Coaching Leaders
Follow
Find
33.6K views | +6 today
 
Scooped by David Hain
onto Coaching Leaders
Scoop.it!

Are Your Beliefs Keeping You Stuck?

Are Your Beliefs Keeping You Stuck? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Are the things you believe about yourself, others, and the world rooted in reality or do they only exist in your head? This is a question worth asking when you find yourself stuck.
David Hain's insight:

Fine article about our capacity to self-limit and how it can become a self-fulfilling prophecy.

more...
No comment yet.
Coaching Leaders
Helping leaders to develop themselves and others
Curated by David Hain
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

"Four facets of leadership I've learned from heroes," by military leader Matthew T. Fritz

"Four facets of leadership I've learned from heroes," by military leader Matthew T. Fritz | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

It goes without saying that the military environment is unique, but not so unique that effective parallels cannot be drawn between business and society at large.

In fact, in 2013, the U.S. Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff offered that it was the responsibility of military leaders to learn “how to connect the warrior to the citizen.” His charge was for military members to share stories and, in return, listen to the different perspectives of fellow citizens and learn from them.  As a result, it is an honor to share with you the facets of leadership I have learned from observing my leaders, mentors and peers over 20-years of service.

I come to you not as an expert, but as a student—a lifelong student—eager to share my insights on these important facets.

David Hain's insight:

Great leadership advice from someone who has - literally - been at the sharp end!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Hain from Mediocre Me
Scoop.it!

Great Leadership Isn’t About You

Great Leadership Isn’t About You | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The best leaders are supportive.

Via John Michel
David Hain's insight:

"When the best leaders work is done, the people say - we did it ourselves" - LaoTzu

more...
John Michel's curator insight, August 22, 8:30 PM

The most effective form of leadership is supportive. It is collaborative. It is never assigning a task, role or function to another that we ourselves would not be willing to perform. For all practical purposes, leading well is as simple as remembering to remain others-centered instead of self-centered. To do this, I try to keep these four imperatives in mind:

Amy Melendez's curator insight, August 26, 9:53 PM

From the article:

The lesson Washington’s profoundly positive example teaches is that leading people well isn’t about driving them, directing them, or coercing them; it is about compelling them to join you in pushing into new territory. It is motivating them to share your enthusiasm for pursuing a shared ideal, objective, cause, or mission. In essence, it is to always conduct yourself in ways that communicates to others that you believe people are always more important than things.

Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The Only Teacher is Self-Awareness

The Only Teacher is Self-Awareness | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Eckhart Tolle refers to the “watcher” of our experience. Think of the watcher as the “witness” of your experience – neutral, objective, non-judgmental.


As the watcher, you are compelled to decide whether the thing you are observing about yourself aligns with the person you want to be. Does it align with your integrity, your values, your purpose, your passion, with the core of who you are?

And sometimes it forces you to acknowledge you haven’t defined your integrity, your values, your purpose, your passion or the core of who you are.

Yes, it takes great skill to develop self-awareness. It is a continuous process that takes commitment to do the emotional work involved. In the process, we’ll experience discomfort, resistance and sometimes even pain. But we will also experience new depths of freedom, authenticity, connection and peace that will be their own reward.

Thanks for reading and taking the time to comment, subscribe, share, like and tweet this article. It’s appreciated.

Louise Altman

David Hain's insight:

Excellent riff on self awareness by Louis Altman @intentionalcomm - well worth reading and reflecting!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Hain from Making #love and making personal #branding #leadership
Scoop.it!

What Do All Mentally Tough People Do? By Chris Gaborit

What Do All Mentally Tough People Do? By Chris Gaborit | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

In all of these different contexts, one characteristic emerged as a predictor for success. It wasn't social intelligence, good looks, IQ, or physical health. It was "grit," which the dictionary also defines as "mentally toughness."

 

Duckworth describes this quality in successful people as "perseverance and passion to achieve long-term goals; having stamina; sticking with your future day in and day out and working hard to make that future a reality; a marathon not a sprint.”


Her studies have shown that there is a correlation between mental toughness and self-control. To achieve those long-term goals there are things mentally tough people avoid. Here are seven of those:


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor, Ricard Lloria
more...
Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 18, 5:37 PM

The seven things common to everyone who displays psychological fortitude.


