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I Know Your Biggest Blind Spot - Do You?

I Know Your Biggest Blind Spot - Do You? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

They're called blind spots for a reason - you can't see them. We all have blind spots, but the one most often impacting leaders is their unwillingness to ask for help. News Flash – “help” is not a dirty word. I have always believed asking for help is a sign of maturity as a leader. I think John Lennon said it best: “I get by with a little help from my friends.” So my question is this - are you easy to help?

David Hain's insight:

"If your pride, ego, arrogance, ignorance, the way you were raised or any other excuse (yes I did say excuse) keeps you from asking for help, it is precisely those traits that will keep you from maximizing your potential." ~ Mike Myatt @mikemyatt

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Henry Mintzberg about some Half-Truths of Management 

Henry Mintzberg about some Half-Truths of Management  | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
WE LIVE IN TIMES OF GREAT CHANGE

Have you heard this before—say in the last hour? Did you know that when a laptop detects a CEO about to type a speech, it automatically enters: “We live in times of great change.”  Why bother the CEO to type it again, since just about every management speech in the past few decades has begun with this line. That never changes.

Do we really live in times of great change? Look around and tell me what’s changed fundamentally. Your food, your furniture, your friends, your fixations? Are you wearing a tie, or high heels? How come: because you always have? How about your car? Under the hood is probably a four-cycle, internal combustion engine. That was in the Model T Ford.

When you got dressed this morning, did you say to yourself: “If we live in times of great change, how come we are still buttoning buttons?” (from Wikipedia: “Functional buttons with buttonholes for fastening or closing clothes appeared first in Germany in the 13th century”.)

What’s my point? That we only notice what is changing, and most things are not. Of course, some things are changing: information technology, most notably. Zap, I hit a few keys and Wikipedia tells me about buttons. I hope you have taken notice of this new technology, because it is rendering great changes.  But I hope that you are also taking notice of all the things that are not changing, because they are no less important. Managing change without managing continuity is anarchy.
David Hain's insight:

Don't be lazy about the management sound bytes!

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Time to move

Time to move | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
These technologies have the ability now to solve pressing problems in business and other types of institutions. They can make scarce knowledge more widely available, and make fast and accurate decisions. They work at all hours of the day and night. They can greatly augment our human capabilities for perceiving our environments and undertaking decisions and actions based on them. We cannot afford to be complacent as we plan our own futures in the workplace, but we also cannot afford to ignore the opportunities that cognitive technologies present.
David Hain's insight:

A new piece of jargon to me - cognitive technologies! But the article makes sense...

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 28, 11:47 AM

Interesting insights.  Thanks for sharing David Hain.

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How to Overcome the Fear of “Putting Yourself Out There"

How to Overcome the Fear of “Putting Yourself Out There" | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The long-overdue conversation about adversity and resilience launched by Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant’s book, Option B, has caused many of us to think about life’s toughest issues: mortality, bereavement, chronic illness, and so on.

Yet it’s also gotten me thinking about smaller scale forms of adversity, and how we best face them. Today, I want to write about just one of these. It is a challenge I know to be faced by so many people: of being driven to create, but afraid to share those creations with the world.
David Hain's insight:

The excellent Susan Cain on finding our courage. Glad she did! 

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Building Trust while Cutting Costs

Building Trust while Cutting Costs | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Restructuring initiatives can have a debilitating effect on the hearts and minds of employees, affecting those who stay as well as those who are let go. In our work with dozens of organizations implementing sweeping cost-cutting programs, we have observed firsthand the turmoil that employees experience — and how frequently their needs are forgotten during the crucial work of planning for the transformation.

But what if the restructuring were more than a slash and burn? What if it appealed to hope instead of fear? What if it not only promised, but actually delivered, a stronger company and a better place to work? Cost management is effective only when it leads to a less sclerotic, more aspirational enterprise — one without suffocating bureaucracy or micromanagement, in which initiative and entrepreneurship are encouraged and rewarded, internal processes serve the customers and employees instead of “the process” itself, and the company outperforms the competition consistently. If the restructuring doesn’t help the company get stronger — if it doesn’t lead to a better way of working for everyone in it — then it probably wasn’t worth conducting the exercise in the first place, because the effects won’t last.
David Hain's insight:

Nearly every top team I work with faces this problem paradox - slash and grow, simultaneously!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 27, 11:46 AM

The difficulty with cutting costs arise when the cuts are arbitrary or panic driven rather than thoughtful and logic.  Too often the former come to play.

