Coaching Leaders
Follow
Find
42.5K views | +106 today
 
Scooped by David Hain
onto Coaching Leaders
Scoop.it!

Leadership and the Spirit of Being Alive and Kicking *#* #HRockstars

Leadership and the Spirit of Being Alive and Kicking *#* #HRockstars | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

What if the issue with leadership was leadership itself?

By that I mean a plethora of experts offering daily tips to fix leaders and organizations.  Not to mention the many books and blogs that push information adding to our collective noise.

What these experts choose to do is engage in noise-making rather than create true meaning?


David Hain's insight:

James Bond discovers Open Space - and loves it!

more...
Ricard Lloria's comment, April 29, 2014 11:02 AM
James Bond it´s a perfect leadership in all the projects. Thank you for your curation David.
Coaching Leaders
Helping leaders to develop themselves and others
Curated by David Hain
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Are you ready to decide? | McKinsey

Are you ready to decide? | McKinsey | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Good managers—even great ones—can make spectacularly bad choices. Some of them result from bad luck or poor timing, but a large body of research suggests that many are caused by cognitive and behavioral biases. While techniques to “debias” decision making do exist, it’s often difficult for executives, whose own biases may be part of the problem, to know when they are worth applying. In this article, we propose a simple, checklist-based approach that can help flag times when the decision-making process may have gone awry and interventions are necessary. Our early research, which we explain later, suggests that is the case roughly 75 percent of the time.
David Hain's insight:

McKinsey decision making tool helps to de-bias your personal foibles

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Ketchum Leadership Survey: The Rise of the Title-less Leader

Ketchum Leadership Survey: The Rise of the Title-less Leader | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
A new Ketchum leadership study of more than 6,000 respondents in 12 countries reveals people are looking more to employees at all levels for leadership instead of just those at the top of the org chart. According to the fourth-annual Ketchum Leadership Communication Monitor (KLCM), 41 percent of respondents believe leadership should come mainly from the organization and all its employees, compared with 25 percent that believe leadership should come only from the CEO.

This aligns with three years of KLCM data pointing to the demise of the CEO-as-celebrity leadership style and highlights a greater-than-ever opportunity for "leadership by all" – a collaborative and communicative culture that empowers employees at every level.

While the CEO, board and senior management still play an important role, the study suggests that employees throughout an organization can and should provide leadership. The survey identified the top five traits of an effective leader: leading by example (63 percent), communicating in an open and transparent way (61 percent), admitting mistakes (59 percent), bringing out the best in others (58 percent), and handling controversial issues or crises calmly and confidently (58 percent). These are traits that every CEO should possess, and also ones that every good employee would have.
David Hain's insight:

How gradist is your organisation? If it is, chances are you are missing out on the benefits of leadership from the many...

more...
Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, Today, 5:19 AM

some good leadership traits identified here: and remember leadership happens at all levels!

Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Leadership Is In Crisis Management Mode

Leadership Is In Crisis Management Mode | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Leadership is not a popularity contest that is influenced by political and hidden agendas. It is a unique privilege and duty that requires one to stay on top of their game to assure that they are continuously investing in themselves; that they are always adding value and making those around them better.   The hard work that is leadership should never be taken for granted.
David Hain's insight:

Nice leadership rant from Glenn Lopis!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

3 Leadership Traits Your Employees Need to Exhibit When You Aren’t Around - Linked 2 Leadership

3 Leadership Traits Your Employees Need to Exhibit When You Aren’t Around - Linked 2 Leadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Whether you’re out of the office or your team members are out in the field, they must be able to step into leadership roles and make decisions that will result in positive customer outcomes.

And when something goes awry, your employees need to:

Be prepared to find solutions
Placate frustrated customers
And ultimately turn a potential disaster into a nonissue
This requires that each and every team member is properly prepared to lead with responsibility.

Cultivating a sense of personal responsibility among your team members isn’t just good for your company; it also helps your employees grow.
David Hain's insight:

You're only ever as good as the people who hold the fort when you're not around. Set the right standards!

more...
Joe Boutte's curator insight, July 1, 8:08 AM

If your team doesn't know what to do when you aren't around, you've failed as a leader.  The world needs everyday leaders who are autonomous, but understand their leader's vision, intent, and expectations to create the output and outcomes required.

Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The Virgin Way

A review of some of the strategies and practices of The Virgin Group and observations on the leadership approach of Sir Richard Branson
David Hain's insight:

Informative take on the leadership workings of Branson, from Peter Cook @AcademyOfRock

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Tips to Resist a Controlling Corporate Culture - Rebel Jam June 2015

Do you feel constrained by your organization and its culture? Do you want more space to push forward innovative ideas, and feel better at work? Here are a few tips, taken from my experience. Hope they help!
David Hain's insight:

Celine Schillinger on staying an amoeba and resting the box! Excess of control kills innovation and engagement!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

4 Questions That Help Build a Winning Leadership Team

4 Questions That Help Build a Winning Leadership Team | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
In the SEALs, whenever we were on patrol, there were three fundamental questions each operator would constantly ask himself:

Is my gun up?
Where would I go if we were contacted by the enemy?
How can I support my buddy?
Of course, asking the same questions over and over for hours on end gets monotonous, so the occasional, “How am I going to beat the next level in HALO?” question would surreptitiously sneak in, too.

The takeaway here is this. What questions -- when asked repeatedly -- breed relevance and avoid obsolescence? In other words, what questions never get old, continue to foster growth, and directly apply to every situation?

If delivering value every day is part of your organizational “menu,” consider these four questions to drive perpetual leadership development:
David Hain's insight:

Attain? Train? Sustain? Retain? 4 key leadership questions from Jeff Boss

more...
Dr. Deborah Brennan's curator insight, June 29, 8:19 AM

Leaders must have the will -skills can be taught...so true for struggling schools!

Ian Berry's curator insight, June 29, 7:07 PM

4 great questions and a great premise that the right questions never get old

Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Wacky leadership ideas that worked

Wacky leadership ideas that worked | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

What unconventioIt really is lonely at the top—especially for CEOs who desire leadership training.

According to a 2013 study conducted by the Stanford Graduate School of Business and the Miles Group, nearly 100 percent of CEOs welcome coaching and leadership advice, yet nearly two-thirds didn't receive any. The study indicated that nearly half of senior-level executives also lack leadership coaching.

Maybe part of the problem is that staid leadership methods don't work. Once a surefire recipe for execs to nod off while counting down the hours to lunch, leadership training no longer means status quo PowerPoint slides and dry motivational speeches.

David Hain's insight:

What unconventional methods have worked for your leadership development?  For me, it was volunteering...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

DR. CUMMINGS: The ‘Five Leadership Laws’

DR. CUMMINGS: The ‘Five Leadership Laws’ | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
If anybody looks up to you, you’re a leader. If anybody follows your directions, or your ideas, or even your hunches, no matter who you are, you have to consider this reality: You’re a leader. If you’re a parent or a teacher or a pastor or a rabbi or a deputy who stops speeding cars on the freeway, you’re leading other people. If your peer group at work seeks you out and asks your opinion, you don’t need titles -- you’re a leader.

But how good of a leader are you? Think about the people who consider you their leader (even though it may be difficult for you to visualize this). Think about the many moments during the day when you come face to face with them, or maybe communicate by email. Think about your interactions, your words, your gestures, your body language and how these people react to you. Now answer the questions that follow these Five Leadership Laws:
David Hain's insight:

One man's Five Laws of Leadership.  What would your  laws be?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Do you challenge your staff out of their comfort zone?

Do you challenge your staff out of their comfort zone? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
As an employer I want my staff to enjoy what they do for a living. I know that a more engaged workforce is more productive and more loyal and that this means businesses benefit from greater profitability. It also results in lower rates of absenteeism and better staff retention, leading to lower recruitment and training costs and greater continuity for customers. 
I believe the desire to create a contented workforce is admirable but business owners and managers need to be careful - if contentment stifles ambition in large numbers, a business will struggle to develop its full potential and that won’t benefit anyone. 
David Hain's insight:

Risk aversion and dependency are bad habits to get into. Are you unwittingly breeding them?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Our Projects Are Our Journey and Our Life

Our Projects Are Our Journey and Our Life | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
“I believe we were born to be happy and that all the projects we realize together in our collective journey can AND MUST contribute to a greater happiness for all of us.”

