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The Top 100 Thought Leaders in Trustworthy Business Behavior™

The Top 100 Thought Leaders in Trustworthy Business Behavior™ | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The Top Thought Leaders in Trustworthy Business Behavior™ (Trust Across America names 2014 Top Thought Leaders in Trustworthy Business.
David Hain's insight:
Congratulations - a great accolade to be in the 100 most trusted!
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Coaching Leaders
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Five Practices of Transformational Leaders - Forbes

Five Practices of Transformational Leaders - Forbes | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
In my executive coaching work with high potential leaders, I get to learn first hand what truly makes a difference between the leaders who meet the goals they set for our coaching work, and those who miss out on the opportunity.

On the surface these leaders have a lot in common. They are all senior leaders in Fortune 500 companies. They are smart, ambitious, and committed to their careers. Their companies want to invest in their growth. The coaching process we work through is similar.

Yet, across hundreds of coaching hours with these leaders I’ve observed five practices that truly make a difference in whether leaders meet their goals or not. Those who do transform themselves, progress rapidly in careers, and transform the organizations they work within (one of them is on Fortune’s 50 Most Powerful Women list). The key variable that makes a difference is not me (the executive coach) at all. It’s the person being coached and what they practice.

So, whether you are going through an executive coaching process or not, you can use these five practices to more predictably meet the goals you’re setting for yourself.

Here are the five biggest differentiators:
David Hain's insight:

Choose 'be' before 'do'. Good advice for leaders.

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6 effective leadership styles we can learn from 'Game of Thrones'

6 effective leadership styles we can learn from 'Game of Thrones' | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
In the real world, leaders come in many forms. The same is true in HBO's "Game of Thrones." Every major player has had their own style of doing things, from the Usurper to the Young Wolf to the Blackfish to the Queen of Thorns. 

However, in his book Primal Leadership, David Goleman (along with co-authors Richard Boyatzis and Annie McKee) argues that people tend to fit into one of six key leadership styles. 

These are the "Game of Thrones" characters that best exemplify the best — and worst — of each style. Read through and consider what category you'd fit into if you were vying for power in Westeros and Essos. 

Warning: "Game of Thrones" spoilers ahead. 
David Hain's insight:

The Game of Thrones and Goleman's leadership styles...

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The Lost Art of Thinking in Large Organizations

The Lost Art of Thinking in Large Organizations | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
If you ask managers in a large organization to approach a strategic business problem, their focus often quickly narrows to proposing solutions. When asked why, many respond that they don’t have time to think.

How did we arrive in a state where managers do not recognize that thinking is part of their job? The answer reflects a relentless focus on execution in many large companies. A company becomes big by finding a successful business model — and then scaling it massively. This necessitates building a finely tuned system with highly standardized processes. To get promoted in such an environment requires an almost singular focus on execution. In other words, it requires action more than thinking. However, once executives are promoted to a senior level, these new business leaders must be able to think strategically. Ironically, the very skills in execution that led to their promotions often make these executives ill-equipped for their new roles, since their strategy thinking muscles have withered from disuse.
David Hain's insight:

Is a bias for action causing a deficit of broader thinking in your organisation? I see it all the time in my coaching work.

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Want to Vastly Improve Employee Morale? Try This Leadership Style

Want to Vastly Improve Employee Morale? Try This Leadership Style | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Eleven years ago, I reported to a highly emotionally-intelligent and very successful executive -- still my favorite boss to this day.

The greatest lessons Bruce taught me were about how to best serve employees. Not your cup of tea? Well, this was his competitive edge -- Servant-Leadership -- and it's backed by science because it works.

So that became our calling when I founded this company. I even scripted our company video around Bruce's Servant-Leadership style. In it, I tell viewers that he "connected with us on an emotional level -- he engaged us." 

But that two-and-a-half minute clip doesn't do Bruce justice.

In short, Bruce did what the best of Servant-Leaders with high emotional intelligence do: He invested in my development, looking after my needs so that I was equipped to succeed and do great work for my clients.

Simon Sinek, author of the best-seller Leaders Eat Last knows about the positive psychology behind Servant-Leadership. He is quoted in this excellent clip as saying,

"There's not a CEO on the planet who is responsible for the customer. You're responsible for the people who are responsible for the customer."

And that describes my former boss to a tee. Bruce knew that to serve our clients well, he had to serve me well first.

For the rest of this article, I will spell out ten traits that made Bruce stand head-and-shoulders above any other executive leader I've known or worked for.
David Hain's insight:

Brief, persuasive and personal 101 on servant leadership!

