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3 Key Leadership Tips From Twitter CEO Dick Costolo

3 Key Leadership Tips From Twitter CEO Dick Costolo | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Here are some of Costolo's tips for successful leadership as he guides Twitter toward a possible entrance onto Wall Street.


Via Karin Sebelin
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Karin Sebelin's curator insight, September 11, 2013 12:25 AM

1. Don't try to make friends.
"As a leader, you need to care deeply, deeply about your people while not worrying or really even caring about what they think about you," Costolo said. "Managing by trying to be liked is the path to ruin." 

Costolo admits this is easier said than done, but added it's important to avoid simply telling your employees what they want to hear. Don't apologize for making a tough decision, he said, be confident and clear when dictating what must be done.

2. There are many different ways to be a successful leader.
Often, particularly in Silicon Valley, successful CEOs are overanalyzed and placed under a microscope. "We take notes and we feverishly try to imitate what they've done to be successful," Costolo said. "The reality is, these people are the same people they were 10 years ago, and are going to be 10 years from now when it may not work at all for them.

The very same person they are today that's lionized may be frowned upon 10 years from now." Leadership techniques change, so it's vital to understand there are many paths to success.

3. Be transparent.
"The way you build trust with your people is by being forthright and clear with them from day one," he said. "You may think people are fooled when you tell them what they want to hear. They are not fooled." As a leader, people are always looking at you, Costolo continued. Don't lose their trust by failing to provide transparency in your decisions and critiques.

Read the article!

David Hain's comment, September 11, 2013 1:03 AM
Thanks Karin! Good spot!
Karin Sebelin's comment, September 11, 2013 1:07 AM
Thank you David :-)
Rescooped by David Hain from Value: Trust
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The Community of Leaders » Trustworthy Leadership

The Community of Leaders » Trustworthy Leadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

One of the business issues gaining in importance is the trust – or lack of trust – that we have in our large corporations.


Via ozziegontang, Annette Schmeling
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ozziegontang's curator insight, March 27, 2013 4:23 PM

In Vistage, the foundation of its Values, at the base of a triagle is: Trust. Up one side is Caring, up the other side is Challenge, and in the middle is growth.


Dan Ariely speak about the Cost of the Social Norm which is based on Trust and Social Relationships. The Market Norm is based on Financial Transactions.  When the Social Norm is replaced by the Market Norm he says it is extremely difficult if not impossible to regain the trust.


Trust cannot be bought, it must be earned.


If you lose my trust by your behavior, then I can trust that I cannot trust you.


Lee Thayer speaks of Leadership is a role that one plays. If one plays it well and is had by a vision that may outlast them, then history recognizes them as leaders. Those who we recognize as historical leaders did not have access to the 10,000 books that we have today on Leaderhship, yet what they accomplished was because of their competence at doing what needed to be done to accomplish their leadership role.


As Simon Sinek reminds us:  They had followers.





Rescooped by David Hain from Leading Choices
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The Top Trust Busters That Dilute Your Credibility

The Top Trust Busters That Dilute Your Credibility | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

"You wouldn’t deliberately dilute your own credibility. But it’s possible that some of your innocent behaviors are producing precisely that unintended consequence.

 

Credibility problems can come in the form of trust busters. Let’s consider two of the most common ones, along with their fixes that I call trust builders."

 

Trust Buster #1: Double Talk

Trust Builder #1: Clear the Fog

 

Trust Buster #2: Pulling Rank

Trust Builder #2: Drop the Pretense

 

Read the complete article for insightful details.


Via ThinDifference
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Rescooped by David Hain from Leading Choices
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Your Reputation is Your Most Valuable Asset

Your reputation is your most valuable asset, you are creating a trail in every area of your life about your integrity, performance, expertise and is becoming the backbone of Social Business.

 

Rachel Botsman gives a powerful talk on TED  about the currency of the new economy, which is trust. Rachel is the author of Collaborative Consumption. If you haven't read it, you should because it is an amazing book about a movement that is underway and the wave of the future.

 

It's empowering on so many levels. It has everything to do with the Trust Economy where technology has enabled trust between strangers to create all kinds of new marketplaces, relationships, possibilities. 

 

This is one of those talks that you have to listen to more than once, it's that important!

 

Here are some highlights to Rachel's talk

 

**In the 21st Century, the reputation economy will create new ways we look at wealth, it is as powerful as the industrial revolution, listening to this talk is a must!

 

**Empowering people to create new marketplaces that are built on reputation and trust

 

**We have wired our world to share, swap, trade or barter - match what we have in more democratic ways

 

**part of a massive value shift underway - instead of keeping up with the Jones, we're connecting, collaborating and buying to get to know the Jones

 

**Your reputation and new ways of measuring this is crucial. This is not like Klout, where they measure influence, this is about service networking. She refers to this as lemonade stands on steroids

 

**Think of all the possibilities - over the past 20 years, we've evolved trusting strangres

 

**Reputation economy - everything we do leaves a trail online about how well we perform, behave towards others - capturing all of this is a massive challenge

 

**Shouldn't we own our reputation data? It's contextual, the big challenge, is figuring out what data is important to pull, but it's a matter of time we will be able to see a real-time stream of how you have acted, performed in different areas of your life. What you're good at, your integrity and performance rating. This is fascinating.