What is mental toughness? Is mental toughness essential to high achievement? What do mentally tough people avoid?

Rescooped by David Hain from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

Fixing a Work Relationship Gone Sour

Fixing a Work Relationship Gone Sour | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

The good news is that even some of the most strained relationships can be repaired. In fact, a negative relationship turned positive can be a very strong one. “Going through difficult experiences can be the makings of the strongest, most resilient relationships,” says Susan David, a founder of the Harvard/McLean Institute of Coaching and author of the HBR article, “Emotional Agility.” The bad news is that fixing a relationship takes serious effort.


“Most people just lower their expectations because it’s easier than dealing with the real issues at hand,” says Brian Uzzi, professor of leadership and organizational change at Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management and author of the HBR article, “Make Your Enemies Your Allies.” But, he says, the hard work is often worth it, especially in a work environment where productivity and performance are at stake. Here’s how to transform a work relationship that’s turned sour.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
more...
Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 20, 3:27 PM

Sometimes you get stuck in a rut with someone at work — a boss, a coworker, a direct report. Perhaps there’s bad blood between you or you simply haven’t been getting along. What can you do to turn the relationship around? Is it possible to start anew?

Rescooped by David Hain from Lead With Giants Scoops
Scoop.it!

The Biggest Myths About Vulnerability

The Biggest Myths About Vulnerability | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
» The Biggest Myths About Vulnerability | "…on the shoulder of giants."

Via Dan Forbes
David Hain's insight:

It is a sign of a true leader if you can be open, transparent, and vulnerable, as trusting a person as you would expect your team members to be. ~ @CheriEsner #LeadWithGiants

more...
Dan Forbes's curator insight, August 19, 4:20 AM

“Why vulnerability is the first thing you look for in other people, but the last thing you want to reveal in yourself.”  -Brene Brown - See more at: http://www.leadwithgiants.com/leadership/the-biggest-myths-about-vulnerability/#sthash.I2It87CC.dpuf

Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, August 19, 10:09 AM

I think, this vulnerability concept (what I strongly undersign and admire e.g. in the Getting naked from Lencioni) is simply deductible from the even more basic "requirement" for an ideal leader: his/her credibility and authenticity... that he/she walks as he/she talks... like to show his/her real here and now state... that is an interesting point whether an inspiring leader while he is credible and authentic in the here and now has also a sort of obligation to show courage in spite of all the difficulties they should face... I think that the attitude should be there... that is also a part of his credibility...

Rescooped by David Hain from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Why you should learn to love feedback.

Why you should learn to love feedback. | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

It's no secret that many people avoid feedback like it's a plague. 

The more frequent the feedback, the easier it is to learn and improve


Via donhornsby, Les Howard, Gust MEES
David Hain's insight:

Without great feedback loops, it's really hard to grow intelligently - so why is are they in short supply in so many organisations?

more...
donhornsby's curator insight, July 29, 5:46 AM

(From the article): With more information flowing via computers and the Internet, there is now, more-not-less-demand for every manager to provide accurate and frequent feedback to every employee.  People want to know exactly what they need to do to perform well on the job. 

Gust MEES's curator insight, August 18, 10:06 PM

The more frequent the feedback, the easier it is to learn and improve


Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Being of Service: The Bridge to Meaning and Mission

Being of Service: The Bridge to Meaning and Mission | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Being of service means becoming bigger than our normal selves and turning our focus to others - and it works the same way in business.
David Hain's insight:

When a business loses it's sense of mission and value creation, bad things happen ~ Gideon Rosenblatt.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Hain from Succes met je Talent
Scoop.it!

The 15 Biggest Body Language Mistakes To Watch Out For

The 15 Biggest Body Language Mistakes To Watch Out For | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Until we get to know someone, our brain relies on snap judgements to try to categorize the person, predict what they will do, and anticipate how we should react. You may have heard that you only have

Via Alexander Crépin
more...
donhornsby's curator insight, August 18, 3:57 AM

(From the article): If you discover you have a particular problem with one or two of the gestures on the list, practice by yourself with a mirror or with a friend who can remind you every time you do it, until you become aware of the bad habit yourself.

