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Coaching Leaders
Helping leaders to develop themselves and others
Curated by David Hain
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Rescooped by David Hain from What Do Great Leaders Do Differently?
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How to Respond to Negativity

How to Respond to Negativity | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
"I'm getting to the end of my patience," Dan,* the head of sales for a financial services firm, told me.

 

This has to be one of the greatest frustrations of anyone in a supervisory role. I face it all the time as a coach of a high school girls basketball team. How do you "turn around" one or more individuals who are negative.

 

Some great insights to apply whether you're dealing with a client, customer, employee, peer, or team.

 

Barry Deutsch

IMPACT Hiring Solutions

http://www.impacthiringsolutions.com


Via The People Development Network, Barry Deutsch
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Rescooped by David Hain from Leadership with a splash of empathy
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Great Leaders 100 - Poor Leaders 0

Great Leaders 100 - Poor Leaders 0 | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Outperforming the Competition provides a key and immediate benefit—one that many managers do not realize—is that increasing your leadership skills...


Via Amy Melendez, AlGonzalezinfo, Jose Luis Anzizar
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Rescooped by David Hain from Success Leadership
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Trust: Seven Questions Leaders Should Be Asking

Trust: Seven Questions Leaders Should Be Asking | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
How to be a trust creator in an era of distrust...

Via Richard Andrews
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Rescooped by David Hain from Cultivate. The Power of Winning Relationships
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Say “Thank You” to Build Relationships in Business

Say “Thank You” to Build Relationships in Business | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Business relationships don't have to be very difficult. Sometimes it is the little things that count the most. Like saying “Thank You” and letting your vendors and customers know that they matter. Everyone wants to know they are ...


Via Morag Barrett
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Rescooped by David Hain from Surviving Leadership Chaos
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Called to the Front

Called to the Front | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

A few years ago I was asked to speak on “Leadership” to a women’s professional networking group within the Utility industry.  To prepare for the topic, which of course is really quite broad, I randomly selected about a dozen women in the organization to talk with about leadership.  I wanted to know whom they thought of when they thought of leaders in their life, if the women saw themselves as leaders, and how the women spent their time inside and outside of work.

 

Most of the women I spoke with were servants and most of them did not see themselves as leaders.  They served from where they were in all aspects of life.  

 

Serving is at the very heart of leadership.  And this was the message that these women needed to hear most.  It was by the very nature of their serving others that they were tapping into their leadership abilities.  In their very service, they were being “called to the front” – essentially to serve as leaders. 

 

They did not set out to lead, they set out to serve.


Via donhornsby
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Rescooped by David Hain from 21st Century Leadership
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The Secrets of Imperfection

The Secrets of Imperfection | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
You might think it’s awkward but I asked anyway. “What makes me think you can be a leader?” The person I asked is in their early 20’s with many leadership accomplishments. Maybe it was part humilit...

Via Kevin Watson, AlGonzalezinfo, Roy Sheneman, PhD
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14 leadership tips from top women business owners - San Francisco Business Times

14 leadership tips from top women business owners - San Francisco Business Times | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
14 leadership tips from top Women Business Owners (14 leadership tips from Bay Area women business owners: We interviewed the owners and executives of women-owned ...)...
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Leadership: Moderation Doesn't Mean Mediocrity | Kate Nasser

Leadership: Moderation Doesn't Mean Mediocrity | Kate Nasser | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Leaders, tap the power of moderation instead of believing success comes only through extremes. Moderation speeds success w/ the force of balance.
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7 Reasons Why Many Smart People Fail to Lead | Rajesh Setty

7 Reasons Why Many Smart People Fail to Lead | Rajesh Setty | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
RT @kjosephabraham: RT @kjosephabraham: 7 Reasons Why Many Smart People Fail to Lead - http://t.co/cIo8tdOa - @RajSetty # Leadership...
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Inside the Successful Leader's Mindset

Inside the Successful Leader's Mindset | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Set yourself up for success with four beliefs that help you persevere and tackle tough business challenges.Get the latest blog articles on business ideas and... (RE: @entmagazine Great post on #leadership.
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Rescooped by David Hain from Business Improvement
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10 Reasons Your Business Needs External Advisors

10 Reasons Your Business Needs External Advisors | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Far too many business owners baulk at the perceived costs of engaging external advisors to assist them to improve the performance of their businesses.


In the long run, this reluctance to invest in external advice generally proves detrimental, to the profitability and sustainability, of their businesses.


As a questionable but understandable cost saving measure, many owners of established businesses tend to rely on web-based information sites or Government Small Business sites in preference to engaging external advisors.


Whilst accessing free advice from reputable online sites is a step in the right direction, the main problem with this approach is that often, the key link between the advice offered and the skills available in the relevant business to successfully apply the advice, is missing.