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Management Lessons from One Hospital’s Dramatic Turnaround

Management Lessons from One Hospital’s Dramatic Turnaround | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Assuming the leadership of a 165-year-old institution that appears to be in long-term decline can be a daunting task — especially if it faces deep-rooted financial challenges, eroding market position, declines in quality, a fading reputation, an aging physical infrastructure, and an influential cadre of veterans satisfied with “good enough.”

This was the challenge Robert Grossman, M.D., faced when he became the dean and CEO of NYU Langone Medical Center in July 2007. Over the past 10 years, however, rather than preside over further decline, Grossman has led the institution, which comprises both NYU School of Medicine and NYU hospitals, to an impressive comeback.

The dramatic turnaround engineered by Grossman offers lessons for any manager seeking to overcome chronic underperformance. Confronting an entrenched, entitled workforce — the tenured faculty in an academic medical center — he and his team succeeded in raising performance standards throughout the enterprise, while simultaneously increasing commitment levels. The result has been significant improvements across key financial, performance, regulatory, and quality indicators:
David Hain's insight:

"building belief in the vision was critical..." - useful case study on successful turnaround programme.

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The halo effect, and other managerial delusions 

The halo effect, and other managerial delusions  | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Rather than succumb to the hyperbole and false promises found in so much management writing, business strategists would do far better to improve their powers of critical thinking. Wise executives should be able to think clearly about the quality of research claims and to detect some of the egregious errors that pervade the business world. Indeed, the capacity for critical thinking is an important asset for any business strategist—one that allows the executive to cut through the clutter and to discard the delusions, embracing instead a more realistic understanding of business success and failure.

As a first step, it’s important to identify some of the misperceptions and delusions commonly found in the business world. Then, using these insights, we might replace flawed thinking with a more acute method of approaching strategic decisions.
David Hain's insight:

Executives with halos are not generally a useful combination!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 25, 6:43 PM

Awesome article.

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Sheryl Sandberg’s Accidental Revolution – Backchannel

Sheryl Sandberg’s Accidental Revolution – Backchannel | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Even more than Option B is a self-help tome, it’s a management book. Sandberg shows how a boss can lift a whole organization by admitting she (or he) needs help. Management coach Kim Scott, who authored the book Radical Candor and once reported to her at Google, says this skill is increasingly important. “What you have in the generation of leaders that Sheryl represents is a move away from bureaucracy to relying on human relationships for managers to get things done,” she says. “That’s in the air, here in Silicon Valley, and I think Sheryl is largely responsible for it.”
With Option B, Sandberg is becoming the advocate for a radical approach to office openness. Everyone knows that the 20th century model of the Organization Man, characterless and rigidly devoted to the success of the corporation, is history. Work flexibility and individuality are in vogue. Yet we still expect our colleagues to contain and conceal their personal lives. Take five days’ bereavement leave when a spouse dies. Accept the company fruit basket that arrives in the mail. Return a week later and persist. Tech companies have been at the forefront of new, more flexible approaches to work that give workers more leeway to manage their personal lives. But we’ve all — everyone last one of us — struggled with how to talk about hard things with each other, at work and at home, and so often, we’ve reverted to silence.
David Hain's insight:

This will be an important book, if it persuades readers that not everyone has to experience unimaginable tragedy to recognise that the workplace is full of human beings wearing suits of armour!

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Fanta C. Sangaré's curator insight, April 26, 2:17 PM
Sheryl Sandberg est une femme d'affaires américaine que j'admire profondément. Numéro 2 de Facebook, elle a un parcours de femme et de professionnel fascinant et jonché d'astuces humanistes.
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The Perils of Peak Attention

The Perils of Peak Attention | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Two new books assess the quality of our digital lives: How do we shake off the village when we carry the world in our pocket?
David Hain's insight:

Good read on how to focus when so much is competing for our attention!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 22, 7:59 AM

Focus is critical for success today.  Without it distraction will hamper progress.

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Introverts tend to be better CEOs — and other surprising traits of top-performing executives

Introverts tend to be better CEOs — and other surprising traits of top-performing executives | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
A little more than half of the CEOs who did better than expected in the minds of investors and directors were actually introverts, not the usual gregarious CEO known for glad-handing customers.

"The biggest aha, overall, is that some of the things that make CEOs attractive to the board have no bearing on their performance," said Elena Lytkina Botelho, a partner at ghSmart and a co-founder of the project. "Like most human beings, they get seduced by charismatic, polished presenters. They simply do better in interviews."
David Hain's insight:

Charisma may get you noticed, but it doesn't guarantee success, asserts long term leadership study. Fits with my impressions!