 

Can you recall a time someone’s body language made you uncomfortable? Are there any other body language blunders you would add? I’d love to hear your anecdotes and ideas in the comments below.

Javier Santana's curator insight, August 20, 7:34 AM

Los 15 errores más grandes de tu lenguaje corporalque debes tener en cuenta.

Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Who Benefits from Executive Coaching?

Who Benefits from Executive Coaching? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Recent research reveals that a systematic approach to executive coaching has a double benefit.
David Hain's insight:

Best coaching results when whole system is involved responsibly - implications for organisations.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The Difference Between Mentoring & Coaching

The Difference Between Mentoring & Coaching | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Each Friday, RPS highlights five popular news stories from the world of training professionals. Visit our blog each week to see which stories were trending amongst your industry peers. ASTD Mentoring Versus Coaching: What’s the Difference?
more...
Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, August 17, 5:20 AM

Well, it's good that we are speaking about this... I agree most of the points... though it's a good occasion to  raise one controversial point (controversial to me...)...

 

In this post you read about the "roles" in the two activities as follows:

 

Mentoring: Talking with a person who has identified his needs prior to entering into a mentoring relationship. The emphasis is on active listening, providing information, making suggestions, and establishing connections.Coaching: Talking to a person, identifying what he needs, and developing an action plan. The emphasis is on instruction, assessing, and monitoring.

 

Now, my point is that if something is not coaching, then, instruction is definitely not part of it.  And active listening which is - rightly because the good mentor works in coaching mode most of the time - enumerated as a mentoring feature is the one of the most important elements of the coaching process. I just want to show these two crying points which I firmly disagree.

 

By the way, it's more common than perhaps you think. In one of my favourite contingent management model, the situational leadership also the word "coaching" i sometimes wrongly handled. There are acc. to the model  4 phases of leadership: telling-selling-participating-delegating... now, sometimes for the "selling" (high task-high relationship/behaviour setup) one uses "coaching" which is - IMHO - flatly wrong. It is the phase when "mentoring" would much more appropriate (covering only a part of the mentoring job which is mainly toward career, etc). And, more or less it is the  "participating" phase (low task-high relationship/behaviour setup) which has rather much common features with the  coaching process, I would call it after that...

 

All the other points are rather fine...

 

Rescooped by David Hain from Leadership with a splash of empathy
Scoop.it!

The Irresistible Allure of Pre-crastination

The Irresistible Allure of Pre-crastination | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
What happens when we're desperate to get something — anything — done.

Via Roger Francis, Jose Luis Anzizar
David Hain's insight:

Had to post this now or I'll never get around to it!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The world's best leaders are cast as themselves in a play that never ends

The world's best leaders are cast as themselves in a play that never ends | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

One of Bennis’ ideas which has been largely overlooked in leadership studies is the connection he established between leadership and acting. Bennis argued that leaders, like actors, have to perform a role in order to inspire others. They have to engage followers by creating shared meaning. “Hitler is a ghastly example of this ability, and a reminder of the under-appreciated role that rhetoric and performance play in leadership,” Bennis once noted.

David Hain's insight:

Excellent short article, thanks @Rob Peters!

more...
Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, August 14, 7:38 AM

Yeah... and Lencioni has written a good whole book about this ("Getting naked")...

Rescooped by David Hain from Effective Leadership and Management
Scoop.it!

5 Things Successful Leaders Do in a Crisis

Running your own business can be difficult, and sooner or later it's going to test you. Here are the traits you'll need to remain a successful leader during those challenging times.


Via Stepped Leader
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Hain from Learning At Work
Scoop.it!

The 5 Different Types Of Intuition And How To Hone Yours

The 5 Different Types Of Intuition And How To Hone Yours | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Most of us rely on snap-judgments to form our views on people or situations around us. How can we make sure they're the right calls?


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Lynnette Van Dyke, Roger Francis
more...
Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, August 22, 10:20 AM

There are five types of intuition (you can find your type, here):


Analysts spend a lot of time researching and data-gathering before making a decision about a situation, and aren’t satisfied until every potential scenario is explored and played out. A snap judgement is always a poor judgement, to an “analyst.”