Sometimes, less experienced business owners, access information from sites where the business information on offer is not only of poor quality but is often wrong, and acting upon such advice, can create additional problems.


The other aspect which limits the value of free online advice is the assumptions made by the business owners or their managers, as to the actual problem that they are seeking information to help them to resolve.


It is often the case, that a symptom of a problem is being addressed, where a more complete, focussed and analytical investigation by an experienced external advisor, would establish the real underlying problem, one that must be resolved before the business can move forward.


Aligned to the perceived cost of external advisors being a barrier to greater engagement between businesses and external advisors, is a poor understanding by many businesses of the benefits that external advisors bring to any assignment, and the real return on investment that building a short term or ongoing relationship with an external advisor, can provide.


The real benefits that external advisors bring to any business which has the foresight to engage them include;


1) Fresh and different perspectives


External advisors are usually very experienced, well qualified, and through interacting with numerous businesses in a variety of industries over many years, they can look at your business from multiple perspectives, as distinct from your own limited perspective.


2) Unbiased viewpoint


An external advisor is independent, unaligned to prevailing points of view within a business, and can call it exactly as they see it, usually without fear or favour. They are able to resist filtering information via the cultural bias of the prevailing culture, and as such, can readily spot the obvious.


3) Greater and often more up to date expertise


Good external advisors generally hold relevant business related tertiary qualifications, are usually continuous learners, and generally hold memberships of relevant professional bodies that assist them to stay up to date with current business thinking, and relevant technological advances.


4) Broader experience base


External advisors in general, work from a base of extensive experience, often across many industries, and most have held senior positions in listed and unlisted companies, as well as private companies, before becoming business advisors. They also come with an extensive base of contacts that they can draw upon depending on the situations they encounter.


5) Time management


Your time is vital, and the more of it you can spend on areas which utilise your strengths, the better off your business will be for this focus. An external advisor, by focussing on what they do best, will complete assignments much faster that you can, and the results they deliver will usually be time effective in implementation, thereby saving you even more valuable time.


6) Level of analytical skills


To survive in the business world, analytical skills of a high order are a pre-requisite for any professional business advisor. The skill to ask the right questions, of the right people, and analyse the information provided, before making recommendations or assisting to rectify a problem, is a skill not easily, or quickly, attained.


7) Add more weight to management change initiatives


Any management team attempting to introduce change initiatives, will find that support for the changes in the form of well justified recommendations coming from an external advisor, will assist greatly in selling those changes into the rest of the business.


8) Transference of skills and methodologies


External advisors undertaking assignments in any business will interact with key employees, who will observe both the skills displayed by the external advisor, and the methodologies they utilise as they proceed.


9) Stakeholder evidence of your mindset


All businesses have stakeholders and whether they are shareholders, vendors, suppliers, customers, clients or employees, they will notice the engagement of external advisors. The mindset of a business owner or manager who is willing to engage external advisors, is different than that of someone unwilling to do so, and engaging external advisors is a clear and positive mindset indication.


10) Profitability enhancement


To build a successful reputation, leading to future engagements, an external advisor is very conscious of the need to deliver tangible and measurable outcomes. As a consequence, the usual outcome of the involvement of an external advisor, are changes which once bedded down, positively impact on bottom line performance.


Clearly understanding the range of benefits that an external advisor can bring to a business, allows a business owner to conduct a more balanced assessment of the potential return on investment available, from engaging a suitable external advisor.


In most cases, a balanced assessment will establish that the returns on offer will fully justify a business owner’s decision, to advance down the path of engaging an external advisor.


Via Daniel Watson
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Marty Koenig's comment, September 28, 2012 12:13 PM
Right on!
Rescooped by David Hain from Communication & Leadership
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Personal Development & Gratitude

Personal Development & Gratitude | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
If you make time to list all the things you are grateful for, and you feel the feelings of gratitude, you will feel amazing every day. Your frequency will be.

 

If you make time to list all the things you are grateful for, and you feel the feelings of gratitude, you will feel amazing every day. Your frequency will be high and you will move through your days in love with being alive, bringing joy wherever you go, positively affecting one person after another.


When you live a life like this, everything you want will come before you even ask.


Via donhornsby, Amy Melendez
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Rescooped by David Hain from Building the Digital Business
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What’s your motivation at work? 3 questions to ask yourself

What’s your motivation at work?  3 questions to ask yourself | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Want to motivate others? Start by learning how to motivate yourself. That’s the message that best-selling author Susan Fowler highlights in a recent article for Ignite! In Fowler’s experience, you ...