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Random Acts Of Leadership™ | 9 Ways A Leader Can Earn Trust

Random Acts Of Leadership™ | 9 Ways A Leader Can Earn Trust | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The conditions for trusting someone are very personal. In fact, despite how logical your assessments regarding trustworthiness may seem to you, it’s important to remember that not everyone takes the same approach. Some of us grant trust and take it away when someone does not live up to our standards or expectations. Others believe trust must be earned. Many of us fall somewhere in between.

Also, consider that some approach trust as a feeling, using their intuition as their guide in whether to trust someone or not.

However, one thing is certain when it comes to earning trust as a leader: your actions speak far more loudly than your words.


David Hain's insight:

@SusanMazza knows that trust is the most valuable currency a leaders can purchase and spend!

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donhornsby's curator insight, April 20, 9:42 AM
We use the excuse of having to go to so many meetings or back to back meetings not only as a reason for being late, but for not preparing adequately. As John Wooden said: “failing to prepare is preparing to fail.” It also wastes people’s time, including yours. If you waste my time, how likely am I to trust you with something else that matters to me?
 
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 22, 8:01 AM

Can trust be formulaic?  What do you think?

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How to Tap the Full Potential of Your Executive Team

How to Tap the Full Potential of Your Executive Team | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Executive teams play 2 critical roles in an organization.

The first is obvious; they provide strategic and operational leadership to the company. They set goals, develop strategy, and ensure the strategy is executed effectively.

The second is less obvious, but just as important; the executive team provides the organizational and cultural DNA for the company. How well the executive team functions as a collective leadership body and how its members interact serves as the model that teams throughout the company will follow.
David Hain's insight:

Much of my coaching work is focused on having the top team recognise their role beyond getting tasks done!

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donhornsby's curator insight, April 19, 9:14 AM
How does one build a highly effective executive team?
 
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Seven Choices To Compassionate Leadership

Seven Choices To Compassionate Leadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Recent research shows that having a culture of compassion may not only build a happier workplace but also improve an organization’s bottom line. When we are supportive of one another there is often higher performance because team members feel valued and appreciated for their contributions and want to add more. Show compassion.
David Hain's insight:

Compassion makes sense, because in the end, we're all human, says @TerriKlass. Useful reminder...

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donhornsby's curator insight, April 19, 9:20 AM
How have you brought compassion to your leadership?
 
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 22, 8:02 AM

There needs to be more compassion today in business.  It is time to dump Machiavelli and embrace humanity.

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A Little Coaching Can Make Leadership Briefings Better

A Little Coaching Can Make Leadership Briefings Better | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
According to the Corporate Executive Board, leadership briefings are the fourth most popular means to communicate vital information to an organization — trailing behind email, intranet, internal social media and digital signage. But despite the lower ranking and a reputation for being ineffective, this method of staff communication deserves a second look, especially when CLOs team up with the company communications department to drive improvements.

According to the March CEB article, we can charge leadership briefings’ No. 4 status to the fact that senior leader messages only reach about half of their workforce. And employees tend to rate this type of communiqué as below average.
David Hain's insight:

If you're going to brief (and you should), make sure the message is heard, responded to and acted upon!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 22, 8:04 AM

Rather narrow channel but logic is correct.

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Conscious Culture Stage Development - Conscious Culture Group

Conscious Culture Stage Development - Conscious Culture Group | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Four Stages of a Conscious Culture

As the Founder and Chief Consultant of the Conscious Culture Group, I am asked how organizations move forward toward a conscious intentional culture. There are four stages:

1.     Unconscious unintentional culture

2.     Intentional learning and understanding

3.     Conscious culture

4.     Intentional review, reinforcement and adaption


Let’s examine each stage and indicators for each stage.
David Hain's insight:

You've got culture, like it or not. Make it an intentional journey!

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A CEO Manifesto for Better Meetings

A CEO Manifesto for Better Meetings | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Meetings. We may not like them but they are an indispensable part of modern work life and they’re essential to getting things done. To transform meetings from a slog into a structured opportunity to move things forward, you simply have to have a clear process for managing them properly.  Because meetings are a significant part of a CEO’s life, I’ve developed very clear rules and guidelines for meetings over the course of my over 40-year leadership journey. I’ve crafted these into a manifesto that adds discipline to ensure each meeting is as productive as possible.  Importantly, I tell my direct reports these expectations for meetings the very first hour of the first day we work together, when I “Declare Myself” – a practice I’ve developed to take the mystery out of working relationships and hit the ground running (you can learn more about the “Declaring Yourself” practice here).
David Hain's insight:

How one master CEO manages meetings!