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Bosses vs. Leaders: Companies Need Neither

Bosses vs. Leaders: Companies Need Neither | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
It was just a couple of hours ago that I saw an illustration here on my news stream on LinkedIn, about the differences between "the boss" and "the leader". Most of us have probably seen this kind of visual many times before: They invariably argue for "bosses becoming more like leaders", for "leaders becoming more transformational", or for companies to not have bosses altogether. Now, let´s look at this line of thinking a little bit closer.
David Hain's insight:

Coruscating (and sensible) look at the Boss vs Leader dilemma from Nils Pflaeging. Required reading for consideration!

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Meetings Matter 

Meetings Matter  | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
David Hain's insight:

How many meetings were you in this week? How many were maximised? Some tips here on how to get more from meetings!

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What Obama’s last year in office teaches us about resilience

What Obama’s last year in office teaches us about resilience | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Obama’s shortcomings as president inevitably get the most news coverage. We’re in a business, after all, that will never post the headline “Plane lands safely.” But in this period of national difficulty, it’s good to remember not just Obama’s setbacks but also the side of him that demonstrates what resilience looks like. These moments remind us of America’s exceptional character, even in its current, ugly paralysis.
David Hain's insight:

On the day after we lost one of our brightest and best MPs to assassination, a note on Obama's role in stiffening resilience!

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Ian Berry's curator insight, June 17, 4:50 PM
From afar it seems to me that the broken political system means less of a legacy from Mr Obama than everyone hoped for. I expect he will do far more good for the world after he leaves office
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Anger, Battling Our Deadliest Disease

Anger, Battling Our Deadliest Disease | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
I propose hate and the inability to muster enough self control of our emotions is reaching epidemic proportions in our country and it is literally killing us.  Not only is hate deadly for victims who are on the receiving end, it is dangerous for the hater and needs to be eradicated long before it results in  senseless tragedy.

Anger seems to be all around us.  I see it every day and have noticed it more and more as the years go by.  People seem to be operating at a baseline of angry every day.  They drive angry, they cross the street angry, they are angry on television, the internet, in line at the grocery store.  Our leaders are angry and it seems to spread like a virulent strain with no remedy in sight.  Gone are the days when you disagreed with a political or religious ideology but could maintain respect for, and even work side by side with the individual that held it dear, for the purpose of a greater good.  Hating or even killing someone simply because they believed something in opposition to what you believe was not as common an occurrence as it seems to be now.  Even justified anger has negative physical and emotional effects.  Our blood pressure and heart rate accelerate, cortisol levels rise and we are less able to make rational decisions.  Our relationships can suffer, even our jobs can be in jeopardy if we can’t manage our anger.  Here are some thing you can do to minimize anger:
David Hain's insight:

What do we do with our anger? It's a channel, but has the potential to be self-defeating...

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Holacracy: a red herring in the quest for leadership

Holacracy: a red herring in the quest for leadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

The problem with Holacracy is that focusing on a management system draws attention away from developing a mindset. Holacracy feeds into the misconception that by getting the ‘right’ management structure and system employees will tap into entrepreneurial leadership that’s stifled by traditional hierarchy. 


Now I’m not suggesting that traditional hierarchies are a hotbed of personal leadership. And, yes if you want entrepreneurialism and employees taking the lead it might seem a good idea to create a system that doesn’t privilege managers and status. 

But leadership isn’t a system or a process. You can’t systemise leadership – it’s a mindset. And designing a system, process or methodology doesn’t give rise to leadership in employees. It kills it.   

David Hain's insight:

The Holacracy Paradox - makes a lot of sense to me!

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Common Misconceptions Harm Executive Coaching - Chief Learning Officer - CLO Media

Common Misconceptions Harm Executive Coaching - Chief Learning Officer - CLO Media | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Despite the growing popularity of executive coaching, its effectiveness has been hindered by common misconceptions, said Gary Cohen, president of CO2 Partners, a Minnesota-based leadership development firm.

“Some mistaken perceptions abound on what coaching is supposed to do, or can do,” Cohen said. “There’s a naive idea that the coach is going to provide a road map for success, and there’s also the persistent psychotherapy model.

“No wonder so many coaching engagements fail to live up to expectation when the goal is so often misunderstood.”

Because managers increasingly are offered coaching as part of their leadership development, it is crucial that people have a better grasp of the discipline, Cohen said.

He cited 10 of the most frequent misconceptions:
David Hain's insight:

Clarify your coaching expectations in order to make sure you benefit!

