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Ken Blanchard - It's Always the Leader | The Leadership Hub

Ken Blanchard - It's Always the Leader | The Leadership Hub | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Wonderful animation from One Minute Manager author and all-round leadership guru and brilliant teacher, Ken Blanchard.
David Hain's insight:

Definitely worth 3 minutes of your time....

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Jerry Busone's curator insight, January 24, 2014 7:45 AM

Love the quote" Leadership is about cross training your people moment to moment based on their need."..BASED ON THEIR NEED... get it

Coaching Leaders
Helping leaders to develop themselves and others
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To Win the Civil War, Lincoln Had to Change His Leadership

To Win the Civil War, Lincoln Had to Change His Leadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
In our work with leaders, we see that great ones grow themselves and their organizations by deliberately working on three areas:

They wisely manage the present, anchoring in purpose and values.
They selectively forget the past, letting go of old values, beliefs, and behaviors that no longer serve them or their organizations.
They purposefully create the future by adopting new aspirations, values, beliefs, and behaviors that enable a step-change in their leadership.
Most leaders are good at the first and third areas. What many leaders may not recognize is that we often need to give something up — a belief, attitude or behavior — in order to achieve a new level of performance. How is this done effectively?
David Hain's insight:

Past, present and future leadership - what wins you battles doesn't always win you wars! The Abe Lincoln story.

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The Life-Changing Power of Small Things

The Life-Changing Power of Small Things | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
There is a deep-seated principle that governs much of human interaction – the principle of reciprocity. All the energy and commitment that you dedicate to the success of others, therefore comes back to you as those others in turn become committed to your success. Simply put, the best leaders don’t climb their way to the top over the backs of others, they are carried to the top. While this may not seem to be the quickest path to success, it is a guaranteed success strategy. And it works exponentially. As you develop this habit, your reputation will soar over time, which will lead in turn to the best internal and external opportunities flowing your way.
David Hain's insight:

Sky Cycling team thrived on the theory of marginal gains. Here's a good article on how to apply it to your life!

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3 Tips on Coaching Managers to Be Better Coaches ‹ http://coachfederation.org/blog

3 Tips on Coaching Managers to Be Better Coaches ‹ http://coachfederation.org/blog | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Teams led by managers who focus on strengths report engagement levels of 61 percent, while teams led by managers who focus on weaknesses report engagement levels of just 45 percent. That makes sense, but here’s the kicker: When managers ignore their employees, engagement plummets to a mere two percent.

One of the most important, leadership skills to develop in managers is the ability to coach effectively—including how to connect with employees and get the best out of them on an ongoing basis. From my own experience, here are three employee performance management best practices I’ve found effective in turning frontline managers into first-rate coaches.

David Hain's insight:

Coaching matters - the numbers prove it!

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Dismantling The Myth Of The Self-Reliant CEO

Dismantling The Myth Of The Self-Reliant CEO | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Mark Zuckerberg. Steve Jobs. Elon Musk. Tony Stark. Only one of those four is fictional, but all share in a popular mythology that the most successful CEOs are independent visionaries who create value through sheer inspiration and force of will.

As companies grow, so does the need for external support.
That idea has deep roots in the American ideal of rugged individualism. And for startup founders, it means the weight of their companies' success or failure ultimately falls on them. This is a heavy burden for first-time founders especially, but it obscures a truth that applies to many more: Leading a successful company often requires an enormous amount of support, and not just from employees within their own organizations.

At any rate, that was my suspicion based on my own experience as a startup founder. So I put it to the test (albeit unscientifically) by surveying 56 venture-backed startup CEOs on how they get the personal and professional support they need to keep their companies moving forward. This anonymous survey targeted three groups:

Seed-stage CEOs, whose companies have raised less than $5 million in outside capital
Early-stage CEOs, whose companies have raised $5–25 million
Growth-stage CEOs, whose companies have raised more than $25 million
What I uncovered was a dramatic departure from the image of the hero CEO. From executive coaches to support groups and personal therapists, CEOs rely on a surprising range of people to help them succeed. It truly takes a village.
David Hain's insight:

It takes a village to raise an entrepreneur! Fascinating survey of the self-made!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 28, 10:27 AM

Thanks to David Hain for sharing this.  What do you think?

Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, May 29, 2:28 AM
Nos, egy startup CEO-kat vizsgáló kutatás (Amerikában) azt mutatta ki, hogy közel 40%-a az összesnek fordult vezetői/executive coachhoz támogatásért és a növekedési fázisban lévő cégek CEO-i esetében ez 60%-ra ugrott...
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Kristin Neff: The Three Components of Self-Compassion

The world's leading researcher of self-compassion and founder of the Mindful Self-Compassion program explains the core features of self-compassion.
David Hain's insight:

Look after yourself! It's dangerous in these heads of ours...

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6 ways watching the English Premier League makes you a better leader

6 ways watching the English Premier League makes you a better leader | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Amidst all the drama, goals, and penalty shouts, if you’ve been paying attention, this remarkable season in the English Premier League just might have made you a better leader.

As a Global Leadership Fellow with the World Economic Forum*, I learn a lot about leadership in all facets of life. For me, like millions of others, this includes my weekly fix of the English Premier League. Here are six ways this season has taught us to be better leaders – whether of sporting teams, in workplaces, or even within our families.
David Hain's insight:

Some really good leadership insights form the Saturday afternoon fix!

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How should we respond to global corruption?

How should we respond to global corruption? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Following last week’s Anti-Corruption Summit in London and the numerous major scandals that preceded it, corruption is the dirty word on everybody’s lips. Leaders around the world are finally starting to engage in a more honest dialogue about how we all are enabling corruption, whether it is governments that turn a blind eye to corrupt funds flowing through their financial systems, corporations that prioritize short-term profits regardless of the long-term cost, or international organizations that need to better scrutinize what happens to their development funds.

We have a small window of opportunity to turn talk into action. Our failure to respond appropriately to the many serious issues that have come to light would lead to an insurmountable deficit of public trust.
David Hain's insight:

Will the focus on corruption last? Let's hope so!

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Listening Is an Overlooked Leadership Tool

Listening Is an Overlooked Leadership Tool | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
“What do you think?”

I ask this question a lot. My team knows that when they come to me with a question, this is likely the question I’ll come back with first. Sometimes I even preface it with, “I don’t know.” As leaders in our organizations, it’s up to us to coach colleagues and our employees through finding that answer. More often than not, when I ask this question, my team has a better answer than I do — or one that I hadn’t thought about before.

It can be a powerful technique, especially if there is no single right answer – a situation that will be familiar to anyone doing leading-edge work. But it only works in an organization that values listening.
David Hain's insight:

Listening matters - here's the why and some hows!

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donhornsby's curator insight, May 27, 8:51 AM
So how can we listen more? 

Three suggestions to try this week: 

 Look people in the eye. Sherry Turkle, a professor at MIT who studies the psychology of online connectivity, wisely wrote in her recent book Reclaiming Conversation, “We face a significant choice. It is not about giving up our phones but about using them with greater intention. Conversation is there for us to reclaim.” Put down your phone when you’re in meetings. Close your laptop. See if you’re more energized about work and the people with whom you work. 

 Create space in your day. Manage your calendar and stop booking yourself out the entire day. Can someone on your team be part of that meeting? Does it need to be an hour, or can 30 minutes suffice? Give yourself time for reflection and space throughout the day, so that when you are talking with someone, you can give them your full attention. 

 Ask more questions. Next time a colleague or employee asks for advice, make sure you’re listening and understand the situation. Then, before answering, ask a question. Clarify what they really need — usually it’s just validation that their thinking is on the right track.
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 28, 10:27 AM

Totally agree.

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How to Choose a Mentor

How to Choose a Mentor | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The benefits of having a mentor are big. A survey of Fortune 500 companies found that 96% of executives credited mentoring as an important development tool and 75% said mentoring played a key role in their career success.

But how do you get a mentor?

Many employees and managers complain about not having a mentor. Such people are usually waiting for the company to assign a mentor to them. Mentoring works much better when the mentee takes responsibility for choosing a mentor.

So, the first place to start is to find one yourself! Below are some characteristics of great mentors:
David Hain's insight:

Everyone needs a mentor! I certainly do. How to find the right one for you...

