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The #1 Shift to Move from Management to Leadership - Forbes

The #1 Shift to Move from Management to Leadership - Forbes | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Converting complexity to clarity may be the most critical competency to move us from management effectiveness to leadership excellence.


Via Gary Morrison
David Hain's insight:

Complexity to clarity - hallmark of the best leaders!

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Rim Riahi's curator insight, March 3, 2013 2:45 AM

Converting complexity to clarity may be the most critical competency to move us from management effectiveness to leadership excellence.

Kudos's curator insight, March 11, 2013 1:28 PM

About time. Seems like common sense. Kick out the wonks.

Coaching Leaders
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Companies headed by introverts performed better in a study of thousands of CEOs

Companies headed by introverts performed better in a study of thousands of CEOs | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

The type of CEO who lands on the cover of business magazines has a big, outgoing personality, all the better to charm investors, win over partners and rally employees. But what if companies run by extroverts did poorly? What if companies fared better in the hands of introverts? 

David Hain's insight:

Myth busted! B***S*** doesn't always baffle brains!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, August 9, 5:29 PM

Interesting, could the be better classified as ambiverts?

JASON CAVNESS's curator insight, August 10, 2:49 PM
It would seem introverts perform extroverts as CEOs and in my opinion as leaders in general. But of course being an introvert, I am biased.
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How to Overcome Destructive Anger

How to Overcome Destructive Anger | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Like all emotions, anger serves a purpose, typically alerting us that we are suffering from some form of distress. This is important, because although anger can be uncomfortable mentally and physically, it can also motivate us to address our underlying needs, desires, or perceived threats. It’s unprocessed anger that can lead to conflict, social isolation, problems at work, substance abuse, depression, shame, and even incarceration.
In my new book, Overcoming Destructive Anger: Strategies That Work, I outline what I’ve learned about the nature of anger—what triggers it, how it affects our bodies and our minds, and what we can do to manage it effectively. Luckily, there are ways to maintain a healthy dose of anger without letting it rule you—whether you’re an average person trying to manage the stresses of everyday life or a star basketball player.
David Hain's insight:

We all get angry, but how healthy is your anger?

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, August 6, 4:56 PM

This is a vital topic for everyone today because there is too much destructive anger around. The key is being self-aware of where the line is and staying on the good side.

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The Two Things Killing Your Ability to Focus

The Two Things Killing Your Ability to Focus | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Two major challenges are destroying our ability to focus.

First, we increasingly are overwhelmed with distractions flying at us from various connected devices. Smartphone and tablet use is spiking, and we now use digital media for an average of over 12 hours per day. This hyperconnected state does not allow us to process, recharge, and refocus.

Second, we rely excessively on meetings as the default form of interaction with other people at work. Studies indicate that we spend anywhere from 35%–55% of our time, and sometimes much more, in meetings. If we want to stay focused on truly meaningful activity, something has to change.

You and your business will benefit greatly if you can address these issues.
David Hain's insight:

How much are you in control of your agenda?

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, August 6, 4:54 PM

We talk about distracted driving all the time but do little about it, how much more are we subject to distracted leadership?

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Emotional Intelligence For Leaders

Emotional Intelligence For Leaders | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
had the pleasure and honor of interviewing Peter Cook, renowned author of 7 books and innovator of The Academy of Rock and Human Dynamics. Peter has created a unique, synthesizing business, music, and science as transferable lessons on business leadership, creativity, innovation, strategy, and change management. Having won a prize for his work from Sir Richard Branson, he now works for Virgin and is a visionary in his field. His approach covers all aspects of leadership and team development so that the organization is operating harmoniously. Music, being a universal language, speaks to us all and using the multifaceted aspects of music can be applied to any business.
David Hain's insight:

@AcademyOfRock, Peter Cook, rockin' EQ with Melinda Fouts! Entertaining and apposite!

