Coaching Leaders
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Coaching Leaders
Helping leaders to develop themselves and others
Curated by David Hain
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Investments, Not Indulgences

Investments, Not Indulgences | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
A theme that comes up consistently in my coaching practice is the difficulty leaders experience making time for practices that could be described as forms of self-care, such as exercise, sleep, meditation, or reflection. It’s not that my clients don’t view these activities as important—they’re well aware that staying active, being well-rested, pursuing mindfulness, and thinking deeply are priorities. And it’s rarely the case that my clients lack the freedom to make time for these activities--most of them are CEOs or in other senior leadership roles that afford them substantial control over their calendars.

The difficulty lies in how they tend to view these activities—as indulgences. My clients are happy workaholics who enjoy pushing themselves to achieve aspirational goals (an identity I share). This attitude can be a powerful advantage, motivating them to go above and beyond the call of duty, but it also has a shadow side that must be managed carefully, particularly when people have advanced to senior leadership roles.
David Hain's insight:

Ed Batista on how - and why - self-care is an essential investment for us all!

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Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg Shares the Key to Creating Chemistry at the Top

Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg Shares the Key to Creating Chemistry at the Top | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
It’s no surprise that the most successful companies have great leadership teams at the top. Dubbed Silicon Valley’s “oddest couple” by The New York Times, together Sheryl Sandberg and Mark Zuckerberg have driven Facebook’s astronomical growth and supported one another along the way.

I recently connected with Sheryl for my Office Hours podcast series to discuss what’s behind Facebook’s success and her partnership with Mark – it’s a dynamic countless CEOs and COOs dream of having. In a relationship as critical as the one at the top, how do you create open lines of communication, respect differences and grow the business together? If we take Sheryl and Mark as the model, it boils down to three things: carve out time to communicate, prioritize the relationship and find a partner who shares your values.

As with any healthy relationship, open communication is key according to Sheryl. Despite their well-documented differences – from their backgrounds to their working styles and even clothing (she dresses up; he’s usually found in a hoodie) – Sheryl and Mark both believe in open communication. For them, that means 1:1s at the beginning and end of every week.
David Hain's insight:

How the 'odd couple' keep `Facebook moving. It's not rocket science, but it often doesn't happen...

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Tom Wojick's curator insight, May 17, 7:28 PM

The key to pulling this off is emotional intelligence.

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 18, 1:19 PM

What do you think?

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5 Ways to Succeed with an Inflexible Pigheaded Boss

5 Ways to Succeed with an Inflexible Pigheaded Boss | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Organizations need rigid people even if some think they’re evil. You don’t need the dark-side of their strength. But without them, inconsistency escalates into instability.

Sure, they stress themselves and others. They complain about missed commons. But, they’re great at following procedures and delivering consistent results.

David Hain's insight:

You can get on with that stubborn SOB - but only if you adapt your approach...

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The Biggest Mistakes New Executives Make

The Biggest Mistakes New Executives Make | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Organizations invest a lot of time and money in hiring the right CEO or senior executive to set a vision and make the changes in their company. Yet within the first 18 months, there’s a 50% chance the executive will leave the organization. This failure comes with enormous costs, not only in disruption to the organization but financially, too. One estimate puts the cost at 10 times the executive’s salary – sometimes more.

The reasons these individuals leave are many. They often cite poor cultural fit, inadequate onboarding, or the lack of appropriate expectations. But in reality, many new executives inadvertently set themselves up for failure within the first few months of their tenure through their own actions.

As an executive hired from outside the firm, you’ll naturally want to add value and assure your employers and employees that you are the right hire. But based on my work helping executives transitioning into new organizations, I’ve discovered common traps new executives tend to fall in, even as they try to solve problems, make decisions, and improve the company. Fortunately, there are ways to sidestep these traps so you can assimilate successfully into your new organization.
David Hain's insight:

You may feel triumphant on Day 1 - but most of the company didn't have a say in your hiring!

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Managing for the Long Term

Managing for the Long Term | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The success of a leader has more to do with intrinsic motivation, skills, capabilities, and character than with whether his or her pay is tied to shareholder returns. If leaders are poorly equipped for the job, giving them more “skin in the game” will not improve the situation and may even make it worse. (Part of the problem with equity-based pay is that it conflates executive skill and luck.) The challenges of corporate leadership—crafting strategy, building a strong organization, developing and motivating talented executives, and allocating resources among the corporation’s various businesses for present and future returns—are significant. In focusing on incentives as the key to ensuring effective leadership, agency theory diminishes these challenges and the importance of developing individuals who can meet them.
David Hain's insight:

Time to move the needle on leadership/CEO horizons?