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donhornsby's curator insight, May 25, 9:05 AM
(From the article): The aim of mentoring is to build the capability of you, the mentee. As such, you should always choose a mentor who you feel can respond to your needs in a way that enables you to find your own solutions to problems that you may be dealing with. Ultimately, your mentor should help build you up to eventually have a mentee of your own!
Raynak Search's curator insight, May 25, 11:29 AM
Great advice for all of you on your way to the C-Suite and beyond
Rey Carr's curator insight, May 26, 4:58 PM
A comprehensive list of Find-a-Mentor services, if you need help, at http://www.mentors.ca/findamentor.html
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12 Neglected Questions Successful Leaders Keep Asking

12 Neglected Questions Successful Leaders Keep Asking | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Wrong questions turn people’s attention to distracting issues. You hinder progress when you distract your team.

Distractions cause damage.
David Hain's insight:

5 minutes. 12 questions. A lifetime of exploration! Great coaching input from @Leadershipfreak!

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donhornsby's curator insight, May 26, 9:53 AM
Wrong questions turn people’s attention to distracting issues. You hinder progress when you distract your team.
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The Career Limitations Of Emotional Intelligence

The Career Limitations Of Emotional Intelligence | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Surely by now you’ve heard: Highly emotionally intelligent people are more successful, and companies are bending over backward to recruit them.

The term "emotional intelligence" (often abbreviated to EQ or EI) was first coined by the psychologist and former New York Times journalist Daniel Goleman in 1995, and while it’s had its critics, the term’s buzzword status hasn’t relented much since. That’s partly because the skills and attributes it describes are indeed in hot demand by employers.

But for job seekers, there’s also reason to be cautious about prioritizing emotional intelligence at the expense of all else.
David Hain's insight:

High EQ is worth having - but it's not the only thing worth having!

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From the Outside In

From the Outside In | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

In September 2015, Ralph Lauren, founder and chief executive officer of the fashion empire that bears his name, made news by announcing he would step down from his post as CEO. His decision to hand off the reins of his company wasn’t surprising — Lauren was about to turn 76, and the company’s financial performance had been slipping. Rather, the announcement was noteworthy because Lauren is known for favoring continuity in his clothing design and in management. During his nearly 50 years at the company, he had made it a practice to promote from within. And yet Lauren’s handpicked successor would be a newcomer to the firm, Swedish retail executive Stefan Larsson. Larsson had not lived and breathed Polo. And his prior experience was at discount-oriented retailing brands. But he was nonetheless a rising star in the business of fashion. Larsson’s accomplishments include driving successful international expansion over a 15-year career at H&M, and engineering an impressive turnaround of Gap’s Old Navy division, of which he was named president in 2012.

This episode is indicative of a broader trend evident in the high-stakes arena of CEO succession. Hiring an executive from outside a company to serve as chief executive officer has historically been a last resort — a move companies typically made only when a board of directors needed to force out the incumbent CEO suddenly, or had failed to groom a suitable successor, or both. Sometimes companies would interview outsiders as they were planning to make a change. But often those interviews were simply pro forma, and the board would revert to an insider as the final choice. That’s changing. Over the last several years, we have seen more companies deliberately choosing an outsider CEO. And when they do, more often than not, it is part of a planned succession.

David Hain's insight:

Article on CEO succession strategy includes interactive quiz on whether you have what it takes to be a CEO.

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Reclaim Your Job

Reclaim Your Job | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Truly effective managers don’t operate in the context of individual tasks or jobs but in the much broader context of their organizations and careers. That approach sounds simple enough, but it is sometimes hard to act on because some organizational cultures that tout “empowerment” actually discourage volition among their managers. Young, high-tech companies, for example, sometimes hold their managers hostage to frenzy, thus inhibiting the reflective and persistent pursuit of long-term goals. Other cultures—particularly those of old and established corporations with command-and-control hierarchies—can encourage people to go along with the status quo, regardless of the level of organizational dysfunction. In both kinds of environments, managers tend to fall into a reactive state of mind, assuming that any initiative they show will be either ignored or discouraged.

In most cases, however, it is not the environment that inhibits managers from taking purposeful action. Rather, it is managers themselves. We have found that managers can learn to act on their own potential and make a difference. Here’s how.

