species (pink, chum, sockeye, coho, and Chinook salmon) across the North Pacific and account for 95% of the global wild-capture commercial salmon harvest.

 

The fisheries are rated as either category A, B or C depending on the quality of the management and the status of the stock. An ‘A’ fishery is considered ‘very well managed’ while a ‘B’ category fishery is considered to be ‘reasonably well managed’. A category ‘C’ fishery is considered to be poorly managed and in need of significant improvements. The report concludes that: - 52% of the total volume of Pacific salmon comes from well or reasonably managed fisheries (Categories A and B).  This includes 99% of coho, 87% of sockeye, 60% of pink, 48% of Chinook, and 23% of chum salmon global harvest.
 

 

- 48% of the total volume of Pacific salmon comes from fisheries in need of significant improvements (Category C). 22% is accounted for by Russian fisheries with illegal fishing issues; 13% by Japanese chum fisheries with hatchery issues; and 10% by Prince William Sound, Alaska, fisheries with hatchery issues.
 

 

- 74% of Alaskan, 95% of British Columbian, and 47% of Russian salmon harvest volumes come from well or reasonably managed fisheries. 
 

 

- All of the Pacific Northwest US and Japanese fisheries included in this report need significant improvements.
 

 

- In 2013–2014, the salmon sector exhibited increased engagement in the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) program. Over half (50.3%) of global supply now comes from fisheries either certified by or under full assessment by MSC.
 

 

- Scoring of Category C fisheries indicated four priority areas where improvements are needed: (1) illegal fishing, (2) hatcheries, (3) harvest control practices for depleted stocks, and (4) offshore fisheries.

 

The report is available here: http://cmsdevelopment.sustainablefish.org.s3.amazonaws.com/2014/12/04/Pacific_Salmon_SFP_Sector_Report_2014_dec01-ea8f0079.pdf All fishery profiles can be found at www.fishsource.com   Pacific Salmon: SFP Fisheries Sustainability Overview 2014 Contact: Blake Lee-Harwood (UK time zone), blake.lee-harwood@sustainablefish.org, +44 7872621071Lani Asato (US West Coast), lani.asato@sustainablefish.org, 1+ (760)271-1545  


Via Αλιεία alieia.info
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More seafood, menu revamp isn't helping Red Lobster | Seafood International

More seafood, menu revamp isn't helping Red Lobster | Seafood International | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
UK market research company finds that making its menu 85% fish and shellfish isn't soaring sales -- yet.
PIRatE Lab's insight:

More seafood has not translated into more profits.

 

It may be one of the more headline-grabbing declines, but Red Lobster isn't alone in declining sales for seafood restaurants.

The numbers seem bleak: According to NPD Group Restaurant Industry Analyst Bonnie Riggs, "seafood restaurants in general are really struggling and they have been for a long time." Firstly, they're based on an older consumer and secondly, price points come into play, Riggs told Seafood International earlier this year. The average per-person check for casual dining seafood is $19.28, versus $13.80 at a non-seafood-based casual dining restaurant. For quick-service restaurants, it's $13.56 versus $8.35.

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Earth Touch, 5 Years Out, Did We Answer The Challenge

Earth Touch, 5 Years Out, Did We Answer The Challenge | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
A powerful, moving narrative published in 2009 depicts a future world without coral reefs by 2050. Did the message fall on deaf ears?
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MPA Collaborative Workshop 2014

MPA Collaborative Workshop 2014 | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it

Fourteen Collaboratives associated with different areas of the coast and made up of a broad range of citizens from different ocean user groups are supporting effective MPA network management. This workshop brings together Collaborative leaders for two half-days of learning and sharing with agency representatives from the Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Fish and Game Commission, the Department of Parks and Recreation and the Ocean Protection Council (OPC).

PIRatE Lab's insight:

This recent workshop by the Ocean Protection Council was designed to help come to some agreement on cross-collaboration, etc. between MPA units across the California coast.

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Catch and Deceased?

Catch and Deceased? | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
What percentage of all the marine life caught by industrial fishing operations ends up on our plate? Ninety percent? Seventy-five? Fifty? Not even close…

Via CSUCI Student
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