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 11, 5:56 PM

This is what I and many others have been saying for years. You will notice that  the gap is widening in every element.

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Organizational Evolution: Are you ready? - Leadership & Change Magazine

Organizational Evolution: Are you ready? - Leadership & Change Magazine | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

This fascinating perspective is painted by Frederic Laloux, a management consultant who quit consulting to research which organizations would energize him (instead of exhaust and disengage). He connects the dots and paints the bigger picture in his book: Reinventing Organizations. We’re approaching our fifth big paradigm change. We and our organizations are already evolving toward the new era…. Self-management, wholeness, and evolutionary purpose seem to be the three key breakthroughs that “new organizations” offer – according to Frederic Laloux.

 

 The organizational stages during human development resembled wolf packs (tribal phase), armies (agrarian phase), machines (industrial age), and families (post-modern information age).What’s next? We’re on the brink of the fifth major leap in human development. Will we evolve to the Authentic Age, or the Integral Age? We long to self-manage, to be WHO we are at work (not just the narrow rational, masculine, professional ego side of ourselves) and to find an evolutionary purpose (why are we here, contributing to this organization’s purpose that makes a difference in the world?).

David Hain's insight:

Good summary of Fred Laloux's work on the future of organisations in this excellent online magazine from @MarcelaBremer.

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 5, 10:15 AM

Thanks for sharing David Hain.

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You can’t change what you don’t notice.

You can’t change what you don’t notice. | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Early in January, I hit a wall.

Over the previous year, I had set out to completely reshape The Energy Project, the company I run, and change is rarely easy. At mid-year, I got drawn into the presidential campaign, and it consumed a great deal of my time and emotional energy. And then, on January 1, my younger brother suffered a severe stroke. On the weekends, I began to travel back and forth between New York and Boston to be with him and his family.   

All this came back to me as I created a series of videos for LinkedIn about managing personal energy – and served as a humbling reminder of just how connected personal renewal is to performance, not just for our clients, but also for me. 
David Hain's insight:

More on the importance of managing personal energy and attention!

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donhornsby's curator insight, May 5, 9:12 AM
My most important lesson? You can’t change what you don’t notice. And you won’t notice until you make noticing a priority.
 
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 5, 10:26 AM

Paying attention to details is the single most important characteristic of a leader but right behind it is how you deal with what you see, positive or negative.

 

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, May 5, 12:37 PM
Spending a little time each day reflecting and meditating on our lives is essential. I did this and took up Yoga towards the end of my teaching career, when it was very stressful. It made a huge difference. Slowly, mindfulness crept into my daily teaching practices.
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The psychological importance of wasting time

The psychological importance of wasting time | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
There will always be an endless list of chores to complete and work to do, and a culture of relentless productivity tells us to get to it right away and feel terribly guilty about any time wasted. But the truth is, a life spent dutifully responding to emails is a dull one indeed. And “wasted” time is, in fact, highly fulfilling and necessary.
Don’t believe me? Take it from the creator of “Inbox Zero.” As Oliver Burkeman reports in The Guardian, Merlin Mann was commissioned to write a book about his streamlined email system. Two years later, he abandoned the project and instead posted a (since deleted) blog post on how he’d spent so long focusing on how to spend time well, he’d ended up missing valuable moments with his daughter.
The problem comes when we spend so long frantically chasing productivity, we refuse to take real breaks. We put off sleeping in, or going for a long walk, or reading by the window—and, even if we do manage time away from the grind, it comes with a looming awareness of the things we should be doing, and so the experience is weighed down by guilt.
David Hain's insight:

As someone about to depart for a long weekend in glorious West Wales, this article made sense to me!

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Henry Mintzberg about some Half-Truths of Management 

Henry Mintzberg about some Half-Truths of Management  | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
WE LIVE IN TIMES OF GREAT CHANGE

Have you heard this before—say in the last hour? Did you know that when a laptop detects a CEO about to type a speech, it automatically enters: “We live in times of great change.”  Why bother the CEO to type it again, since just about every management speech in the past few decades has begun with this line. That never changes.

Do we really live in times of great change? Look around and tell me what’s changed fundamentally. Your food, your furniture, your friends, your fixations? Are you wearing a tie, or high heels? How come: because you always have? How about your car? Under the hood is probably a four-cycle, internal combustion engine. That was in the Model T Ford.

When you got dressed this morning, did you say to yourself: “If we live in times of great change, how come we are still buttoning buttons?” (from Wikipedia: “Functional buttons with buttonholes for fastening or closing clothes appeared first in Germany in the 13th century”.)