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What CEOs are reading | McKinsey & Company

What CEOs are reading | McKinsey & Company | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The slightly lazier days of summer are upon the northern hemisphere, with beach vacations beckoning. South of the equator, temperatures are dipping and cozy weekends lie ahead. So what books will corporate leaders be reading in the coming months? Here are recommendations from more than a dozen, including McKinsey’s Dominic Barton, JPMorgan Chase’s Jamie Dimon, LinkedIn’s Reid Hoffman, and Corning’s Wendell Weeks. It’s an eclectic list of fiction and nonfiction, spanning everything from classics to newcomers, business topics to biographies and folk tales.
David Hain's insight:

Really interesting reading list with many suggestions that are new to me. Interesting insight into CEO minds.

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History tells us what may happen next with Brexit & Trump — Medium

History tells us what may happen next with Brexit & Trump — Medium | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
It seems we’re entering another of those stupid seasons humans impose on themselves at fairly regular intervals. I am sketching out here opinions based on information, they may prove right, or may prove wrong, and they’re intended just to challenge and be part of a wider dialogue.
David Hain's insight:

Will there be an Archduke Ferdinand moment? excellent provocation about our times, worth reading!

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8 Qualities Of The World's First Michelin-Starred Street Food Chef

8 Qualities Of The World's First Michelin-Starred Street Food Chef | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

For 30 years, he has worked 100 hours a week and in the last 8 years, he has been selling chicken noodle for less US$2 a plate. Today, Mr Chan Hon Meng's small and modest soya sauce chicken stall made dinning history as it became the first street food stall in the world to win a Michelin star.

David Hain's insight:

Many leadership lessons in this fantastic story!

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What does a brain-savvy leader look like?

What does a brain-savvy leader look like? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
One of the most obvious applications of neuroscience is in the leadership of a business. This article pulls together the elements that make a leader successful. We talk about these elements through the lens of what we know about how the brain functions.

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We believe and our research bears out that understanding how the brain works is one way of helping leaders become more effective. We call this brain-savvy leading.

There are a number of elements which make up this type of leading. Some are about how leaders interact with their people, both their followers and their peers, while other elements are about how leaders understand themselves.
David Hain's insight:

How much do you know about neuroscience? It could improve your leadership. A brief 101 here!

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Are You Over-Functioning in Your Leadership Role?

Are You Over-Functioning in Your Leadership Role? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Most people want to work for a caring boss. Not only is it more enjoyable, it’s good for your health, according to research by Stanford professor Jeffrey Pfeffer. Compassion is certainly a hallmark of leadership effectiveness. But can a leader care too much? Shelley Row, a professional engineer and former transportation executive believes that caring for one’s employees, while admirable, does have its drawbacks. It can stunt your team members’ professional and personal growth. Moreover, misplaced concern and worry can overload leaders.

Row’s book, Think Less, Live More: Lessons from a Recovering Over-Thinker explores the ways in which leaders might “over-function,” meaning they assume more control or responsibility over a situation than is required. Over-functioning and micromanagement share a common element: the refusal to release control. Strangely enough, the act of “caring”, when taken too far, is a control issue. For example, when a leader avoids making difficult decisions because he is concerned about an employee’s reaction, he has crossed the line from compassion into over-functioning. It’s as if the leader has assumed responsibility for an employee’s reaction to the situation, thereby transferring who “owns” (or controls) the emotion from the employee to the manager.
David Hain's insight:

It seems leaders can care too much? Do you agree? how do you find the balance?

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New Research: Rethinking the Leadership Industry

New Research: Rethinking the Leadership Industry | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
In an essay published in the July 2016 issue of Daedalus, the journal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Barbara Kellerman, James MacGregor Burns Lecturer in Public Leadership at Harvard Kennedy School, argues that the “leadership industry’s” focus on single individuals has hampered its ability to improve the human condition. The title of Kellerman’s essay, “Leadership—It’s a System, Not a Person!,” sums up both her main thrust and her frustration with the industry’s constant elevation of single leaders at the expense of other important facets of leadership.
David Hain's insight:

Leadership - systemic approach needed rather than the search for heroes! Right on, Barbara Kellerman!