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Fanta C. Sangaré's curator insight, April 18, 9:01 AM
Pour animer des réunions productives, 3 questions cruciales : Qu'est-ce qui fonctionne? Ce qui ne fonctionne pas? Ce qu'il faut? Vos collaborateurs ne perdront plus de temps en réunion avec un tel process !
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18 Signs of Strong Personal Leadership

18 Signs of Strong Personal Leadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
How do you know if you have strong personal leadership?
David Hain's insight:

How do you measure up against this list? What would you add?

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 15, 8:23 AM

How many can you identify in your personal portfolio?  Really? I especially see #1 as critical, especially in today's world.

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If Humble People Make the Best Leaders, Why Do We Fall for Charismatic Narcissists?

If Humble People Make the Best Leaders, Why Do We Fall for Charismatic Narcissists? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Human beings hunger for superheroes.
Via Richard Andrews
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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 12, 1:28 PM

Excellent Question and yes there is a bit of the old HERO Man Leadership school in that process.  

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 15, 8:21 AM

As was so appropriately pointed out in the article, the choice is ours.  Always has been and always will be so let's choose wisely who we follow.

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Legacy thinking

Legacy thinking | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Legacy thinking is about respecting the past, acting in the present and serving the future. It is about being a good ancestor, taking into account future generations, the environment and sustainability in the decisions you make and the actions you take. But it is also about being a good descendant too, learning from and building on what went before, avoiding the repetition of mistakes, enhancing the advances and innovations, preserving the stories and adding new pages to them. The legacy thinker is historian, playmaker, futurist.

David Hain's insight:

Concept from Richard Martin and Kenneth Mikkelsen's great book, "The Neo-Generalist". Lots of connections...

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 15, 8:32 AM

I like the concept.  Too many today are focused on short-term thinking and performance with no thought about the future yet the future is where profits will be made.

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Option B: Build your resilience

Option B: Build your resilience | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Resilience is like a muscle you can build. It’s just a matter of knowing how. Whether you’re facing adversity yourself or supporting someone else who is, these resources can help. We’re always adding to our library of materials, so check back in from time to time.
David Hain's insight:

Useful new site on resilience, based on the book by Adam Grant and Sheryl Sandberg!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 15, 8:31 AM

I loved the concept, thanks for sharing David Hain.  I wonder if people in business would be willing to support a site that is focused on business ethics, performance and interactions? What does everyone think?

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Quiet Power: How to succeed as an introvert in the workplace 

Quiet Power: How to succeed as an introvert in the workplace  | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Being an introvert by nature prevents women in particular from getting ahead in business. To remain true to themselves, how can more low-key personalities achieve their goals?
Donald Trump has proved that the most uninhibited extrovert can stomp to the very top of the leadership ladder. Trump thrives when he’s among the masses. The bigger the crowd, the louder and more assured he gets. He knows exactly what to say, at just the right time.  

As an extrovert, Trump is an extreme and, perhaps, aggressive example. Yet, he does embody elements of the personality trait that society favours; we smile at the toddler who sings the loudest at music group and laugh with the quick-witted classmate. We savour positive attention from the bubbly girls and outgoing guys at high school.

Even the workplace is set up to favour extroverts, says Susan Cain, best-selling author and co-founder of the Quiet Revolution, an organisation that aims to unlock the power of introverts. “We work in open-plan offices without walls, where we are subject to the constant noise and gaze of our co-workers,” she says in her TED talk on introversion, which has been viewed more than 15 million times. “And when it comes to leadership, introverts are routinely passed over for these positions.”

Researchers estimate that a third to a half of the population lean towards introversion. Applied to the workplace, can this number be ignored?
David Hain's insight:

Some positive ways to be quietly powerful...!

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donhornsby's curator insight, April 14, 8:27 AM
Researchers estimate that a third to a half of the population lean towards introversion. Applied to the workplace, can this number be ignored?
 