What’s my point? That we only notice what is changing, and most things are not. Of course, some things are changing: information technology, most notably. Zap, I hit a few keys and Wikipedia tells me about buttons. I hope you have taken notice of this new technology, because it is rendering great changes.  But I hope that you are also taking notice of all the things that are not changing, because they are no less important. Managing change without managing continuity is anarchy.
David Hain's insight:

Don't be lazy about the management sound bytes!

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Time to move

Time to move | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
These technologies have the ability now to solve pressing problems in business and other types of institutions. They can make scarce knowledge more widely available, and make fast and accurate decisions. They work at all hours of the day and night. They can greatly augment our human capabilities for perceiving our environments and undertaking decisions and actions based on them. We cannot afford to be complacent as we plan our own futures in the workplace, but we also cannot afford to ignore the opportunities that cognitive technologies present.
David Hain's insight:

A new piece of jargon to me - cognitive technologies! But the article makes sense...

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 28, 11:47 AM

Interesting insights.  Thanks for sharing David Hain.

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How to Overcome the Fear of “Putting Yourself Out There"

How to Overcome the Fear of “Putting Yourself Out There" | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The long-overdue conversation about adversity and resilience launched by Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant’s book, Option B, has caused many of us to think about life’s toughest issues: mortality, bereavement, chronic illness, and so on.

Yet it’s also gotten me thinking about smaller scale forms of adversity, and how we best face them. Today, I want to write about just one of these. It is a challenge I know to be faced by so many people: of being driven to create, but afraid to share those creations with the world.
David Hain's insight:

The excellent Susan Cain on finding our courage. Glad she did! 

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Building Trust while Cutting Costs

Building Trust while Cutting Costs | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Restructuring initiatives can have a debilitating effect on the hearts and minds of employees, affecting those who stay as well as those who are let go. In our work with dozens of organizations implementing sweeping cost-cutting programs, we have observed firsthand the turmoil that employees experience — and how frequently their needs are forgotten during the crucial work of planning for the transformation.

But what if the restructuring were more than a slash and burn? What if it appealed to hope instead of fear? What if it not only promised, but actually delivered, a stronger company and a better place to work? Cost management is effective only when it leads to a less sclerotic, more aspirational enterprise — one without suffocating bureaucracy or micromanagement, in which initiative and entrepreneurship are encouraged and rewarded, internal processes serve the customers and employees instead of “the process” itself, and the company outperforms the competition consistently. If the restructuring doesn’t help the company get stronger — if it doesn’t lead to a better way of working for everyone in it — then it probably wasn’t worth conducting the exercise in the first place, because the effects won’t last.
David Hain's insight:

Nearly every top team I work with faces this problem paradox - slash and grow, simultaneously!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 27, 11:46 AM

The difficulty with cutting costs arise when the cuts are arbitrary or panic driven rather than thoughtful and logic.  Too often the former come to play.

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Management Lessons from One Hospital’s Dramatic Turnaround

Management Lessons from One Hospital’s Dramatic Turnaround | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Assuming the leadership of a 165-year-old institution that appears to be in long-term decline can be a daunting task — especially if it faces deep-rooted financial challenges, eroding market position, declines in quality, a fading reputation, an aging physical infrastructure, and an influential cadre of veterans satisfied with “good enough.”

This was the challenge Robert Grossman, M.D., faced when he became the dean and CEO of NYU Langone Medical Center in July 2007. Over the past 10 years, however, rather than preside over further decline, Grossman has led the institution, which comprises both NYU School of Medicine and NYU hospitals, to an impressive comeback.

The dramatic turnaround engineered by Grossman offers lessons for any manager seeking to overcome chronic underperformance. Confronting an entrenched, entitled workforce — the tenured faculty in an academic medical center — he and his team succeeded in raising performance standards throughout the enterprise, while simultaneously increasing commitment levels. The result has been significant improvements across key financial, performance, regulatory, and quality indicators:
David Hain's insight:

"building belief in the vision was critical..." - useful case study on successful turnaround programme.

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The halo effect, and other managerial delusions 

The halo effect, and other managerial delusions  | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Rather than succumb to the hyperbole and false promises found in so much management writing, business strategists would do far better to improve their powers of critical thinking. Wise executives should be able to think clearly about the quality of research claims and to detect some of the egregious errors that pervade the business world. Indeed, the capacity for critical thinking is an important asset for any business strategist—one that allows the executive to cut through the clutter and to discard the delusions, embracing instead a more realistic understanding of business success and failure.

