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The One Ingredient Your Strengths May Be Missing

The One Ingredient Your Strengths May Be Missing | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The following is a guest piece by G5 Learning co-founder and author Steven Smith.
Everyone wonders where their true strengths lie.
David Hain's insight:

The Decisive or hasty? The importance of confidence in deploying strengths. Reminds me that the longest distance in golf is the one between your ears!

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Helping leaders to develop themselves and others
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How to Choose a Mentor

How to Choose a Mentor | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The benefits of having a mentor are big. A survey of Fortune 500 companies found that 96% of executives credited mentoring as an important development tool and 75% said mentoring played a key role in their career success.

But how do you get a mentor?

Many employees and managers complain about not having a mentor. Such people are usually waiting for the company to assign a mentor to them. Mentoring works much better when the mentee takes responsibility for choosing a mentor.

So, the first place to start is to find one yourself! Below are some characteristics of great mentors:
David Hain's insight:

Everyone needs a mentor! I certainly do. How to find the right one for you...

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donhornsby's curator insight, Today, 9:05 AM
(From the article): The aim of mentoring is to build the capability of you, the mentee. As such, you should always choose a mentor who you feel can respond to your needs in a way that enables you to find your own solutions to problems that you may be dealing with. Ultimately, your mentor should help build you up to eventually have a mentee of your own!
Raynak Search's curator insight, Today, 11:29 AM
Great advice for all of you on your way to the C-Suite and beyond
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12 Neglected Questions Successful Leaders Keep Asking

12 Neglected Questions Successful Leaders Keep Asking | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Wrong questions turn people’s attention to distracting issues. You hinder progress when you distract your team.

Distractions cause damage.
David Hain's insight:

5 minutes. 12 questions. A lifetime of exploration! Great coaching input from @Leadershipfreak!

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The Career Limitations Of Emotional Intelligence

The Career Limitations Of Emotional Intelligence | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Surely by now you’ve heard: Highly emotionally intelligent people are more successful, and companies are bending over backward to recruit them.

The term "emotional intelligence" (often abbreviated to EQ or EI) was first coined by the psychologist and former New York Times journalist Daniel Goleman in 1995, and while it’s had its critics, the term’s buzzword status hasn’t relented much since. That’s partly because the skills and attributes it describes are indeed in hot demand by employers.

But for job seekers, there’s also reason to be cautious about prioritizing emotional intelligence at the expense of all else.
David Hain's insight:

High EQ is worth having - but it's not the only thing worth having!

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From the Outside In

From the Outside In | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

In September 2015, Ralph Lauren, founder and chief executive officer of the fashion empire that bears his name, made news by announcing he would step down from his post as CEO. His decision to hand off the reins of his company wasn’t surprising — Lauren was about to turn 76, and the company’s financial performance had been slipping. Rather, the announcement was noteworthy because Lauren is known for favoring continuity in his clothing design and in management. During his nearly 50 years at the company, he had made it a practice to promote from within. And yet Lauren’s handpicked successor would be a newcomer to the firm, Swedish retail executive Stefan Larsson. Larsson had not lived and breathed Polo. And his prior experience was at discount-oriented retailing brands. But he was nonetheless a rising star in the business of fashion. Larsson’s accomplishments include driving successful international expansion over a 15-year career at H&M, and engineering an impressive turnaround of Gap’s Old Navy division, of which he was named president in 2012.

This episode is indicative of a broader trend evident in the high-stakes arena of CEO succession. Hiring an executive from outside a company to serve as chief executive officer has historically been a last resort — a move companies typically made only when a board of directors needed to force out the incumbent CEO suddenly, or had failed to groom a suitable successor, or both. Sometimes companies would interview outsiders as they were planning to make a change. But often those interviews were simply pro forma, and the board would revert to an insider as the final choice. That’s changing. Over the last several years, we have seen more companies deliberately choosing an outsider CEO. And when they do, more often than not, it is part of a planned succession.

David Hain's insight:

Article on CEO succession strategy includes interactive quiz on whether you have what it takes to be a CEO.

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Reclaim Your Job

Reclaim Your Job | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Truly effective managers don’t operate in the context of individual tasks or jobs but in the much broader context of their organizations and careers. That approach sounds simple enough, but it is sometimes hard to act on because some organizational cultures that tout “empowerment” actually discourage volition among their managers. Young, high-tech companies, for example, sometimes hold their managers hostage to frenzy, thus inhibiting the reflective and persistent pursuit of long-term goals. Other cultures—particularly those of old and established corporations with command-and-control hierarchies—can encourage people to go along with the status quo, regardless of the level of organizational dysfunction. In both kinds of environments, managers tend to fall into a reactive state of mind, assuming that any initiative they show will be either ignored or discouraged.