Via Kevin Watson, Amy Melendez
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Rescooped by David Hain from MILE Leadership
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21 Tips to Become the Most Productive Person You Know

21 Tips to Become the Most Productive Person You Know | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
I wanted to help you create explosive productivity so you get big things done (and make your life matter).
Here are 21 tips to get you to your best productivity.
#1.
Via The People Development Network
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Rescooped by David Hain from Leadership Lite
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21st Century Communication: Principle #1--Character Is a Differentiator

21st Century Communication: Principle #1--Character Is a Differentiator | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Leaders who demonstrate character to build trust will lead the way in the 21st Century workplace...


Via Kevin Watson
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Rescooped by David Hain from The Way We Lead
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Is Leadership a Soft Skill?

Is Leadership a Soft Skill? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

By Thomas R. Northup

 

In today's new normal, we must adapt if we are to meet the economic and political realities of the next decade. The depth of the current downturn requires deep and rapid change, which is always driven by effective leadership.

 

All organizations are perfectly designed to get the results they’re now getting. All organizations have two things in common, a present and a future. During the present we program our future. If the future you envision is different from your present, you must exercise effective leadership to implement change starting today. Otherwise you will fall into the insanity trap; doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.

 

To achieve a different future, effective leaders define their intended vision, translate this into a plan, communicate the plan to employees, and develop their commitment. Defining the strategic direction is an extremely important leadership function. It focuses the team on the longer term. The purpose of strategy is to produce improved results on a continuous basis.

 

READ MORE: http://www.bizforum.org/Journal/www_journalTRN004.htm


Via Charney Coaching & Consulting
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Rescooped by David Hain from Success Leadership
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How to find balance between leadership and management

How to find balance between leadership and management | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

In Leading Change, the Leaders as Chief Transformation Officer, Warren Bennis said, “Management is getting people to do what needs to be done. Leadership is getting people to want to do what needs to be done. Managers push. Leaders pull. Managers command. Leaders communicate.”


Via Richard Andrews
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Rescooped by David Hain from What I Wish I Had Known
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20 Ways to Find Your Calling

20 Ways to Find Your Calling | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Not sure what to be when you grow up (whenever that is)? Fret no more. We can figure this out together. Let's get started. 1. Ignore the future, deal with the present.  The question, “What should I be when I grow up?

Via Anita
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Rescooped by David Hain from Story and Narrative
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Emotional Storytelling Drives Behavior Change

Emotional Storytelling Drives Behavior Change | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Public relations people need to harness the power of storytelling to drive behavioral change, Marion McDonald, managing director of strategy and planning at Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide, told a ThinkTank Live seminar in Hong Kong on “The Age of Engagement.”

 

“Science shows that humans organize experiences into stories,” says McDonald. “And we categorize them based on our emotional reactions to those stories. And science has shown that it’s the emotional part of the brain that helps us make decision. So when we appeal to people through facts and reason we’re missing the point. We need to reach them through emotion, and to do that we need to tell stories.”


Via Gregg Morris
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Rescooped by David Hain from Mindfulness Unbound
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How To Kill A Thought (In A Good Way): More On Mindfulness - Forbes

How To Kill A Thought (In A Good Way): More On Mindfulness - Forbes | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
We all have thoughts we can’t seem to snuff out. Here’s how to outwit your brain and quiet the chatter.

Via ThinDifference
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Rescooped by David Hain from Breakthrough leadership
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Building your leadership muscle - Washington Post

Building your leadership muscle - Washington Post | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Building your leadership muscleWashington PostDoug Conant was the president and CEO of Campbell Soup Company from 2001 to 2011, reversing the firm's precipitous decline in market value and employee engagement.


Via Cyrille Jansem
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Rescooped by David Hain from #BetterLeadership
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How to Motivate Your Employees [infographic] via @salesforce

How to Motivate Your Employees [infographic] via @salesforce | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

What’s the secret to motivating employees? This infographic explains it. 


Via Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN, AlGonzalezinfo
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Rescooped by David Hain from Art of Hosting
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How to be an appreciative listener

How to be an appreciative listener | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
How to be an appreciative listener - The way we ask questions determines what we find. In fact, the very first quest...

Via F. Thunus
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Rescooped by David Hain from Communication & Leadership
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Tacit Leadership: Power of the Implicit

Tacit Leadership: Power of the Implicit | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

There is a system behind The Implicit. This system has a feedback loop of one person conveying messages and another interpreting the messages, and we tend to attribute the meaning we associate to messages to the intent of the sender instead of saying it was what we interpreted.


Via AlGonzalezinfo, Amy Melendez
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Rescooped by David Hain from Psychology Matters
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5 Workplace Lies that Create Stress

5 Workplace Lies that Create Stress | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

“How do you deal with stress?” This staple of the job interview question bank made me ask myself “where does stress come from, anyway?” The answers I found mostly pointed to dishonesty of one kind or another. Get honest with yourself and your boss and you might kiss much of your stress goodbye.


Via Stewart-Marshall
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Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.