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The Dangerous Leadership Readiness Gap Today And How To Close It - Forbes

The Dangerous Leadership Readiness Gap Today And How To Close It - Forbes | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Businesses are growing larger by the day. Unfortunately, the number of effective leaders ready to take the reins is dwindling.  After adjusting for inflation, the 500th-ranked company in the Fortune 500 is nearly five times bigger in terms of revenue than it was in 1990. That means more leaders with much larger spans of control are crucial for success. Yet, only 25% of organizations say they have the leaders ready to meet tomorrow’s business challenges. Time and again, corporate executives are finding themselves delaying or withdrawing strategic priorities because they don’t have leaders ready to take them on. That’s bad news for these businesses and our economies.
David Hain's insight:

Getting leaders ready quicker by giving them real responsibility, challenge and support...

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Leaders in Transition: The Cards Are Stacked Against You | Linkage, Inc.

Leaders in Transition: The Cards Are Stacked Against You | Linkage, Inc. | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The facts are startling and the data is clear—no matter where you look and regardless of what research you read, between 30–70% of transitioning leaders fail. Nearly 40% of internal job moves made by people identified by their companies as “high potentials” end in failure (Martin & Schmidt, 2010) and 40% of executives hired at the senior level are pushed out, fail or quit within 18 months (Bradt, Check & Lawler, 2016). Commonly, this is caused by failure to step into the role at anticipated proficiency levels and generate the expected results.

Worst case scenario, there is outright failure to perform, and the leader is let go and has to be replaced. If you are responsible for helping others drive change and transition in your organization, you need to be asking: “Are we setting our leaders up for success or failure?”

If you are a leader taking on a new role, have recently joined a new organization, or are in the midst of an organizational transition with a new team, new location, or new stakeholders—you need to be asking: “What will it take for me to succeed? What do I need to do to ensure my success?”
David Hain's insight:

Valuable insights from Linkage on how to navigate leadership transitions successfully!

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Groupthink: avoid the drive to conformity

Groupthink: avoid the drive to conformity | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Back in 2007 I ran a session for senior traders in a financial services organisation.

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A participant was presenting a project about a complex new financial product to the room. As the presentation rolled on, one person, let’s call him Bill, kept looking at the PowerPoint and back at his colleagues. The rest of the group were enthralled by this clever way to make money.

When the slide show ended, the presenter asked for questions. The first one he got was from Bill and this was it: “Is this even legal?”.

Did the group pause to think about Bill’s question? Did the presenter answer it? Not exactly. What happened was this: the group laughed. One person threw a pen cap at Bill.

It turned out that the new financial product was called a Collateral Debt Obligation (CDO), and it was taking the financial world by storm. It was the type of derivative that was almost single-handedly responsible for the 2008 meltdown. Unless you’ve read up on the causes of the crash you’ll probably know CDOs as what they should be called: “Toxic Debt”.

What I saw that day was groupthink in action. A function of group pressure impairing critical thinking and discounting dissent, groupthink leads to decisions with a foreseeable negative impact. This is for the simple reason that to stand in opposition is perceived as too risky a step.
David Hain's insight:

How a monoculture can lead to group think - and danger!

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Rising Strong: Brené Brown on the Physics of Vulnerability and What Resilient People Have in Common

Rising Strong: Brené Brown on the Physics of Vulnerability and What Resilient People Have in Common | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
“There is no science without fancy, and no art without facts,” Vladimir Nabokov famously proclaimed. Today, hardly anyone embodies this sentiment more fully than Brené Brown, who came of age as a social scientist in an era when the tyranny of facts trivialized the richness of fancy and the human experience was squeezed out of the qualitative in the service of the quantitative, the two pitted as polarities. But like Susan Sontag, who recognized how polarities limit and imprison us, Brown defied these dogmatic dichotomies and went on to become what she calls a “researcher-storyteller” — a social scientist who studies the complexities and nuances of the human experience with equal regard for data and story, enriching story with data and ennobling data with story in a quest to “find knowledge and truth in a full range of sources.”