In most cases, however, it is not the environment that inhibits managers from taking purposeful action. Rather, it is managers themselves. We have found that managers can learn to act on their own potential and make a difference. Here’s how.

David Hain's insight:

Some thoughts from HBR on how to take hold of your agenda - 12 years old and needed more than ever!

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The Authenticity Factor | The Purposeful Culture Group

The Authenticity Factor | The Purposeful Culture Group | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Our great bosses kept their commitments, delivering on their promises. If they were unable to keep their commitments, they told us why, well in advance of the deadline. They also explained how they were trying to get back on track, as soon as possible.

Unfortunately, leaders that demonstrate authentic care are not the norm. For example, TinyHR’s 2014 engagement and culture survey found that 49% of employees are not satisfied with their direct supervisor.
David Hain's insight:

If doing what you say is so important and basic (see last scoop), why do so many appear to fail to understand?

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Trust Requires Fewer Promises & More Delivery

Trust Requires Fewer Promises & More Delivery | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Reliability, dependability, integrity -- these are the essential building blocks of trust. Sounds simple, yet they are so difficult to achieve day in, day out. 

Under-promising and over-delivery is the ticket, of course.
David Hain's insight:

Trust is critical in the relationship economy. Doing what you say is critical in building trust! Hubris is your enemy, don't do it!

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How to Find Your Power—and Avoid Abusing It

How to Find Your Power—and Avoid Abusing It | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

For the past twenty years, I have been carrying out experiments to find out how power is distributed in groups. I have infiltrated college dorms and children’s summer camps to document who rises in power. I have brought entire sororities and fraternities into the lab, capturing the substance and spread of individuals’ reputations within their social networks. I have surreptitiously identified which members of groups are gossiped about, and who receive gossip. To chart the experience of power, I have studied what it feels like to be placed in positions of authority.

Findings from this research converge on an organizing idea: Whereas the Machiavellian approach to power assumes that individuals grab it through coercive force, strategic deception, and the undermining of others, the science finds that power is not grabbed but is given to individuals by groups.
What this means is that your ability to make a difference in the world—your power, as I define it—is shaped by what other people think of you. Your capacity to alter the state of others depends on their trust in you. Your ability to empower others depends on their willingness to be influenced by you. Your power is constructed in the judgments and actions of others. When they grant you power, they increase your ability to make their lives better—or worse.

David Hain's insight:

Givers always gain, and it seems from exhaustive research that power may be one of the things they gain from giving!

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 23, 10:43 AM
Leading is about listening and stepping aside when it is necessary. When we experience leadership as an assigned role, that is when problems arise and abuse of power occurs. What do we see in schools?
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How Your Leadership Has to Change as Your Startup Scales

How Your Leadership Has to Change as Your Startup Scales | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

To scale the business successfully, entrepreneurs need  their employees onboard. To get there, they need to focus on  motivational drivers and shift  mindset from “startup” to “scale up.” The latter requires balancing the “push” mode of leadership (tell, direct, delegate) with a “pull” approach (empower, collaborate, coach), which has been shown to generate greater commitment and creativity in staff members no matter their age or the size of the company.

Here are four things leaders and their organizations can do to move from startup mode to scale-up mode:

David Hain's insight:

There are some key scale thresholds that imply leadership style shifts as business grow. Miss them at your peril!

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The Buddha’s concept of leadership - The Nation

The Buddha’s concept of leadership - The Nation | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The Buddhist concept of leadership as it is exemplified in the life of the Buddha has many unique features in addition to the usual leadership qualities that social-psychologists enlist today. The most important was that the Buddha never gave the impression to his followers that he was imposing leadership on them. He wanted maintain that there was the possibility to his followers to attain the same heights and become his equals. The role he wanted to play was that of a kind teacher who showed the way for excellence which was not an impossible goal for the followers.
David Hain's insight:

Buddha's leadership style!

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The 12 Steps of Taking Ourselves a Little Less Seriously -

The 12 Steps of Taking Ourselves a Little Less Seriously - | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Recovering a sense of humor may be just the change we need.
Via F. Thunus, Sushma Sharma
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Why you need to listen to your 360 feedback - a window on your awareness

Why you need to listen to your 360 feedback - a window on your awareness | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
"Why do you see the speck that is in your brother’s eye, when you do not see the plank in your own?"

This famous phrase from the Gospel of Luke captures a basic truth: what we see in others, we cannot or do not want to see in ourselves.

We all have blind spots, and we all need to improve our self-awareness. I still remember an innocent joke played on me when I was in first grade. As is traditional on April 1st, someone stuck a little paper fish to my back: all my classmates saw it and laughed, except me. It sounds like such a trivial thing, but the feeling that you are unaware of what others are thinking, that they know something about you that you do not, is powerful and destabilizing. A lack of awareness makes us insecure.
David Hain's insight:

How to grow - share feedback, expose yourself, wait for reciprocation --> new perspectives!