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The Executive Roadmap to Self-Reflection

The Executive Roadmap to Self-Reflection | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
As stated by Talmud, “We do not see things as they are; but as we are.” This doctrine from the eighth century speaks to our perceptions and questions our ability to understand people and situations accurately.

In a competitive and fluid corporate environment, executives make decisions based on their experiences and ability to navigate complex change situations. But many leaders fail to look through the lens of the opposing viewpoints and limit their decision quality by projecting only their own thoughts, insights and experiences into a situation without acknowledging alternative angles or beliefs. Strategic self-reflection can enable leaders to create a bridge between information and wisdom.
David Hain's insight:

How well do you know your blind spots? Probably directly related to the quality of the feedback you elicit...

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Knowledge Bank –

Knowledge Bank – | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Most of any leader’s annoying habits and interpersonal flaws are rooted in information compulsion.

Sharing and withholding are two sides of the same tarnished coin. For example, when you insist on adding more value, passing judgment, making destructive comments, announcing that you already know, or explaining why something won’t work, you are compulsively sharing information convinced that you are making people smarter or inspiring them to do better, when you are more likely having the opposite effect. When you fail to give recognition, or claim credit you don’t deserve, or refuse to apologize, or don’t express your gratitude, you are withholding information.

Other annoying habits are rooted in a different compulsion-one that is centered on emotion. When you get angry, play favorites, or punish the messenger, you are succumbing to emotion-and displaying it for all to see.

You either share information and emotion, or withhold them. If s good to share information that helps people and good to withhold information when it harms people (many secrets should be kept). The same goes for emotion: it’s worth sharing sometimes, and other times, not worth it at all.
David Hain's insight:

Challenging self-delusion and other nuggets of coaching wisdom from Marshall Goldsmith!

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10 Research-Proven Tricks To Seem Smarter Than You Are

10 Research-Proven Tricks To Seem Smarter Than You Are | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Intelligence (IQ) is fixed at an early age. You might not be able to change your IQ, but you can definitely alter the way people perceive you. When it comes to succeeding in the real world, perception is half the battle.
David Hain's insight:

Some simple and intriguing hacks to change people's perceptions of you!

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America's Shadow: The Real Secret of Donald J. Trump

America's Shadow: The Real Secret of Donald J. Trump | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
There's a powerful way to explain the rise of Donald Trump that most commentators have missed entirely or undervalued. The standard line describes Trump as a bizarre anomaly. Beginning as an improbable celebrity candidate, he has defied all the conventional rules of politics, which should have been fatal. Instead Trump has swept all before him on the Republican side. Possessing a "genius" for grabbing the limelight, he continues to dominate the scene in ways no previous politician ever has in modern times--so the conventional view goes.

 

But in reality Trump isn't bizarre or anomalous. He stands for something universal, something right before our eyes. It's an aspect of the human psyche that we feel embarrassed and ashamed of, which makes it our collective secret.  Going back a century in the field of depth psychology, the secret side of human nature acquired a special name: the shadow.

 

The shadow compounds all the dark impulses--hatred, aggression, sadism, selfishness, jealousy, resentment, sexual transgression--that are hidden out of sight. The name originated with Carl Jung, but its basic origin came from Freud's insight that our psyches are dualistic, sharply divided between the conscious and unconscious. The rise of civilization is a tribute to how well we obey our conscious mind and suppress our unconscious side. But what hides in the shadows will out.
David Hain's insight:

Timely warning from Deepak Chopra about how we need to beware the shadow side of being human, and where it manifests!

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The six signature traits of inclusive leadership: Thriving in a diverse new world

The six signature traits of inclusive leadership: Thriving in a diverse new world | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
“ Diversity of markets, customers, ideas, and talent is driving the need for inclusion as a new leadership capability. Here are six attributes of leaders who display the ability to not only embrace individual differences, but to potentially leverage them for competitive advantage.”
Via Marc Wachtfogel, PhD, Roger Francis, Dean J. Fusto
David Hain's insight:
How to be inclusive, huge leadership success factor!
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Great Teams Build Great Cultures

Great Teams Build Great Cultures | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
“ People committed to common purposes and goals can change key elements of a company’s culture when they set strong ground rules that allow people to feel confident.”
Via Marc Wachtfogel, PhD, Roger Francis
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Dr. Victor Rosa's curator insight, June 11, 8:59 PM
Team building is the key! 
Adele Taylor's curator insight, June 13, 5:44 PM
Having a safe space for people (within a team) to share ideas without repercussions, sounds simple really... 
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The Importance of Opportunity

The Importance of Opportunity | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
People and organizations grow and develop to the extent that they capitalize on opportunities to do so. Opportunities are important to leaders because they’re important to the people they lead. Opportunities are the venues where people can try, test, better, and even find themselves. 