In Rising Strong (public library), Brown builds upon her earlier work on vulnerability to examine the character qualities, emotional patterns, and habits of mind that enable people to transcend the catastrophes of life, from personal heartbreak to professional collapse, and emerge not only unbroken but more whole.
David Hain's insight:

Resilience - it's a buzz word for a reason. Brene Brown and Brain Pickings on why - excellent!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, July 19, 2:21 PM

Thanks for sharing David Hain - Excellent article.  You're correct in stating that "resilience" is a buzzword today.

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Why Nice Bosses Finish First

Why Nice Bosses Finish First | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Overly tough bosses create stress, and lots of it, as the research shows: A University of London study found an especially strong link between heart disease and boss-inflicted stress, while a University of Concordia study found that employees who rate themselves as highly stressed added 46% to their employer’s health care costs. Research from the Institute of Naval Medicine found that overly tough bosses cause people to seek jobs elsewhere, to perform at a lower level, to decline promotions, and even to quit. Finally, a survey from Randstad Consulting showed that most employees would trade in their bosses for better ones rather than receive a $5,000 pay raise. People don’t leave jobs; they leave bad bosses.

The thing is, nice bosses don’t just prevent health and motivational problems among their employees; they create massive benefits that hard-nosed bosses can’t.
David Hain's insight:

If you're a boss, play nice to win. We'll, don't play, just bring out your best and others will follow...

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David Hain's curator insight, July 19, 5:15 AM

If you're a boss, play nice to win. We'll, don't play, just bring out your best and others will follow...

Ian Berry's curator insight, July 22, 12:48 AM
Great list of leadership characterisitics and love the John Maxwell quote too
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Don't Seek Harmony, Seek Conflict! - My Own Coach Limited

Don't Seek Harmony, Seek Conflict! - My Own Coach Limited | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Change means movement. Movement means friction. Only in the frictionless vacuum of a nonexistent abstract world can movement or change occur without that abrasive friction of conflict.
Saul Alinsky
David Hain's insight:

If we celebrate difference, we need to get good at managing different views. Welcome conflict, don't bury it! Nice piece form @kjcoach!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, July 19, 2:23 PM

Seeking conflict can be a good thing but how you approach it and deal with it can be explosive if not handled correctly.

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The Scientific Reason Why Coworking May Be The Future Of Work

The Scientific Reason Why Coworking May Be The Future Of Work | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

A team of researchers at the University of Michigan’s Steven M. Ross School of Business led by business professor Dr. Gretchen Spreitzer, who also directs the Center for Positive Organizations, has spent the last four years studying coworking. In the process, they've interviewed the founders of coworking companies around the U.S. and surveyed more than 200 workers from dozens of coworking spaces; one team member spent six months as a coworking member.

Their research uncovered two key benefits to the coworking experience, both of which have been linked to improved employee performance. Simplified somewhat, it comes down to flexibility and autonomy without dispensing with meaningful community.

It turns out that coworking spaces' hallmarks—like funky design features—are far less important than their social structures, where workers feel a sense of individual autonomy that's still linked to a sense of collaboration, the Michigan team told me in interviews. Most coworking spaces, for all their variation, tend to strike that careful balance between those crucial needs—in ways that neither solo freelancing nor the traditional office experience usually provide.

David Hain's insight:

Cowering is booming as people increasingly discover the benefits of collaboration!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, July 19, 2:24 PM

Some interesting insights, what do you think?