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A CEO’s Understanding of Human and Cultural Dynamics during Transformation Is Critical to Success

A CEO’s Understanding of Human and Cultural Dynamics during Transformation Is Critical to Success | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
As CEO, learn the strategies for effectively handling human and cultural dynamics so you and your leaders can make intelligent decisions about how to proactively handle them from the very beginning of your transformation. Doing so will make you and your leaders better able to design and implement your change initiatives to ensure greater buy-in, faster employee engagement, minimize resistance, and support people to commit and participate in positive ways. This is a core accelerator of change and a sure way to minimize cost! And, by the way, it will radically increase your leadership credibility.  
David Hain's insight:

The soft stuff makes the hard stuff stick! And it does wonders for personal credibility...

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Nicolas Petitjean's curator insight, April 13, 6:28 AM

The soft stuff makes the hard stuff stick! And it does wonders for personal credibility...

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 13, 11:18 AM

Absolutely critical.

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Peter Drucker: How to (Actually) Manage Your Time 

Peter Drucker: How to (Actually) Manage Your Time  | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
In The Essential Drucker — an excellent intro to Drucker’s prolific writings (over 30 books!) — there’s an entire chapter devoted to his method of time management.
I’ve used a variant Drucker’s method on and off for a while now. When I do use it, I am a productive beast, averaging 7–8 hours of quality work a day. When I don’t, I average 2–3 hours — no better than the average American.
Let’s take a look at Drucker’s method.
David Hain's insight:

The organisation guru's guru on a simple method to ensure that we max our most valuable resource! 

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Nicolas Petitjean's curator insight, April 13, 6:30 AM

The organisation guru's guru on a simple method to ensure that we max our most valuable resource! 

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 13, 11:44 AM

Time is too valuable to flitter away.

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Your Brain on Learning

Your Brain on Learning | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Most trainings fall down because we leave it up to the employee to go back and change their behavior when they go back to an environment that’s already rigged to have them execute the old habit,” she explained. “If they don’t have some intentionality, some chances to develop repetitions of doing it correctly, all the best intentions in the world will fall down.
David Hain's insight:

Are you following through on money you are spending on leadership coaching and development? Thats where you get the bangs for your buck!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 12, 1:26 PM

I also find that many training programs are excellent but when taken back to the job, leaders won't all the new practices to be used. Not it becomes a waste of money.

Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, April 13, 3:55 PM
It's about the durable maintenability, or the proficiency of putting into practice the human development (training, coaching, etc.)... I would add four remarks: 

 1. It helps a lot if the leader/manager still before the development shows a genuine interest, even enthusiasm about the development process. Then the participant will know that it is important, he/she should be easier motivated because the workplace is waiting eagerly his/her new or more finetuned skill. 

2. During the training/coaching the facilitator should make it possible that the participants have an as passionate as possible experience, either at the theory as at the practice part. I know, it's not an easy task but without it the money for the development is just thrown out of the window because nobody is learning on purely cognitive basis. If the heart is not there it simply run through without any seeable imprint, if a sort of flow/joy wasn't there, the topics handled are quickly fading...

3. At the end, still during the practice a sort of agreement should be facilitated among the participants (or in case of a personal coaching with the leader/manager and/or with some coworkers) how they exactly will practice in the everyday working relationships what they learned. 

4. After the reinsertion somehow the environment and the participants themselves should be informed and asked for mutual accountability warning in case somebody would fall back into the old habits... 

And you know what? All these are just simple common sense, you do not need for any neuroscience smartness. Of course, it works only if you do it accordingly...
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What makes a CEO ‘exceptional’? | McKinsey 

New CEOs face enormous challenges as they start assembling a management team and setting a strategic direction in today’s volatile environment. To provide some guidance for transitioning CEOs, we looked at the experiences of exceptional CEOs, those defined as the very top performers in our data set of roughly 600 chief executives at S&P 500 companies between 2004 and 2014.
David Hain's insight:

Do these CEO actions predict success?

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25 Powerful Coaching Questions to Get Where You Want to Go | Jesse Lyn Stoner

25 Powerful Coaching Questions to Get Where You Want to Go | Jesse Lyn Stoner | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Coaching is not just for problems. Coaching helps you avoid problems by providing space to think and be more intentional about your goals and actions. And coaching is especially helpful for getting clarity on where you want to go.
Working with a coach gives you:
• Space for self-reflection
• Fresh perspective
• Challenges where your thinking is stuck
• Support for difficulties and new ideas
• Accountability for your plans
Coaches don’t provide answers, they ask great questions. Good coaching questions help you find your own answers.
In this Ted Talk, Bill Gates says, “everyone needs a coach.” 
David Hain's insight:

If you can't afford a coach, try self coaching! Plus wise words form Bill Gates.

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Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.