The leader’s job is to match the opportunity to the person and to help the person—and the organization—exploit that opportunity for all it’s worth. Open-door leadership is about noticing, identifying, and creating opportunities for those being led. 
David Hain's insight:

Why opportunity issue important to the growth mindset - one minute, one big insight!

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donhornsby's curator insight, June 10, 9:43 AM
(From the article): People and organizations grow and develop to the extent that they capitalize on opportunities to do so. Opportunities are important to leaders because they’re important to the people they lead. Opportunities are the venues where people can try, test, better, and even find themselves. The leader’s job is to match the opportunity to the person and to help the person—and the organization—exploit that opportunity for all it’s worth. Open-door leadership is about noticing, identifying, and creating opportunities for those being led.
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The Magic and Logic of Powerful Public Speaking: TED Curator Chris Anderson’s Field Guide to Giving a Great Talk

The Magic and Logic of Powerful Public Speaking: TED Curator Chris Anderson’s Field Guide to Giving a Great Talk | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
“Words are events, they do things, change things,” Ursula K. Le Guin wrote in her sublime reflection on telling and listening. “They transform both speaker and hearer; they feed energy back and forth and amplify it. They feed understanding or emotion back and forth and amplify it.” This mutual transformation takes place in a special atmosphere that exists in no other realm of life — one Paul Goodman captured beautifully in his taxonomy of the nine kinds of silence, among which he listed “the silence of listening to another speak, catching the drift and helping him be clear.”

The architecture of that singular atmosphere is what TED curator Chris Anderson explores in TED Talks: The Official TED Guide to Public Speaking (public library) — a contemporary counterpart to George Plimptom’s advice on public speaking, drawing on Anderson’s experience in hosting some of the most electrifying, inspiring, and mobilizing idea-packets of our time, delivered from the TED stage to more than a billion people around the world who hunger for intellectual, creative, and spiritual nourishment.
David Hain's insight:

To make a story telling impact, focus on giving to the audience!

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Why Every CEO Needs a Coach

Why Every CEO Needs a Coach | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Every Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is "on the stage" the majority of his or her work life but needs pre-performance quiet and confidential time to be creative, bounce their ideas off someone in a safe environment, and explore the unintended consequences of their future actions.  Engaging in a personal coaching conversation is a refreshing opportunity where the CEO can be completely open and creative in a confidential and safe place.

When asked what was the best advice he ever received, Eric Schmidt, Chairman and CEO of Google, recognized it was from John Doerr, who in 2001 said, "My advice to you is to have a coach."  Schmidt initially resented the advice, because after all, he was a CEO.  He was pretty experienced.  Why would he need a coach? 
David Hain's insight:

If it works for Eric Schmidt...! Why you should think about hiring coach.

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donhornsby's curator insight, June 9, 10:46 AM
(From the article): I often hear myself telling my coach that it’s painful sometimes to have to be brutally honest with myself and as he always explains, it’s best to be honest with your coach as they are a sound board for you. Let’s think about this concept for a moment. If I didn’t have a coach then this conversation would be going on internally, with my inner self talk. As we all know inner self talk goes round and round and doesn’t actually go anywhere except in a negative energy field. It spirals down into a conversation of justifying and explaining why I shouldn’t do something. Controlling our inner self talk takes great skill.
Ian Berry's curator insight, June 10, 8:45 PM
Lot of wisdom in this article. For me it describes mentoring more than coaching. I know some great business coaches and respect their work. I also know that the term is somewhat tainted because of the zillions of people putting up a shingle. I prefer being regarded as a mentor which is how my clients see me
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Mutiny on the ice: Earnest Shackleton and the trust equation

Mutiny on the ice: Earnest Shackleton and the trust equation | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
How is it that Shackleton managed to provide the leadership to overcome mutiny and save all of his men despite the desperate nature of their predicament? 

What can we take from it that would be useful in business today?  I believe it came down to trust - the trust that Shackleton’s men had built in him, and the environment of trust that he created in his team.

There is a Trust Equation defined in the book The Trusted Advisor that shows the elements needed for trust to exist. 

It’s this: Trust = (Credibility x Reliability x Intimacy)/Self Orientation
David Hain's insight:

Meet the Trust Equation! How well does yours add up?

