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Coaching Leaders
Helping leaders to develop themselves and others
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Rescooped by David Hain from Trust .... the only kind of influence that really matters
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Trust Is Your Trump Card

Trust Is Your Trump Card | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Via Karin Sebelin
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Karin Sebelin's curator insight, September 3, 2013 3:25 PM

Why trusted people don't need slick techniques to help them close the deal

Business strategist David Horsager explains:
“If you know how to become trusted, you will not need any technique. You won’t need a quickie little elevator speech. Some people use little trite things to manipulate [clients]. The bottom line is it does not work today, and it really never has.”

He lays out the following eight pillars for building or rebuilding trust in The Trust Edge, published by Simon & Schuster:
 

1. Clarity. People trust what is clear, not ambiguous.

2. Compassion. It’s one reason everyone loves Mom; she cares about others. Keep eye contact, empathize and hold one conversation at a time for effective listening.

3. Character. Do what’s right, not easy. Think George Washington.

4. Competency. Example: You don’t want just anyone to do your root canal. You want someone who will do it well.

5. Contribution. People trust your contribution, your results. Someone full of compassion and character who doesn’t bring results will suffer in the trust department. Ditto for a sales guy who brings results but in a sleazy way.

6. Commitment. The only way to build trust is to make and keep a commitment.

7. Connection. People like to buy from and be around friends.

8. Consistency. It’s why we trust McDonald’s. We get the same burger in Frankfurt as in Cleveland. 

As trust within an organization increases, so do output, morale, productivity and loyalty; meanwhile, costs, problems, stress and skepticism decrease. For the trusted brand, customers will pay more, come back and tell others, resulting in incredible benefits. He calls the trust edge the “greatest competitive advantage of all time.”  

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Conformity and creativity | TalentDevelop

Conformity and creativity | TalentDevelop | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

"The worship of convention will never lead to astonishment." Tama J. Kieves

 

Many artists and creative leaders in various fields are unconventional, embracing unique thinking, following their own path. Not conforming.


Via Douglas Eby, Karen Goldfarb Copywriter
David Hain's insight:

Great quote, excellent short article with good links!

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Carol Sanford's curator insight, September 3, 2013 11:48 AM

Love this quote. That is the philosophy of The Responsible Entrepreneur Institute. Revealing uniqueness, we think it is Essence, is the foundation of all great businesses, products, campaigns, worker contribution and happy lives. www.ResponsibleTrep.com Get Your Essence On!

Karen Goldfarb Copywriter's curator insight, September 3, 2013 7:50 PM

"If you spend too much time being like everybody else, you decrease your chances of coming up with something different." Ain't that the truth...

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The 7 Habits Of Highly Resilient People

The 7 Habits Of Highly Resilient People | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Rejection is rough, no matter how you slice it. But it's also an inescapable fact of life, and our ability to deal with failure and rejection has a hand in determining how successful and happy we are.

Via Greg Clowminzer
David Hain's insight:

Great primer on a key leadership attribute.

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Greg Clowminzer's comment, September 4, 2013 2:16 PM
Thank you for your comment David and yes I agree with you.
Rescooped by David Hain from Infotention
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How Experts Think

How Experts Think | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

"How does a quarterback think so fast? 

 

We can understand that by looking at other disciplines. Like quarterbacks, radiologists are experts in seeing things quickly. What is invisible to us is obvious to them. They can diagnose a disease after looking at a chest X-ray for a fifth of a second, the time it takes to make a single voluntary eye movement. As they become more trained, they move their eyes less until all they have to do is glance at a few locations for a few moments to find the information they need.

 

This is called “selective attention.” It is a hallmark of expertise.

 

Adriaan de Groot, a chess master and psychologist, studied expertise by showing a chess position to players of different ranks. He found that grandmasters evaluated few moves and re-evaluated them less often than other players. One grandmaster evaluated one move twice, then evaluated another and played it. It was the best possible move. This was generally true: Grandmasters never considered moves that were not one of the top five best possible moves. Other players considered moves as poor as twenty-second-best. The less expert the player, the more options they considered, the more evaluations they made, and the worse their eventual move was.

 

Less thinking led to better solutions. More thinking led to worse solutions. Were grandmasters making their moves by inspiration?

 

No. Experts do not think less. They think more efficiently. The practiced brain eliminates poor solutions before they reach the conscious mind."


Via Howard Rheingold
David Hain's insight:

Fascinating theory.

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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, September 3, 2013 10:45 PM

Metacognition is the interior aspect of infotention, just as managing information streams is the exterior aspect. Training one's attention online involves a great deal of conscious practice regarding what not to pay attention to, what not to think about.

roberto gilli's comment, September 18, 2013 4:02 AM
This theory works also for content curation and information browsing? I think so.
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5 Recruiting Habits Of Successful Leaders

5 Recruiting Habits Of Successful Leaders | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
At some point in our job-seeking lives, we’ve all interviewed at a company that felt more like a military school than an exciting, flexible, creative, ever-evolving workplace culture.
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Rescooped by David Hain from Emotional Intelligence
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How To Be A Really Really Good Listener

How To Be A Really Really Good Listener | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
I’m sure you’ve heard it said that to be a good listener you should walk a mile in the other person’s shoes. Okay. But exactly how do you do that? And how can you know that you are

Via Ken Donaldson
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Ken Donaldson's curator insight, September 2, 2013 7:40 PM

A Really Really Good Listener is Really Really Emotionally Intelligent...