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3 Uncommon Ways To Drive Happiness In The Workplace

3 Uncommon Ways To Drive Happiness In The Workplace | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
According to Shawn Achor, positive psychology expert and New York Times best-selling author of The Happiness Advantage, "data now abounds showing that happy workers produce higher sales, perform better in leadership, and earn higher job performance ratings and pay. Study after study shows that feelings of happiness lead people to excel in their jobs."

I recently had the opportunity to meet with Achor and asked him to share some of the best ways workplace managers can directly influence greater happiness in their teams. Here are three leadership practices I found to be the most uncommon and useful:
David Hain's insight:

Are you working on the Losada Ratio in your organisation? Maybe you should be...

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Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, July 19, 4:46 AM
3 Uncommon Ways To Drive Happiness In The Workplace
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, July 19, 2:27 PM

Thanks for sharing David Hain.  I agree the Losada Ratio should be embraced by many companies but in our negative world a 6:1 positive communication ratio will be difficult to muster.

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Give the Gift of Listening - People Development Network

Give the Gift of Listening - People Development Network | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
How often have you been in what you call “a conversation” (for lack of a better word) that is completely one-sided?  For example, one of the people in the conversation is doing 90% of the talking and even if the other person manages to get in a word or two, the other person either responds immediately or continues on their rant.  One of my favourite life lessons is to “listen to understand, not to respond”.  Unfortunately, in my experience, 90% of the population does not do this.  They want to help.  They want to respond.  They want to be heard.  They want their opinion to be heard.  They want their opinion to be adapted…..

On a more positive note, I have been fortunate enough be on the receiving end of the gift of listening.  It is an amazing feeling to really have someone listen to what you have to say, to be curious about what you are saying and why you are saying it.  Instead of responding with their opinion or their experience, they respond with empathy and understanding.  It provides an incredible connection between two people.  Listening is an important skill for all of us, but as Leaders, it is even more important.  As a Leader, listening to others gives you the opportunity to really connect with your colleagues and to  understand how they are feeling about what is going on in your organization.  It also brings respect for you from your team because they know that their opinion and thoughts are being heard and are valuable.

Imagine how it would feel if you could give someone the gift of listening.  It takes a lot of practice and discipline to control the urge to provide input and opinion, but most of the time, that is not what people want.  They want to be SEEN, HEARD, and UNDERSTOOD.  This is a common need of all human beings.

I urge you to try these few things.
David Hain's insight:

We all benefit form a good listening to! And we tend to get what we give...Go figure!

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The end of capitalism has begun

The end of capitalism has begun | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The red flags and marching songs of Syriza during the Greek crisis, plus the expectation that the banks would be nationalised, revived briefly a 20th-century dream: the forced destruction of the market from above. For much of the 20th century this was how the left conceived the first stage of an economy beyond capitalism. The force would be applied by the working class, either at the ballot box or on the barricades. The lever would be the state. The opportunity would come through frequent episodes of economic collapse.

Instead over the past 25 years it has been the left’s project that has collapsed. The market destroyed the plan; individualism replaced collectivism and solidarity; the hugely expanded workforce of the world looks like a “proletariat”, but no longer thinks or behaves as it once did.

If you lived through all this, and disliked capitalism, it was traumatic. But in the process technology has created a new route out, which the remnants of the old left – and all other forces influenced by it – have either to embrace or die. Capitalism, it turns out, will not be abolished by forced-march techniques. It will be abolished by creating something more dynamic that exists, at first, almost unseen within the old system, but which will break through, reshaping the economy around new values and behaviours. I call this postcapitalism.
David Hain's insight:

The brilliant Paul Mason explains postcapitalism as lucidly as ever. A MUST READ!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, July 16, 4:28 PM

Post capitalism is something most people don't understand nor do they want to but it is an important discussion.

Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, July 19, 4:49 AM
The end of capitalism has begun
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Five Essentials to Great Project Leadership

Five Essentials to Great Project Leadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Using the sinking of the Titanic as an example and contrasting it with the story of the Shackleton expedition to Antarctica, this paper describes how project managers can take specific leadership actions that will contribute to project success. Detailing the different types and styles of leadership, the paper draws from a large body of research and from the fields of ethics, trust, and professional conduct and gives emphasis to high-performance teams. Project managers can reduce project risk and become successful project leaders by taking the actions identified.
David Hain's insight:

Useful paper on leadership encompassing many sources.

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Four 'Mission: Impossible' Leadership Lessons - Forbes

Four 'Mission: Impossible' Leadership Lessons - Forbes | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
“Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to lead your organization to success. Should you or any member of your team fail, the CEO (or Board of Directors, or stockholders) will disavow you. Then you will self-destruct in five seconds.”

If there’s one thing that fans of the Mission: Impossible series of movies know, the IMF (Impossible Mission Force) will do whatever is necessary to protect the world. Unlike the IMF’s Ethan Hunt (played with almost-impossible energy and derring-do by Tom Cruise), most corporate leaders don’t have goals that are absolutely and unquestionably for the greater good of the greater number, but that doesn’t mean that Mr. Hunt doesn’t have great leadership lessons to teach:
David Hain's insight:

Is being a CEO like having Mission Impossible? Yes, but Tom Cruise has made many films showing how to succeed...

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Watch Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz explain globalization in three minutes

Watch Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz explain globalization in three minutes | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Watch Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz explain a contested and complex phenomenon: globalization.
David Hain's insight:

This is the world we have to make sense of...need for leadership recognising and making sense of complexity!

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Adapting your board to the digital age | McKinsey & Company

Adapting your board to the digital age | McKinsey & Company | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
To serve as effective thought partners, boards must move beyond an arms-length relationship with digital issues (exhibit). Board members need better knowledge about the technology environment, its potential impact on different parts of the company and its value chain, and thus about how digital can undermine existing strategies and stimulate the need for new ones. They also need faster, more effective ways to engage the organization and operate as a governing body and, critically, new means of attracting digital talent. Indeed, some CEOs and board members we know argue that the far-reaching nature of today’s digital disruptions—which can necessitate long-term business-model changes with large, short-term costs—means boards must view themselves as the ultimate catalysts for digital transformation efforts. Otherwise, CEOs may be tempted to pass on to their successors the tackling of digital challenges.
David Hain's insight:

Why you need your Board to be a strong digital sparring partner!

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Primal Leadership: The Hidden Driver of Great Performance

Primal Leadership: The Hidden Driver of Great Performance | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
When the theory of emotional intelligence at work began to receive widespread attention, we frequently heard executives say—in the same breath, mind you—“That’s incredible,” and, “Well, I’ve known that all along.” They were responding to our research that showed an incontrovertible link between an executive’s emotional maturity, exemplified by such capabilities as self-awareness and empathy, and his or her financial performance. Simply put, the research showed that “good guys”—that is, emotionally intelligent men and women—finish first.

We’ve recently compiled two years of new research that, we suspect, will elicit the same kind of reaction. People will first exclaim, “No way,” then quickly add, “But of course.” We found that of all the elements affecting bottom-line performance, the importance of the leader’s mood and its attendant behaviors are most surprising. That powerful pair set off a chain reaction: The leader’s mood and behaviors drive the moods and behaviors of everyone else. A cranky and ruthless boss creates a toxic organization filled with negative underachievers who ignore opportunities; an inspirational, inclusive leader spawns acolytes for whom any challenge is surmountable. The final link in the chain is performance: profit or loss.

David Hain's insight:

Old but gold! Coleman, Boyatzis and McKee on the findings that led to EQ. Worth reviewing!

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Ricard Lloria's comment, July 13, 1:00 PM
Great David to share, great article from biggers, hugs
Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, July 19, 4:56 AM
Primal Leadership: The Hidden Driver of Great Performance
Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.