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A Surprisingly Easy Way To Control Your Anger

A Surprisingly Easy Way To Control Your Anger | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
DO YOU PUNCH A BAG TO CONTROL ANGER?

Does venting off your anger douse your flame? Does blowing off your steam make you calmer? Does carrying out an aggressive action control your anger?

Did anyone ever suggest that you pedal the hell out of your exercise bike or box the stuffing out of a punching bag to get your anger under control?

It’s a popular belief that punching a bag or a wall or a pillow reduces your anger. But experts say that the popular media may have got it all wrong. 
A 1999 study by Brad Bushman, Angela Stack, and Roy Baumeister found that people who followed the media circulated catharsis message that aggressive actions relax and reduce anger, and then hit the punching bag, were afterwards more aggressive.

And a 2002 study by the same anger researcher Brad Bushman found that when angry participants hit a punching bag while thinking about the person who had angered them, they got angrier.
David Hain's insight:

Anger management issues? Get an exercise bike in the office!

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Five Moments When Saying No Is Your Best Strategy

Five Moments When Saying No Is Your Best Strategy | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Most successful leaders have little difficulty saying no to a losing deal, to a project that’s wasting money, or to a request that doesn’t align with their priorities. But these same leaders can find it very uncomfortable to speak up when their concerns are less cut-and-dried or when their organization is hell-bent on pursuing a plan. In certain situations, it can feel politically risky to hesitate or ask too many questions. Even with their direct reports, many leaders find themselves putting off the difficult conversations needed to address issues such as drifting standards, inappropriate behavior, or emerging bad habits.

But, as difficult as it can be, saying no is often the key to effective leadership. Without the ability to push back when needed, you run the risk of “commitment drift”: promises made to customers or employees, or to promote safety, specific values, financial discipline, or social and environmental responsibility are eroded incrementally, without anyone really stopping to think about the consequences. As Joseph Fuller and Michael C. Jensen pointed out in their 2002 paper “Just Say No to Wall Street: Putting a Stop to the Earnings Game,” saying no to such dysfunctional momentum can be your best strategy for helping your company succeed as well as living your values.
David Hain's insight:

If your gut says no, it probably should prompt you to say no - or at least explore your concerns openly!

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donhornsby's curator insight, June 8, 10:49 AM
(From the article): Being prepared to recognize and act on these moments of truth makes it less likely that you will blow by critical decision points without giving them the attention they deserve. The fact is, it only gets harder to speak up if you wait. And, as you practice saying no or raising questions constructively, you increase your ability to exert a positive influence on your organization.
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5 Ways to Engage Your Management Team to Lead (And Not Just Manage)

5 Ways to Engage Your Management Team to Lead (And Not Just Manage) | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The top 5 leadership lessons to coach your management tea
Via Skip Boykin
David Hain's insight:

Leaders growing leaders...

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Why the Best Leaders Are Social Media Savvy

Why the Best Leaders Are Social Media Savvy | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The C-suite is more effective and trustworthy when engaged on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram, according to new research. These tools can help you overcome a reputation crisis.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, David Hain
David Hain's insight:

Why SoMe leaders have a leg up on others?

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David Hain's curator insight, June 8, 2:39 AM

SoMe leaders get it! How about you?

donhornsby's curator insight, June 8, 10:42 AM
Share your insight
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The remarkable quote that captures how Muhammad Ali defined leadership

The remarkable quote that captures how Muhammad Ali defined leadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Muhammad Ali would have settled to be remembered as a leader. Yes, settled.

In a quote repeated in remembrance after fond remembrance since the boxer and 20th-century icon's death Friday at age 74, Ali shared how he hoped his legacy would endure. In his memoir, "The Soul of a Butterfly: Reflections on Life’s Journey," written with his daughter Hana Yasmeen Ali, he wrote:

"I would like to be remembered as a man who won the heavyweight title three times, who was humorous, and who treated everyone right. As a man who never looked down on those who looked up to him, and who helped as many people as he could. As a man who stood up for his beliefs no matter what. As a man who tried to unite all humankind through faith and love. And if all that’s too much, then I guess I’d settle for being remembered only as a great boxer who became a leader and champion of his people. And I wouldn’t even mind if folks forgot how pretty I was."

If all that's too much. I guess I'd settle for being remembered only as a great boxer who became a leader.

Let those words sink in for a moment. Because they capture the epic scale of Ali's ambition, the principles that guided his transcendent life, the way he defined and characterized the champion that he was.
David Hain's insight:

Ali - RIP! Articulate about leadership, as he was about everything he did!

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Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.