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David Hain's curator insight, May 20, 3:56 AM

If workplaces are essentially human endeavours, relationships are critical. So everyone should study the Johari Window and act on it!

Yvan's curator insight, May 21, 12:03 AM
So right
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10 Principles of Strategic Leadership

10 Principles of Strategic Leadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Most companies have leaders with the strong operational skills needed to maintain the status quo. But they are facing a critical deficit: They lack people in positions of power with the know-how, experience, and confidence required to tackle what management scientists call “wicked problems.” Such problems can’t be solved by a single command, they have causes that seem incomprehensible and solutions that seem uncertain, and they often require companies to transform the way they do business. Every enterprise faces these kinds of challenges today.

A 2015 PwC study of 6,000 senior executives, conducted using a research methodology developed by David Rooke of Harthill Consulting and William Torbert of Boston University, revealed just how pervasive this shortfall is. Respondents were asked a series of open-ended questions; their answers revealed their leadership preferences, which were then analyzed to determine which types of leaders were most prominent. Only 8 percent of the respondents turned out to be strategic leaders, or those effective at leading transformations (Rooke and Torbert refer to them as “strategist” leaders).
David Hain's insight:

There ain't many strategist thinkers out there, according to adult development research!  Some sound principles here to address the issue.

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Ian Berry's curator insight, May 20, 6:16 PM
Good insights My favourite is "make it safe to fail"
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Attracting the right talent isn’t just about the money

Attracting the right talent isn’t just about the money | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
1] Do employees see a sense of purpose in their work?
2] Do they feel a sense of social recognition and pride beyond monetary reward?
3] Does the workplace forge a sense of community and belonging?

Failing to take these non-monetary elements into consideration can mean that many employers are aren’t attracting the right people, or worse, paying way more than they need to keep the wrong crew aboard.  

So it isn’t just about the money; Meaning can go a long way in building the right team.
David Hain's insight:

How does your workplace measure up to the talent chat lenses? It's not about the money, money, money...

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Take Your Leadership off Autopilot

Take Your Leadership off Autopilot | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Autopilot is about habit. It’s about operating based on habit rather than consciously responding to the situation and circumstances surrounding you. When you are in autopilot mode, it’s like you have blinders on; you miss many signs, symptoms, and opportunities. Autopilot plays a role in every area of our lives. It becomes particularly concerning when it starts to impact the behaviors of leaders. So, how can you take your leadership off autopilot?
David Hain's insight:

Challenging habits - how do you do against these 3 tests? Good challenge from Liz Stincelli @infinitestin.

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How to go from good to great | London Business School

How to go from good to great | London Business School | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
What turns a manager into a leader? Professor of Organisational Behaviour, Randall S Peterson, suggests some answers.
David Hain's insight:

How to accelerate your personal leadership development. Not surprisingly, self-awareness, strengths and values feature heavily!

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Radical Wisdom for a Company, a School, a Life

What if your job didn’t control your life? Brazilian CEO Ricardo Semler practices a radical form of corporate democracy, rethinking everything from board meetings to how workers report their vacation days (they don’t have to). 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
David Hain's insight:

All leaders should review Semlers work, even if they disagree with it!

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David Hain's curator insight, December 4, 2015 8:06 AM

Required viewing to make you think, even if you don't go a quarter as far as Semler has!

Hector Cortez's curator insight, March 23, 12:19 AM

Required viewing to make you think, even if you don't go a quarter as far as Semler has!

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 14, 10:23 AM
His book Maverick is a great read. He proposes sitting together, talking with each other, and listening to each other. The corporate rules are 21 captioned cartoons.
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Leadership “Harem” Style

Leadership “Harem” Style | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Harem management was a type of leadership that fostered a strong undercurrent of political influence. It is synonymous with the politicisation of some organisations, where various shadow individuals or groups compete fiercely for power. Harems were often directed behind the scenes by a sultan’s female relatives, particularly the all-powerful mother, known as the Valide Sultan. And then there were the eunuchs. They could be lowly servants, or rise to become third in command after the Sultan and the Grand Vizier; and often had the trust, and the ear, of the sultan.

Reflecting on his own predicament, Edward could see how his CEO obtained some benefits from this harem-oriented way of running Serail Corporation. Why should he get rid of a person if he or she had still some use? Why annoy them by taking them off the executive committee?

While the CEO paid lip service to the advantages of teamwork, he clearly preferred working with members bilaterally. They all liked to have a direct reporting relationship with their boss. By keeping the roles of the people reporting to him ambiguous, he was assured that the information he needed would flow up. In addition, by keeping his “harem” he had reserves at hand in case one of the harem members became fed up with the situation. In the meantime, everyone in the company would be at his beck and call, vying for his attention.
David Hain's insight:

Useful piece form Kets De Vries on the dysfunctionality of harem leadership and how to spot it.