David Hain's insight:

Some thoughts from HBR on how to take hold of your agenda - 12 years old and needed more than ever!

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The Authenticity Factor | The Purposeful Culture Group

The Authenticity Factor | The Purposeful Culture Group | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Our great bosses kept their commitments, delivering on their promises. If they were unable to keep their commitments, they told us why, well in advance of the deadline. They also explained how they were trying to get back on track, as soon as possible.

Unfortunately, leaders that demonstrate authentic care are not the norm. For example, TinyHR’s 2014 engagement and culture survey found that 49% of employees are not satisfied with their direct supervisor.
David Hain's insight:

If doing what you say is so important and basic (see last scoop), why do so many appear to fail to understand?

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Trust Requires Fewer Promises & More Delivery

Trust Requires Fewer Promises & More Delivery | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Reliability, dependability, integrity -- these are the essential building blocks of trust. Sounds simple, yet they are so difficult to achieve day in, day out. 

Under-promising and over-delivery is the ticket, of course.
David Hain's insight:

Trust is critical in the relationship economy. Doing what you say is critical in building trust! Hubris is your enemy, don't do it!

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How to Find Your Power—and Avoid Abusing It

How to Find Your Power—and Avoid Abusing It | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

For the past twenty years, I have been carrying out experiments to find out how power is distributed in groups. I have infiltrated college dorms and children’s summer camps to document who rises in power. I have brought entire sororities and fraternities into the lab, capturing the substance and spread of individuals’ reputations within their social networks. I have surreptitiously identified which members of groups are gossiped about, and who receive gossip. To chart the experience of power, I have studied what it feels like to be placed in positions of authority.

Findings from this research converge on an organizing idea: Whereas the Machiavellian approach to power assumes that individuals grab it through coercive force, strategic deception, and the undermining of others, the science finds that power is not grabbed but is given to individuals by groups.
What this means is that your ability to make a difference in the world—your power, as I define it—is shaped by what other people think of you. Your capacity to alter the state of others depends on their trust in you. Your ability to empower others depends on their willingness to be influenced by you. Your power is constructed in the judgments and actions of others. When they grant you power, they increase your ability to make their lives better—or worse.

David Hain's insight:

Givers always gain, and it seems from exhaustive research that power may be one of the things they gain from giving!

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 23, 10:43 AM
Leading is about listening and stepping aside when it is necessary. When we experience leadership as an assigned role, that is when problems arise and abuse of power occurs. What do we see in schools?
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How Your Leadership Has to Change as Your Startup Scales

How Your Leadership Has to Change as Your Startup Scales | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

To scale the business successfully, entrepreneurs need  their employees onboard. To get there, they need to focus on  motivational drivers and shift  mindset from “startup” to “scale up.” The latter requires balancing the “push” mode of leadership (tell, direct, delegate) with a “pull” approach (empower, collaborate, coach), which has been shown to generate greater commitment and creativity in staff members no matter their age or the size of the company.

Here are four things leaders and their organizations can do to move from startup mode to scale-up mode:

David Hain's insight:

There are some key scale thresholds that imply leadership style shifts as business grow. Miss them at your peril!

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The Buddha’s concept of leadership - The Nation

The Buddha’s concept of leadership - The Nation | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The Buddhist concept of leadership as it is exemplified in the life of the Buddha has many unique features in addition to the usual leadership qualities that social-psychologists enlist today. The most important was that the Buddha never gave the impression to his followers that he was imposing leadership on them. He wanted maintain that there was the possibility to his followers to attain the same heights and become his equals. The role he wanted to play was that of a kind teacher who showed the way for excellence which was not an impossible goal for the followers.
David Hain's insight:

Buddha's leadership style!

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The 12 Steps of Taking Ourselves a Little Less Seriously -

The 12 Steps of Taking Ourselves a Little Less Seriously - | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Recovering a sense of humor may be just the change we need.
Via F. Thunus, Sushma Sharma
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Why you need to listen to your 360 feedback - a window on your awareness

Why you need to listen to your 360 feedback - a window on your awareness | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
"Why do you see the speck that is in your brother’s eye, when you do not see the plank in your own?"