 All projects carry the same complexity and issues as any individual or collective endeavor in our lives. Our projects are our journey, and our life.This is a compass we bought recently for our 5-year-old granddaughter Stéphanie. We will save it until she is ready to go out on her own. The inscription is the most important piece of advice we can share to guide her on the many projects that will come and go the rest of her life.   
Projects, be they business or personal matters, all follow the same patterns.
David Hain's insight:

Heartfelt piece from experienced project guy @Claude Emond, HT @justcoachit

more...
Claude Emond's comment, June 23, 11:21 AM
Thanks for scooping this David. Cheers from Montreal
David Hain's comment, June 23, 11:24 AM
My pleasure Claude, it was excellent! Merci a vous!
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Heidrick & Struggles on the changing nature of leadership

Heidrick & Struggles on the changing nature of leadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The world is increasingly volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous. What does that mean for leaders? In this interview, Tracy Wolstencroft, chief executive officer of global executive-search firm Heidrick & Struggles, discusses with McKinsey’s Rik Kirkland the implications the changing world has for the art and science of leadership and what companies are looking for in potential executives. An edited transcript follows.
David Hain's insight:

The more you can convey that inner sense of integrity & authenticity,  the more folks will give you the benefit of the doubt. Tracy Wolstencraft

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

3 Actions Legendary Leaders Take to Get Ahead ~ Switch & Shift

3 Actions Legendary Leaders Take to Get Ahead ~ Switch & Shift | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The writing is on the wall: “Adapt, evolve, thrive… or get out of the way.”

For many of us, the greatest barrier we face is internal. Our habits – our way of thinking, communicating and doing, for example – keep us stuck where we are now. We become frustrated. We spend too much time on unfruitful efforts. We do not evolve.

And yet we resist change.

It isn’t until something dramatic happens – the departure of a valued colleague, the loss of a long-time client, a severe decrease in market share or share value, or perhaps even health issues – that with new eyes we see change for what it is: the solution, not the problem.

Here are a few powerful, practical ways to adapt, evolve, and thrive; proven ways to use the changes, challenges and opportunities before us as a catalyst that reveal your greatest potential as a leader.
David Hain's insight:

Irene Becker @justcoachit on how to build your 3Q edge. 'Change is not the problem, but the solution!'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Identify your context and build everything around it

Identify your context and build everything around it | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
According to Lynda Gratton, work is no longer being defined by HR, but rather by ‘context’, which is created by the emergence of megatrends and their impact on society: “Work is being shaped by technology, globalisation, democracy and the ageing workforce, and the opportunity you have to make work as you want it,” she tells me.
“We are now faced with a “hollowing out” of work – medium-skilled jobs have disappeared and are being replaced by technology, so there’s either low-paid work or specialised high-paid work, with a huge emphasis on education and lifelong learning.”
And because people lie at the heart of corporate purpose, this means that organisations must build a context to innovate and excite them – which, for Gratton, presents a huge opportunity for HR to be positioned as ‘enabler’ and ‘inspirer’.
David Hain's insight:

What should HR leaders do if they don’t have a seat at the table? “Leave. It’s not a place you want to be in. I think HR has to be courageous about that,” ~ Lynda Gratton

more...
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, June 19, 10:29 AM

Absolutely true. HR should be the heart of a company, not the stepchild but it has been commandeered over the last 2 decades. They need to become proactive advocates for change.

Ian Berry's curator insight, June 19, 6:17 PM

Like this from the article 

"For Gratton, ‘context’ is made up of three layers: your corporation, your supply chain, and those who support your organisation in the outer world. Successful leadership in this new era of work is about engaging with those three levels.

 “As we enter this new era of work, where change is the norm and employees and customers are seeking greater transparency, organisations must endeavour to help every employee be as good as they can be,” she says."

Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

5 Leadership Lessons From the NBA Champion Golden State Warriors

5 Leadership Lessons From the NBA Champion Golden State Warriors | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
A rookie coach and a band of upstarts defy the odds. Here's what you can learn from their success.
David Hain's insight:

'If you aim for B-level performance, that's the highest you'll ever achieve. Shoot for the stars, and you just might do something great.' ~ Justin Bariso

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Kirk Kerkorian, the Modest Mogul Who Quietly Built Vegas, Dies at 98

Kirk Kerkorian, the Modest Mogul Who Quietly Built Vegas, Dies at 98 | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
In six decades of dealmaking in Las Vegas, Kerkorian built the world’s largest hotel three times. He shunned the spotlight, rarely granted interviews, and let his actions do most of his talking. He remained off stage not because he was a drug-addled, psychological wreck like Howard Hughes, the man to whom he’s most often compared, but because bragging just wasn’t his style. In the land of gaudy resorts and blaring casino bosses, the only thing occasionally loud about Kerkorian were his sports jackets.
David Hain's insight:

In memory of the man who built Las Vegas.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Leadership: Why a perennial issue?