Observers gather clues, mostly visually, about the people and scenarios around them. If she passes a coworker in the hallway that won’t return their smile, the “observer” takes this subtlety to heart.


Questioners are more direct about their judgement-making. If they need to find the perfect venue for their company happy hour, they don’t rely on online reviews or appearances, but ask around for the group’s top pick. “Questioners” make real-life, evidence-based decisions, but neglects to pick up on unspoken cues.


Empathizers are quick to let colleagues and clients vent out their problems, and go with them emotionally to the source of the problem. Unfortunately, too much empathy skews their judgment when it’s time to make an unbiased call.


Adapters are the all-star intuitors, the Zoltar fortune teller of the office. They give the best advice, and you know you can go to them when things get hairy. But where they excel in gut-feelings, they struggle to relate with others who seem to gravitate toward poor choices.


Rescooped by David Hain from New Leadership
Scoop.it!

Leadership through conversations

Leadership through conversations | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

There is the adage, “Managers focus are results; leaders focus on people.” That really should be “leaders focus on results and people,” as in today’s hyper-competitive business environment, we must hit our financial goals or we may not keep our jobs. But how are we going to keep our good people energized and engaged if we don’t invest the time to know them as our team members and what is important to them?


Via donhornsby, Roger Francis
David Hain's insight:

In the end, we are all defined by our relationships - we only get our results through them, good or bad.

more...
donhornsby's curator insight, August 20, 8:05 AM

(From the article): Senior managers spend up to 50% of their time in meetings, and much of their remaining time speaking with each other, on calls, and in front of their computers. Most of their communication is through e-mails and or is delegated to those who report to them.


We have to free ourselves up. We have to make our meetings shorter, more efficient and more productive, and then take the time for conversations with our people.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 20, 3:11 PM

Leading and conversations are entangled. Pedagogy, as leading, is about engaging students in complex conversations about curricula. The curricula involved are planned and living. The latter belongs to the historical persons entering classrooms, including teachers, which filter the planned curricula.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, August 22, 1:20 AM

Those who has people on his charge should be both, task & relationship oriented... of course... This split was and is always  artificial (worth to read e.g. Mintzberg for details...:-)))

Rescooped by David Hain from Making #love and making personal #branding #leadership
Scoop.it!

#HR #RRHH #Teamwork Takes Work: 7 Ways to Play Nice With Others

#HR #RRHH #Teamwork Takes Work: 7 Ways to Play Nice With Others | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Remember your kindergarten report card, when you were evaluated on things like your ability to follow directions, name the colors, and sing the alphabet? It also included an early assessment of a skill that would influence your success for the rest of your life: the ability to "play well with others." The criteria were pretty basic at the time: share, wait your turn, don't hit or yell, help when someone is struggling. As you grow up, many of the same basic principles apply, but situations can be much more complicated for adults to play well together and still achieve desired results.

 

Context and personal needs often create internal conflict when trying to weigh the needs of the few against the good of the whole. And as a leader, sometimes you have to make a conscious choice to make others unhappy. Still, with a little finesse, you can meet objectives and still all play in a happy sandbox. You may not satisfy everyone all of the time, but then working together to resolve conflicts, rather than just being pleasant all of the time, can make a team stronger.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor, Ricard Lloria
more...
Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 19, 4:35 PM

The workplace is basically an adult sandbox. There are those that play together well, those who are aloof and of course there are bullies. These tips will help you manage them all.

Rescooped by David Hain from Supports for Leadership
Scoop.it!

Classic: What is success? Do You Have the Will to Lead and Answer the Toughest Questions? - Peter Koestenbaum

Classic:  What is success?  Do You Have the Will to Lead and Answer the Toughest Questions? - Peter Koestenbaum | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Philosopher Peter Koestenbaum poses the truly big questions: How do we act when risks seem overwhelming? What does it mean to be a successful human being?

___________________

   

How can we muster the guts to burn our bridges and to create a condition of no return?

___________________

       

{Have you asked yourself:]  How in the world did I get here? Or wrestled with ...strategic choices -- all of which seem hard and unpleasant -- and said, What happened to the fun part of being in business? According to Peter Koestenbaum, those uncomfortable questions -- those existential quandaries -- are at the root of issues that great leaders deal with all the time, and they influence every decision that must be made.
  