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What Business Leaders Can Learn from Generals

What Business Leaders Can Learn from Generals | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The military approaches peacetime with risk management and wartime with uncertainty management. To operate amid uncertainty, managers become leaders and more autonomy is given to troops to ensure agility and resilience.
David Hain's insight:

Some useful insights on how to handle uncertainty.

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Ambiguous Leadership Undermines Compliance

Ambiguous Leadership Undermines Compliance | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

The problem of symbolic compliance brought about by conflicting pressures on business. 

Situations can happen inside organisations where lower-level managers may find themselves trying to meet the expectations of different levels of leadership.  While the CEO and board usually have a goal in mind, they may not have set out a strategy as to how to reach it. This ambiguity gives managers further down the chain room to consider what is important to them. In some cases the end result may be very different from the spirit of the original target.

David Hain's insight:

How coherent and cohesive are your expoectations, goals and strategy? If not, expect contradictory results!

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10 'emotional intelligence' questions to ask leadership candidates 

10 'emotional intelligence' questions to ask leadership candidates  | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Jack Welch, former chairman of General Electric, sums it up succinctly: “No doubt, emotional intelligence is rarer than book smarts, but my experience says it is actually more important in the making of a leader. You just can’t ignore it. Emotional intelligence (EI) a far better predictor of success in a role and with a company than intelligence quotient (IQ) and expertise

 

Daniel Goleman, renowned author and psychologist, analyzed jobs at 121 organizations and found 67 percent of the 181 competencies that distinguish best performers are EI competencies.

 

In my more than 20 years of experience as an executive recruiter, I have found the best insights are gleaned through well-worded interview questions. These questions elicit answers that can be compared with your organization’s desired level of EI for the executive team.

David Hain's insight:

Sussing out EQ with useful interview questions. Could beadapted for day to day work.

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Authentis Formations's curator insight, May 12, 3:49 AM
L'intelligence émotionnelle devient incontournable...
Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, May 13, 2:16 AM
10 'emotional intelligence' questions to ask leadership candidates
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The Communication Guide For Leaders Who Aren't Sure What's Coming Next

The Communication Guide For Leaders Who Aren't Sure What's Coming Next | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

When we don't have enough information, our brains seek "cognitive closure." Much of the time, it doesn't end well.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
David Hain's insight:

Working out the inherent contradictions of lid and still being able to make a decision is a critical skill in leading through complexity.

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Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, April 18, 8:33 AM
Very interesting subject to be considered and discussed. I will disclose the post to my contacts and subscribers in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com
Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, April 25, 1:34 PM
Very interesting subject to be considered and discussed. I will disclose the post to my contacts and subscribers in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com
Ken Donaldson's curator insight, May 11, 6:38 AM
The Communication Guide For Leaders Who Aren't Sure What's Coming Next
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Leadership - News - Football development – UEFA.org

Leadership - News - Football development – UEFA.org | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

We have all been subjected to unconscious bias in the workplace and it is our responsibility to change that mindset: that was the message coming from keynote speeches and panel discussions at UEFA's Women in Football Leadership Programme in Nyon.

The message was consistent from contributors representing different and varied backgrounds, on the second day of the week-long course.

David Hain's insight:

More on changing the unconscious bias mindset - but when will it happen?

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Leadership at Deloitte Consulting: A Culture of Collaborative Advantage

Leadership at Deloitte Consulting: A Culture of Collaborative Advantage | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Since Foutty’s December 7, 2015 promotion, she has delivered her vision of the firm—collective unity and individual professional longevity through fulfillment—via direct personal interactions whenever possible. Of course, written communication is inevitably necessary in which case Foutty carries into it her stance that “intimacy is of utmost importance.” She has a very deliberate fireside style that promotes three primary messages:

“Strategic choices in time and career management must inevitably be made, but health and family are at the forefront;
Assume and expect positive, glass-half-full, intent in all your interactions; and
Take a step back and know ... [as leaders], your only job is to ensure everyone is as successful as possible.”
What’s more, she enjoys great personal vigor and fervor recounting the triumphs and knowledge gained by asking for help and portrays doing so as a strategic asset.
David Hain's insight:

Interesting 'Big4' leader profile.

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 11, 10:59 AM

We are in a collaborative economy so the prize goes to those agile and intentional enough to embrace it.

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I took a gap year, and I can trace every professional success back to it.

I took a gap year, and I can trace every professional success back to it. | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Taking a breather in the race from one educational milestone to the next opens your mind and exposes you to new ideas; that's what we need as individuals and as nations. Robert Redford's Lions for Lambs proposes a policy I'd make item one on my platform if I ever ran for something. 
David Hain's insight:

How a gap year can make all the difference to a life of purpose!

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Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.