As a first step, it’s important to identify some of the misperceptions and delusions commonly found in the business world. Then, using these insights, we might replace flawed thinking with a more acute method of approaching strategic decisions.
David Hain's insight:

Executives with halos are not generally a useful combination!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 25, 6:43 PM

Awesome article.

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Sheryl Sandberg’s Accidental Revolution – Backchannel

Sheryl Sandberg’s Accidental Revolution – Backchannel | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Even more than Option B is a self-help tome, it’s a management book. Sandberg shows how a boss can lift a whole organization by admitting she (or he) needs help. Management coach Kim Scott, who authored the book Radical Candor and once reported to her at Google, says this skill is increasingly important. “What you have in the generation of leaders that Sheryl represents is a move away from bureaucracy to relying on human relationships for managers to get things done,” she says. “That’s in the air, here in Silicon Valley, and I think Sheryl is largely responsible for it.”
With Option B, Sandberg is becoming the advocate for a radical approach to office openness. Everyone knows that the 20th century model of the Organization Man, characterless and rigidly devoted to the success of the corporation, is history. Work flexibility and individuality are in vogue. Yet we still expect our colleagues to contain and conceal their personal lives. Take five days’ bereavement leave when a spouse dies. Accept the company fruit basket that arrives in the mail. Return a week later and persist. Tech companies have been at the forefront of new, more flexible approaches to work that give workers more leeway to manage their personal lives. But we’ve all — everyone last one of us — struggled with how to talk about hard things with each other, at work and at home, and so often, we’ve reverted to silence.
David Hain's insight:

This will be an important book, if it persuades readers that not everyone has to experience unimaginable tragedy to recognise that the workplace is full of human beings wearing suits of armour!

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Fanta C. Sangaré's curator insight, April 26, 2:17 PM
Sheryl Sandberg est une femme d'affaires américaine que j'admire profondément. Numéro 2 de Facebook, elle a un parcours de femme et de professionnel fascinant et jonché d'astuces humanistes.
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The Perils of Peak Attention

The Perils of Peak Attention | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Two new books assess the quality of our digital lives: How do we shake off the village when we carry the world in our pocket?
David Hain's insight:

Good read on how to focus when so much is competing for our attention!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 22, 7:59 AM

Focus is critical for success today.  Without it distraction will hamper progress.

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Introverts tend to be better CEOs — and other surprising traits of top-performing executives

Introverts tend to be better CEOs — and other surprising traits of top-performing executives | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
A little more than half of the CEOs who did better than expected in the minds of investors and directors were actually introverts, not the usual gregarious CEO known for glad-handing customers.

"The biggest aha, overall, is that some of the things that make CEOs attractive to the board have no bearing on their performance," said Elena Lytkina Botelho, a partner at ghSmart and a co-founder of the project. "Like most human beings, they get seduced by charismatic, polished presenters. They simply do better in interviews."
David Hain's insight:

Charisma may get you noticed, but it doesn't guarantee success, asserts long term leadership study. Fits with my impressions!

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Random Acts Of Leadership™ | 9 Ways A Leader Can Earn Trust

Random Acts Of Leadership™ | 9 Ways A Leader Can Earn Trust | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The conditions for trusting someone are very personal. In fact, despite how logical your assessments regarding trustworthiness may seem to you, it’s important to remember that not everyone takes the same approach. Some of us grant trust and take it away when someone does not live up to our standards or expectations. Others believe trust must be earned. Many of us fall somewhere in between.

Also, consider that some approach trust as a feeling, using their intuition as their guide in whether to trust someone or not.

However, one thing is certain when it comes to earning trust as a leader: your actions speak far more loudly than your words.


David Hain's insight:

@SusanMazza knows that trust is the most valuable currency a leaders can purchase and spend!

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donhornsby's curator insight, April 20, 9:42 AM
We use the excuse of having to go to so many meetings or back to back meetings not only as a reason for being late, but for not preparing adequately. As John Wooden said: “failing to prepare is preparing to fail.” It also wastes people’s time, including yours. If you waste my time, how likely am I to trust you with something else that matters to me?
 
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 22, 8:01 AM

Can trust be formulaic?  What do you think?

Begoña Pabón's curator insight, May 3, 2:19 PM
Cuando se trata de construir y generar confianza como lideres, tus actos mandan mas que tus palabras.
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How to Tap the Full Potential of Your Executive Team

How to Tap the Full Potential of Your Executive Team | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Executive teams play 2 critical roles in an organization.

The first is obvious; they provide strategic and operational leadership to the company. They set goals, develop strategy, and ensure the strategy is executed effectively.