More than 25 years ago, Koestenbaum traded the cloistered halls of academia for the front lines of the global economy. It's not unheard-of for this philosopher, a tireless 71-year-old with thick glasses and a flowing beard, to visit clients across three continents in a single week. His agenda: to apply the power of philosophy to the big question of the day -- how to reconcile the often-brutal realities of business with basic human values -- and to create a new language of effective leadership. ...The more you understand the human condition, the more effective you are as a businessperson. Human depth makes business sense."

     

___________________

   

 

Change -- true, lasting, deep-seated change -- is the business world's biggest and most persistent challenge. 

___________________

   

Koestenbaum's wisdom makes sense to leaders at such giant organizations as Ford, EDS, Citibank, Xerox, Ericsson, and even one of Korea's chaebols. ... At Ford, Koestenbaum contributed to the company's 2,000-person Senior Executive Program throughout the 1980s. In more than a decade at EDS, he led seminars and coached hundreds of top executives, including then-chairman Les Alberthal. 

 

"Everything I do," says Koestenbaum, "is about using themes from the history of thought to rescue people who are stuck." His logic: Change -- true, lasting, deep-seated change -- is the business world's biggest and most persistent challenge. But too many people and too many companies approach change by treating it as a technical challenge rather than by developing authentic answers to basic questions about business life. 


WHY DOES BEING A LEADER FEEL SO HARD TODAY?

Because reckoning with freedom is always hard ...We're living in a peculiar time: It's marked by a soaring stock market, the creation of tremendous wealth, an explosion in innovation, and the acute alienation that occurs when the global economy hits the average individual. 

The message is, You're living in the best country in the world at the best time in history; you have an amazing degree of freedom to do what you want, along with an unprecedented opportunity to build immense wealth and success -- and to do it more quickly than ever before. Of course, the average individual has as much of a chance of launching a skyrocketing IPO as he or she has of becoming a movie star. 

       
________________________________
     
There's a terrible defect at the core of how we think about people and organizations today. ...There is little or no tolerance for the kinds of character-building conversations that pave the way for meaningful change.
________________________________

       

What's even more disturbing is that the ascendancy of shareholder value as the dominant driving force in business has resulted in a terrible insensitivity to basic human values. 

THAT'S A HEAVY BURDEN TO PLACE ON LEADERS. THEY MUST NOT ONLY GUIDE ORGANIZATIONS BUT ALSO WRESTLE WITH BASIC PHILOSOPHICAL QUESTIONS.

 

There's a terrible defect at the core of how we think about people and organizations today. There is little or no tolerance for the kinds of character-building conversations that pave the way for meaningful change. The average person is...riveted by the objective domain...where our metrics are; that's where we look for solutions. ...That's why books and magazines that have numbers in their titles sell so well.

 

We'll do anything to avoid facing the basic, underlying questions: How do we make truly difficult choices? How do we act when the risks seem overwhelming? How can we muster the guts to burn our bridges and to create a condition of no return?

     

___________________

   

...Managing polarity teaches us that there are no solutions -- there are only changes of attitude. 
___________________


There's nothing wrong with all of those technical solutions. They're excellent; they're creative; they're even necessary. But they shield us from the real issues: What kind of life do I want to lead? What is my destiny? How much evil am I willing to tolerate?

      

...Managing polarity teaches us that there are no solutions -- there are only changes of attitude. When you grapple with polarities in your life, you lose your arrogant, self-indulgent illusions, and you realize that the joke is on you. To get that message makes you a more credible human being -- instantly. 

===
As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full version of the Scooped post.

    

Related posts by Deb:

    

6 Steps Beyond Industrial Age Performance Appraisals    Choices for High Performance Teams, Groups and Psuedo-Teams: Achievement Is How You Say It!

         

Beyond Resilience: Givers, Takers, Matchers and Anti-Fragile Systems

    

Messing up a Change Implementation with Someone Else’s Learning Culture?