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Michal's blog: Three Ways to Know When Coaching is Right for You

Michal's blog: Three Ways to Know When Coaching is Right for You | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
As a certified coach, people often ask me how to know if they could benefit from coaching. Many think it’s just for executives and high-profile leaders they’ve heard use it, like Eric Schmidt and Mark Zuckerberg – and then they...
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Do You Have These Bad Leadership Skills? | 4 Business Networking - Entrepreneurs Network

Do You Have These Bad Leadership Skills? | 4 Business Networking - Entrepreneurs Network | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Bad Leadership skills seem to be abundant in the workplace and organizational settings nowadays. It is not so easy to practice leadership that is why people seem to opt for the easy way out. They just use whatever leadership skills they have.
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Rescooped by David Hain from Lead With Giants Scoops
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Four Questions Every Leader Must Ask Themselves

Four Questions Every Leader Must Ask Themselves | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Leadership focus is usually on bottom-line, team morale, vision, and mission. But there are few things you have to ask yourself to gain perspective on where you are as an organization.

Via Dan Forbes
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Rescooped by David Hain from LeadershipABC
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Why Our Decisions Get Derailed and How to Get Back on Track

Why Our Decisions Get Derailed and How to Get Back on Track | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

On a wide range of dimensions, from our ability to make good decisions to our success in business, we tend to rate ourselves higher than our colleagues or peers.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Rescooped by David Hain from Communication & Leadership
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6 Exercises To Strengthen Compassionate Leadership

6 Exercises To Strengthen Compassionate Leadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Want loyal dedicated and passionate employees Be a loyal dedicated and passionate boss. Here are some tools to develop well-being in your workplace...

Via Amy Melendez
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Rescooped by David Hain from 21st Century Leadership
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The Leader-Member Exchange Theory - Team Management Skills From MindTools.com

The Leader-Member Exchange Theory - Team Management Skills From MindTools.com | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Use this theory to get the best from everyone on your team. (Here's a great article about how to use Leader-Member Exchange theory to get the best out of your team members.

Via Roy Sheneman, PhD
David Hain's insight:

Good theory and good site!

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Rescooped by David Hain from New Leadership
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Being The Best Isn't About Knowing The Most

Being The Best Isn't About Knowing The Most | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

When an individual believes they know all the answers, they shut themselves down from the possibility that there is more they might learn on a subject. 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Roger Francis
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Amy Melendez's curator insight, September 5, 2013 1:22 PM

Excellent post!

 

From the article:

 

A good leader cannot allow themselves to get sucked into the mindset of thinking that the talents of one employee are more important than the morale of many employees. As painful as losing a talented person can be, it is more painful to impact the entire culture of a company by supporting an “all about me attitude” of a single employee.

 

It is critical that leaders send a clear message that everyone matters equally to the organization, regardless of their title or position.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, September 13, 2013 1:17 PM

We need a different approach to knowing in the workplaces and in our institutions.

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Have the Courage to Stand Out - General Leadership

Have the Courage to Stand Out - General Leadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
“Anyone can achieve their full potential…but the path we follow is always of our own choosing.”
Martin Heidegger
One of my favorite stories as a child is the story of David and Goliath. It remains that way to this day.
David Hain's insight:

Some Great advice from my Giant friend John Michel!

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Rescooped by David Hain from Wise Leadership
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Perfectionism and work motivation may contribute to workaholism

Perfectionism and work motivation may contribute to workaholism | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Research from psychologists at the University of Kent suggests that being a perfectionist and highly motivated at work contributes directly to being a workaholic.Led by Dr Joachim Stoeber,

Via Wise Leader™
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Rescooped by David Hain from Business Coaching
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A Diseased Mindset

A Diseased Mindset | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Value Creators have a code. They have a certain mindset. It looks different to people who haven’t yet come to understand what the Value Creator knows. A lot of people have a mindset that is still d...

Via Miklos Szilagyi
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Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, September 3, 2013 4:23 AM

Simple, well usable checklist...

Rescooped by David Hain from Influence, EQ & Persuasion
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How to Win Over a Skeptic

How to Win Over a Skeptic | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
In Leading Skeptics and Believers I suggest that if you want to cause change, focus first on the “believers.” While many agreed with that point of view, there was a lot of discussion about what to ...

Via Anne Leong
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Rescooped by David Hain from Leadership with a splash of empathy
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3 Things a Great Leader Would Never Say

3 Things a Great Leader Would Never Say | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Sometimes leadership is quite simple: Avoid these three phrases.