The second is less obvious, but just as important; the executive team provides the organizational and cultural DNA for the company. How well the executive team functions as a collective leadership body and how its members interact serves as the model that teams throughout the company will follow.
David Hain's insight:

Much of my coaching work is focused on having the top team recognise their role beyond getting tasks done!

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donhornsby's curator insight, April 19, 9:14 AM
How does one build a highly effective executive team?
 
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Seven Choices To Compassionate Leadership

Seven Choices To Compassionate Leadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Recent research shows that having a culture of compassion may not only build a happier workplace but also improve an organization’s bottom line. When we are supportive of one another there is often higher performance because team members feel valued and appreciated for their contributions and want to add more. Show compassion.
David Hain's insight:

Compassion makes sense, because in the end, we're all human, says @TerriKlass. Useful reminder...

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donhornsby's curator insight, April 19, 9:20 AM
How have you brought compassion to your leadership?
 
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 22, 8:02 AM

There needs to be more compassion today in business.  It is time to dump Machiavelli and embrace humanity.

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A Little Coaching Can Make Leadership Briefings Better

A Little Coaching Can Make Leadership Briefings Better | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
According to the Corporate Executive Board, leadership briefings are the fourth most popular means to communicate vital information to an organization — trailing behind email, intranet, internal social media and digital signage. But despite the lower ranking and a reputation for being ineffective, this method of staff communication deserves a second look, especially when CLOs team up with the company communications department to drive improvements.

According to the March CEB article, we can charge leadership briefings’ No. 4 status to the fact that senior leader messages only reach about half of their workforce. And employees tend to rate this type of communiqué as below average.
David Hain's insight:

If you're going to brief (and you should), make sure the message is heard, responded to and acted upon!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 22, 8:04 AM

Rather narrow channel but logic is correct.

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Conscious Culture Stage Development - Conscious Culture Group

Conscious Culture Stage Development - Conscious Culture Group | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Four Stages of a Conscious Culture

As the Founder and Chief Consultant of the Conscious Culture Group, I am asked how organizations move forward toward a conscious intentional culture. There are four stages:

1.     Unconscious unintentional culture

2.     Intentional learning and understanding

3.     Conscious culture

4.     Intentional review, reinforcement and adaption


Let’s examine each stage and indicators for each stage.
David Hain's insight:

You've got culture, like it or not. Make it an intentional journey!

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A CEO Manifesto for Better Meetings

A CEO Manifesto for Better Meetings | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Meetings. We may not like them but they are an indispensable part of modern work life and they’re essential to getting things done. To transform meetings from a slog into a structured opportunity to move things forward, you simply have to have a clear process for managing them properly.  Because meetings are a significant part of a CEO’s life, I’ve developed very clear rules and guidelines for meetings over the course of my over 40-year leadership journey. I’ve crafted these into a manifesto that adds discipline to ensure each meeting is as productive as possible.  Importantly, I tell my direct reports these expectations for meetings the very first hour of the first day we work together, when I “Declare Myself” – a practice I’ve developed to take the mystery out of working relationships and hit the ground running (you can learn more about the “Declaring Yourself” practice here).
David Hain's insight:

How one master CEO manages meetings!

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Fanta C. Sangaré's curator insight, April 18, 9:01 AM
Pour animer des réunions productives, 3 questions cruciales : Qu'est-ce qui fonctionne? Ce qui ne fonctionne pas? Ce qu'il faut? Vos collaborateurs ne perdront plus de temps en réunion avec un tel process !
Begoña Pabón's curator insight, May 3, 2:12 PM
Como lideres perseguimos la productividad de nuestros equipos y organizaciones y esto es especialmente critico en las reuniones de trabajo. ¿sabemos como gestionarlas de forma eficiente?
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18 Signs of Strong Personal Leadership

18 Signs of Strong Personal Leadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
How do you know if you have strong personal leadership?
David Hain's insight:

How do you measure up against this list? What would you add?

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 15, 8:23 AM

How many can you identify in your personal portfolio?  Really? I especially see #1 as critical, especially in today's world.

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If Humble People Make the Best Leaders, Why Do We Fall for Charismatic Narcissists?

If Humble People Make the Best Leaders, Why Do We Fall for Charismatic Narcissists? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Human beings hunger for superheroes.
Via Richard Andrews
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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 12, 1:28 PM

Excellent Question and yes there is a bit of the old HERO Man Leadership school in that process.  

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 15, 8:21 AM

As was so appropriately pointed out in the article, the choice is ours.  Always has been and always will be so let's choose wisely who we follow.

Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.