          

Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  9 multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

          

Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  

 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 19, 10:33 AM

I've recently learned that this classic article is the most downloaded article from Fast Company.  If you read it, you'll see why.  It asks the beautiful, and extraordinarily difficult questions about business and life. Changing perspective, and ultimately changing attitudes, is the big challenge in making lasting change fully sustainable.~  D

Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Uncommon Sense: What Public Policy Can Learn From the Private Sector About Motivation

Uncommon Sense: What Public Policy Can Learn From the Private Sector About Motivation | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

In the past few years, the use of "behavioral economics" has become highly popular as a public policy tool. Can the private sector help?

David Hain's insight:

5 principles in common between private and public sectors in large scale behaviour change.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Why Trust Don’t Come Easy

Why Trust Don’t Come Easy | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Nothing has changed. Richard Starkey recorded it 44 years ago. “I don’t ask for much, I only want your trust. And you know it don’t come easy.”

What makes trust so difficult to gain and retain?

David Hain's insight:

Trust is a very simple concept. And those who gain it are masters of one particular skill – managing expectations.  ~ Tom Asacker

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Hain from Leadership Lite
Scoop.it!

Eric Jacobson On Management And Leadership: 4 Ways To Make Your Executive Coaching Experience A Success

Eric Jacobson On Management And Leadership: 4 Ways To Make Your Executive Coaching Experience A Success | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

If you are a leader already engaging with an executive coach, or contemplating engaging one, here are four ways to make your coaching experience a success, as reported in a relatively recent issue of Fortune magazine.


Via Kevin Watson
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The Mirror Test - Why Self-Awareness Is the Secret Weapon for Habit Change

The Mirror Test - Why Self-Awareness Is the Secret Weapon for Habit Change | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

More than we’d probably like to admit so many of our days are spent in a state of self-delusion, an internal monologue of justifying our actions, both good and bad. When we do something wrong, our evolutionary instincts kick in and we do anything we can to not acknowledge the obvious: sometimes, it’s all our fault.

David Hain's insight:

Real habit change comes from taking a candid look at your shortcomings. Or, as Epictetus once said: Self-scrutiny applied with kindness - in other words. the mirror test!.

more...
Charlotte Hitchcock's curator insight, August 19, 2:37 AM

Know yourself before you  lead others. Understand why you respond as you do and  its affect on others.  Honesty about yourself can be hard but in the end it is worth it

Patricia D. Sadar - Career and Leadership Acceleration Coach's curator insight, August 26, 12:31 PM

If you want to go far...you need to know who you are!

 

 

David Jardin's curator insight, August 28, 4:06 AM

Emotional intelligence and effective leadership are unattainable without self-awareness.

Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

14 Leadership Lessons

14 Leadership Lessons | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Over the past two days, I had the opportunity to join over ~200,000 leaders in 350+ locations around the world who came together for one of the largest events of the year – the Global Leadership Summit. The speakers were gathered at the Willow Creek campus in Chicago, but only about 5% of the total viewing audience was present onsite – the majority of us were participating from countries all around the world.  The Summit is an annual event where you’ll find business leaders, church leaders, political leaders and social leaders from across all spans of life.

David Hain's insight:

Some nice #Leadership soundbytes here.  My favourite -“Your culture will only ever be as healthy as the most senior leader wants it to be.” ~ Bill Hybels

more...
Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, August 18, 1:16 AM

some nice quotes (and thoughts) there!

Suggested by AlGonzalezinfo
Scoop.it!

Teachers as Leaders, Coaches & Lifelong Mentors with Lydia Dolch

Teachers as Leaders, Coaches & Lifelong Mentors with Lydia Dolch | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Do you remember your 5th grade teachers?  Would you say that any of your 5th grade teachers made a lifelong impression on your life?
Today’s guest is doing just that! Lydia Dolch, a teacher and consultant in Ithaca NY joined me to discuss a #FutureLead...
David Hain's insight:

Important topic worth listening to.  @BulliesOut!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Hain from Supports for Leadership
Scoop.it!

Leading from the Shadows

Leading from the Shadows | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
When is coming in second better than first? Richard Hytner explains why the No. 1 position may not be ideal and how No. 2 often is the key to success.

Via Anne Leong, Tessie Uranga-MSEd., Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
more...
Graeme Reid's curator insight, August 14, 5:08 PM

You can be enormously successful, on your own terms, leading from positions other than the overall No. 1.