Via Roger Francis, Jose Luis Anzizar
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John Michel's curator insight, September 1, 2013 9:29 PM

Are these three phases in your leadership lexicon? 

John Michel's curator insight, September 5, 2013 11:55 PM

Simple ways to keep yourself from saying something you'll one day regret.

Rescooped by David Hain from Empathy in the Workplace
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Having Power Diminishes Your Empathy For Others

Having Power Diminishes Your Empathy For Others | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

New research shows that increased power in an organization diminishes capacity for empathy.

 

Several research studies have shown that increasing power in an organization (or in any kind of relationship) tends to diminish capacity for empathy, compassion, and seeing another person’s perspective. This is especially damaging to effective leadership of people subordinate to those in power. Studies have shown that increased power diminishes activity of your “mirror neurons,” which provide the sense of connection with another person’s experience, and fuels empathy. Here’s the latest study that sheds more light on what happens. It shows the need for helping leaders develop and strengthen their capacity to connect with others’ reality and experience, which helps counter the tendency towards self-absorption in one’s own perspective, when one is in a higher-power status. 

 

Douglas LaBier, Ph.D.


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Rescooped by David Hain from Psyche & Neuroscience
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How Psychology Can Make You A Better Boss

How Psychology Can Make You A Better Boss | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
I reconnected this week with Dr. Elana Miller, MD, the Zen Psychiatrist.

Via Anne Leong
David Hain's insight:

Psychology can make you a better human being!

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Rescooped by David Hain from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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The Illusion of Failure

The Illusion of Failure | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
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Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 1, 2013 8:54 PM

The fear of failure is the world’s most destructive illusion. It’s not that fear isn’t real—it certainly is—but we oftentimes use its existence as a reason for our inaction, indecision, and ultimately our inability to try something new or believe we can succeed against the odds.


Before questioning the logic, ask yourself: Is failure (or fear of it) what prevents you from doing what you want—whether it’s getting in shape, getting your life in order, or just getting busy? Or are you just making excuses?

Rescooped by David Hain from Mediocre Me
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60 Ways To Make Life Simple Again

60 Ways To Make Life Simple Again | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Practical Tips for Productive Living

Via John Michel
David Hain's insight:

Going to try some of these...

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John Michel's curator insight, September 2, 2013 1:49 AM

When we were young life was easier, right?  I know sometimes it seems that way.  But the truth is life still is easy.  It always will be.  The only difference is we’re older, and the older we get, the more we complicate things for ourselves. All the more reasons to lean into some of these simple steps to simplify life...starting today. 


Rescooped by David Hain from Personal Knowledge Mastery
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Three Ways to Teach Yourself Something New

Three Ways to Teach Yourself Something New | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

If you look closely at people who are succeeding in this new digital world of work, you’ll notice they have something in common: they’re fast learners and they’re willing to adapt. If you want to grow as a person and a worker and if you want to gain skills that will help you take that next step in your career, you’ll probably have to learn those skills on your own.


In the post-recession workplace, your company probably isn’t going to send you to a conference so you can learn that new skill that will make you an even more valuable employee … Your boss probably doesn’t have time to hold your hand as you figure out how to use a new tool that will make your team more efficient. And it’s unlikely you’ll be encouraged to spend your workday focusing on forward-looking, innovative projects that will really help you grow.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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harish magan's comment, August 31, 2013 9:29 AM
learn new things always as you don't know when it will be needed. Self motivation is the best choice for gaining knowledge because if you have knowledge, can open many doors.
harish magan's comment, August 31, 2013 9:31 AM
Self motivation, eagerness to learn in today's competitive world with help of many tools which are available freely on the net,Teach yourself
Deborah Welsh's curator insight, May 3, 2014 10:47 PM

Yes you have time! Work smarter, not harder.

Rescooped by David Hain from Personal Knowledge Mastery
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Slideshare: Personal Knowledge Management

What is "Personal Knowledge Management" and what skills, tools and literacies do you need to ensure you remain relevant in today's fast-moving and sometimes chaotic environment.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Leonie Mateer's comment, August 30, 2013 6:00 PM
Love the quote "Getting information off the internet is like taking a drink from a fire hydrant!!" Oh how true..
Sharon Barich's curator insight, April 29, 2014 10:34 AM

#inf530 #inf532

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3 Leadership Lessons from Teachers - Rebel Brown

3 Leadership Lessons from Teachers - Rebel Brown | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Leadership lessons come from many places. Here's a GREAT lesson from teachers. We can ALL learn from them!
David Hain's insight:

Rationale for positivity!

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John Michel's curator insight, August 31, 2013 3:18 AM

We all know the power of being positive. Yet how often do we forget that power when leading during troubled times or with tormented teams? Let’s face it, we’re human. We forget and we lose our focus in the face of the details and daily disturbances that are part and parcel of the role of leader.

Yet we can learn some really powerful lessons from these studies in teaching our children. Here are three lessons to ponder.

Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.