 

**Reputation Capital - The worth of your reputation - how you can aggregate, monitor and use your online reputation (she says this sounds like Big Brother) however, she has a point, she says we would have more control over our reputation if we own it. More on this in the talk.

 

**Reputation Capital will create a massive disruption in the marketplace - your credit score will no longer limit what you can do in the world - your reputation will be the currency that you can be trusted

 

Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Hear complete talk here: [http://bit.ly/Ps0Fnp]


Via janlgordon, ThinDifference
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Daniel Depaz's comment, September 30, 2012 8:05 AM
Ta be seen... Thanks
Olga Kiss's comment, March 4, 2013 3:06 AM
Thank you, Luis, it's a great presentation. I've shared it on our Hungarian EMCC facebook page with a small Hungarian summary:
Luís Cochofel's comment, March 4, 2013 9:07 AM
Glad you liked it, dear Olga! Thanks for re-sharing, as i really think it worths being seen attentively.
Rescooped by David Hain from Trust is not earned ... Trust must be given ...
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Trust Is Your Trump Card

Trust Is Your Trump Card | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Via Karin Sebelin
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Karin Sebelin's curator insight, September 3, 2013 12:25 PM

Why trusted people don't need slick techniques to help them close the deal

Business strategist David Horsager explains:
“If you know how to become trusted, you will not need any technique. You won’t need a quickie little elevator speech. Some people use little trite things to manipulate [clients]. The bottom line is it does not work today, and it really never has.”

He lays out the following eight pillars for building or rebuilding trust in The Trust Edge, published by Simon & Schuster:
 

1. Clarity. People trust what is clear, not ambiguous.

2. Compassion. It’s one reason everyone loves Mom; she cares about others. Keep eye contact, empathize and hold one conversation at a time for effective listening.

3. Character. Do what’s right, not easy. Think George Washington.

4. Competency. Example: You don’t want just anyone to do your root canal. You want someone who will do it well.

5. Contribution. People trust your contribution, your results. Someone full of compassion and character who doesn’t bring results will suffer in the trust department. Ditto for a sales guy who brings results but in a sleazy way.

6. Commitment. The only way to build trust is to make and keep a commitment.

7. Connection. People like to buy from and be around friends.

8. Consistency. It’s why we trust McDonald’s. We get the same burger in Frankfurt as in Cleveland. 

As trust within an organization increases, so do output, morale, productivity and loyalty; meanwhile, costs, problems, stress and skepticism decrease. For the trusted brand, customers will pay more, come back and tell others, resulting in incredible benefits. He calls the trust edge the “greatest competitive advantage of all time.”  

Rescooped by David Hain from Communication & Leadership
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Ready for a vulnerability hangover? Five ideas from Brené Brown

Ready for a vulnerability hangover? Five ideas from Brené Brown | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Brené’s big idea is that vulnerability is good for you, or as she puts it, ‘vulnerability is our most accurate measure of courage’.

 

We live in a culture where making yourself vulnerable – exposing your fears and uncertainties, taking emotional risks – is considered a form of weakness, and something most of us want to run away from.

 

But Brené’s research reveals the hugely positive outcomes that emerge from stepping into the arena of vulnerability. It is precisely when we expose ourselves – perhaps in a relationship or at work – that ‘we have experiences that bring purpose and meaning to our lives’.


Via AlGonzalezinfo, Amy Melendez
David Hain's insight:

Vulnerability is my leadership word of the week, and such a valuable test of authenticity.  Having spent years disguising it, I wish I knew then what I know now...

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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, January 8, 2013 6:44 AM

A brilliant friend of mine once explained to me, "trusting others is difficult because it makes us vulnerable".  This is a fantastic article about why being vulnerable is good, plus so much more.

Rescooped by David Hain from Success Leadership
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The Trust Maturity Model

The Trust Maturity Model | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

The Trust Maturity Model from www.giveleaderhip.com...

 

What is the level of trust in your team?

 

Chaos? Learning? Optimizing? Or, Innovating?


Via AlGonzalezinfo, Richard Andrews
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Metta Solutions's comment, October 18, 2012 8:48 AM
AlGonzalezinfo thank you for all the follows - love your curated work as well. Still learning how to use all the features
AlGonzalezinfo's comment, October 18, 2012 9:49 AM
@Metta Solutions, you are welcome, I really like your curated work as well. One suggestion would be to link your twitter account to scoop.it, this way you will be mentioned automatically on twitter when we rescoop your posts.
Geoff Roberts's curator insight, January 18, 9:43 AM

Nice descriptive framework, but it needs a 'how to get there' as well...

Rescooped by David Hain from Leader review
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Strong Leaders Establish Trust

Strong Leaders Establish Trust | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

"Trust is a privilege, not a right. It's earned, not assumed. If you pay suppliers late, drive too hard a bargain, over-work and underpay your workforce, then you shouldn't be too confident of anyone's trust. If you treat everyone who connects your business with respect, you stand a far better chance. Think of it as an investment: The more you put in, the more you get back."


Via ThinDifference, Vincent Bransiecq
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