This famous phrase from the Gospel of Luke captures a basic truth: what we see in others, we cannot or do not want to see in ourselves.

We all have blind spots, and we all need to improve our self-awareness. I still remember an innocent joke played on me when I was in first grade. As is traditional on April 1st, someone stuck a little paper fish to my back: all my classmates saw it and laughed, except me. It sounds like such a trivial thing, but the feeling that you are unaware of what others are thinking, that they know something about you that you do not, is powerful and destabilizing. A lack of awareness makes us insecure.
David Hain's insight:

How to grow - share feedback, expose yourself, wait for reciprocation --> new perspectives!

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David Hain's curator insight, May 20, 3:56 AM

If workplaces are essentially human endeavours, relationships are critical. So everyone should study the Johari Window and act on it!

Yvan's curator insight, May 21, 12:03 AM
So right
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10 Principles of Strategic Leadership

10 Principles of Strategic Leadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Most companies have leaders with the strong operational skills needed to maintain the status quo. But they are facing a critical deficit: They lack people in positions of power with the know-how, experience, and confidence required to tackle what management scientists call “wicked problems.” Such problems can’t be solved by a single command, they have causes that seem incomprehensible and solutions that seem uncertain, and they often require companies to transform the way they do business. Every enterprise faces these kinds of challenges today.

A 2015 PwC study of 6,000 senior executives, conducted using a research methodology developed by David Rooke of Harthill Consulting and William Torbert of Boston University, revealed just how pervasive this shortfall is. Respondents were asked a series of open-ended questions; their answers revealed their leadership preferences, which were then analyzed to determine which types of leaders were most prominent. Only 8 percent of the respondents turned out to be strategic leaders, or those effective at leading transformations (Rooke and Torbert refer to them as “strategist” leaders).
David Hain's insight:

There ain't many strategist thinkers out there, according to adult development research!  Some sound principles here to address the issue.

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Ian Berry's curator insight, May 20, 6:16 PM
Good insights My favourite is "make it safe to fail"
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Attracting the right talent isn’t just about the money

Attracting the right talent isn’t just about the money | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
1] Do employees see a sense of purpose in their work?
2] Do they feel a sense of social recognition and pride beyond monetary reward?
3] Does the workplace forge a sense of community and belonging?

Failing to take these non-monetary elements into consideration can mean that many employers are aren’t attracting the right people, or worse, paying way more than they need to keep the wrong crew aboard.  

So it isn’t just about the money; Meaning can go a long way in building the right team.
David Hain's insight:

How does your workplace measure up to the talent chat lenses? It's not about the money, money, money...

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Take Your Leadership off Autopilot

Take Your Leadership off Autopilot | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Autopilot is about habit. It’s about operating based on habit rather than consciously responding to the situation and circumstances surrounding you. When you are in autopilot mode, it’s like you have blinders on; you miss many signs, symptoms, and opportunities. Autopilot plays a role in every area of our lives. It becomes particularly concerning when it starts to impact the behaviors of leaders. So, how can you take your leadership off autopilot?
David Hain's insight:

Challenging habits - how do you do against these 3 tests? Good challenge from Liz Stincelli @infinitestin.

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How to go from good to great | London Business School

How to go from good to great | London Business School | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
What turns a manager into a leader? Professor of Organisational Behaviour, Randall S Peterson, suggests some answers.
David Hain's insight:

How to accelerate your personal leadership development. Not surprisingly, self-awareness, strengths and values feature heavily!

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Radical Wisdom for a Company, a School, a Life

What if your job didn’t control your life? Brazilian CEO Ricardo Semler practices a radical form of corporate democracy, rethinking everything from board meetings to how workers report their vacation days (they don’t have to). 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
David Hain's insight:

All leaders should review Semlers work, even if they disagree with it!

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David Hain's curator insight, December 4, 2015 8:06 AM

Required viewing to make you think, even if you don't go a quarter as far as Semler has!

Hector Cortez's curator insight, March 23, 12:19 AM

Required viewing to make you think, even if you don't go a quarter as far as Semler has!

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 14, 10:23 AM
His book Maverick is a great read. He proposes sitting together, talking with each other, and listening to each other. The corporate rules are 21 captioned cartoons.
Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.