Leadership: Why a perennial issue? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Why is leadership a perennial issue?

For the third year in a row, leadership soared to become one of the most pressing talent challenges faced by global organizations. Nearly 9 out of 10 global HR and business leaders (86 percent) cited leadership as a top issue. Fully 50 percent of respondents in our survey rated their leadership shortfalls as “very important.” Yet only 6 percent of organizations believe their leadership pipeline is “very ready”—pointing to a staggering capability gap. (See figure 1 for capability gaps across regions and selected countries). Respondents’ overall capability gap in leadership, which has grown in magnitude since last year (figure 2),1 is striking, considering that leadership program spending has increased compared to last year.2
David Hain's insight:

If nearly every company recognizes leadership as a critical talent problem, why are so few companies making any progress? ~ Deloitte POV

more...
Ian Berry's curator insight, June 19, 1:57 AM

A key reason we're failing to make progress is only focusing leadership development on executives and designated leaders rather than focusing on everyone. Self-leadership is everyone's business and is the starting place to leading for others.

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, June 19, 10:36 AM

I totally agree with Deloitte's question here? So few companies have any type of career planning for anyone in the organization. It is a part of leadership that must begin to get traction. Planning for succession is one thing but open, transparent career planning is another.

Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Wildest-Dreams Leadership

Wildest-Dreams Leadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Eight hundred years ago, on June 15, a number of British barons presented their king with a written document they wanted him to sign, guaranteeing them their rights. King John (of Robin Hood fame) signed – and the Magna Carta was born.

Why is this event, eight centuries ago, a leadership-teaching moment?

After all the signing of the charter was just a small group of people getting together, addressing a very specific set of problems and unknowingly planting the seeds of something huge that would occur in the future. Of course the British nobles wanted relief from the king’s tyranny. But they set something into motion that would be greater than they could have imagined at the moment of signing. Beyond their wildest dreams.
David Hain's insight:

Magna Carta - an amazing story that has lasted 800 years and counting!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Putting CEO Pay in an International Context

Putting CEO Pay in an International Context | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The Wall Street Journal reports that the pay gap between CEOs and rank-and-file workers at big American banks has narrowed in recent years. However, the leaders still made 124 times the average worker’s salary in 2014. The heads of five top banks made $18.5 million on average.

The huge pay packages of major players in the corporate and financial worlds are the subject of a lot of outrage, but they’re also a matter of great interest to economists and management researchers. Why would for-profit organizations, which generally try to keep costs as low as they can, pay so much to an individual employee?
David Hain's insight:

The dubious (IMHO) assumptions behind CEO reward in the West!

more...
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, June 17, 11:19 AM

I would love to see a follow-up study completed. With the impact of the crash has there been any major shifts either way. With the massive growth in millionaires and billionaires in the last decade there will be some interesting insights that could come out of it. In 2011 someone projected the number of millionaires would grow by 72.5% by 2020 to 68.5 million worldwide.

Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Deflategate, Shmategate: Aren't We All Cheaters Anyway?

Deflategate, Shmategate: Aren't We All Cheaters Anyway? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
So Why Do We Cheat?

Anyone might bend, break, or stomp on the rules for any reason—from the pursuit of glory to the eternal and subconscious quest to fill the void left by the absence of parental love. But some identifiable factors appear at play:
David Hain's insight:

'We’re impressed by people who push the envelope.

But we cry foul when a toe goes over the murky, always shifting line.' ~ Alex Nunes

more...
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, June 17, 10:56 AM

This is a tough issue because one of the first rules of business is to push the envelope so you can gain a competitive edge. Have we become so focused on catching people crossing the line that we begin to slide backwards? Integrity should be the foundation of sports and business and that means that we push to the line but don't cross it. It also means that we accept responsibility & accountability if someone should challenge, not blame someone else. Unfortunately, too many are jumping on the finger pointing band wagon so they avoid being viewed themselves.

Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

How managers are killing the productivity of their employees

How managers are killing the productivity of their employees | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Over the past few years, I’ve watched as my company evolved from an early-stage, scrappy startup to an established tech company. As Okta has transitioned, so has my role. I’ve gone from being extremely hands-on and getting most of the work done myself, to charting the course and navigating the industry. Nowadays, my role is to collect information from customers, employees, and industry leaders and get out of everyone else’s way.

In other words, it’s my job to not have work to do. I think of it as constantly working myself out of a job — any time I’m a bottleneck, or someone is reliant on me for something, I’m making the entire company less productive. Just like some of my co-workers want to end the day with “Inbox zero” my goal is to reach “Work zero.” My company’s productivity is my ultimate priority, and anytime I take away from that productivity, I’m taking away from Okta’s success.
David Hain's insight:

Forget being the best technician - take on the adaptive challenge of being the best at letting your people go, but helping them to make meaning!

more...
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The Linchpins of Leadership

The Linchpins of Leadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
During the past decade, I have trained more than 5,000 federal executives in leadership and executive core competencies, coached political appointees, and worked with roughly 400 executives entering into the Senior Executive Service (SES) or SES Candidate Development Programs. Hearing the stories of these leaders has given me a unique perspective into the federal leadership world. My conclusion: successful leadership depends on trust, credibility, and respect.
David Hain's insight:

More on being human- what it gains and why you need it in any walk of life!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Five-Click Leadership: How Introverts Can Get Ahead

Five-Click Leadership: How Introverts Can Get Ahead | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The CEO of a major multinational came to class and told us that as an introverted leader, he had to put his “game face” on whenever he left his floor. If you want to be the CEO of a big company, he said, you need to act like an extrovert at times. To do this, he shared one of his techniques, which he called “Five-Click Leadership.”

When he was a senior executive in the running to be the CEO in the not too distant future, his firm arranged for a leadership coach to help him. The coach introduced him to the technique: at least five times during the day, he was to approach coworkers and engage them in a friendly interaction, something a bit contrary to his natural disposition. He logged these encounters on a clicker he carried around with him, hence the name “Five-Click”. Introverts are somewhat less apt to just talk to people when they get in an elevator, but he was encouraged to do so — nothing profound, just a “good morning” and a comment on the weather.
David Hain's insight:

The extraordinisation of the mundane - or maybe just being human?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Why Special Ops Stopped Relying So Much on Top-Down Leadership

Why Special Ops Stopped Relying So Much on Top-Down Leadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
When Fredrick Winslow Taylor designed the world’s first modern assembly line and forever changed industry, persuasion was the last thing on his mind. Taylor believed assembly line workers simply needed clear direction on how to execute prescribed tasks. His belief, which manifested in both physical design and organizational structures during the decades that followed, was that the human factor should be removed from the production equation to the greatest extent possible. Stopwatch and measuring tape in hand, Taylor designed and advocated for systems that maximized efficiency and predictability through vertical integration and top-down control. And with that, the 20th century’s great quest for bureaucratic efficiency began.

Taylor’s approach, and the hierarchical models that it created, were the dominant force of the 20th Century. His influence can be found in everything from factory floors to Fortune 500 org-charts. But when the information age arrived, it brought with it networks of globally distributed individuals suddenly able to connect across boundaries, share information at light-speed, rapidly attract new members, and create seemingly leaderless action at a pace that put traditional bureaucracies to shame.
David Hain's insight:

An ex-SEAL explains how Special Ops learned to lead from the middle after 9:11.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The Power of Focus. The Start-Up Files #4

The Power of Focus.                                     The Start-Up Files #4 | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The very best businesses usually grow up around a single idea. A mindset. Something to be revered. An elegant solution to a problem. The further most businesses get from the original idea, the worse they generally become.

But the temptation is always there. If we do this, we can get these clients over there too. More clients is better! More money is better! It's usually not too hard to talk ourselves into this sort of thing. 

I'm here to tell you - stop it. Stop trying to be the solution to everyone's problem. 
David Hain's insight:

"Focus is about saying No! " ~ Steve Jobs


more...
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 29, 11:57 AM

Focus is the new mantra for business today. What is your point of view on the subject? Do you really care?

Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.