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Six Common Misperceptions about Teamwork

Six Common Misperceptions about Teamwork | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
This post is part of the HBR Insight Center Making Collaboration Work. Teamwork and collaboration are critical to mission achievement in any organization that has to respond quickly to changing circumstances.

Via Karen Rockhold, Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, February 5, 2013 6:40 AM

Teamwork is a frustrating as it is rewarding.  Here are a few insights about how to make the most out of collaboration.  

Rachelle Wooten's curator insight, February 5, 2013 10:07 AM

My favorite quote: "Conflict, when well managed and focused on a team's objectives, can generate more creative solutions than one sees in conflict-free groups."  All too often conflict is avoided maybe because it is poorly managed but if it's focused on team's goal or mission can be most beneficial.

donhornsby's curator insight, February 14, 2013 8:26 AM

(From the article):The hands-on activities of group leaders do make a difference. But the most powerful thing a leader can do to foster effective collaboration is to create conditions that help members competently manage themselves. The second most powerful thing is to launch the team well. And then, third, is the hands-on teaching and coaching that leaders do after the work is underway. Our research suggests that condition-creating accounts for about 60% of the variation in how well a team eventually performs; that the quality of the team launch accounts for another 30%; and that real-time coaching accounts for only about 10%. Leaders are indeed important in collaborative work, but not in the ways we usually think.

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12 signs you're an extroverted introvert

12 signs you're an extroverted introvert | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Do you have a love/hate relationship with other people in general? You might be an extroverted introvert. 

Online quizzes and HR personality indicators like to put us into clear, easy-to-read boxes.

People think you must be either an "extrovert"; i.e. somebody that thrives being around others, or an "introvert", somebody who is best left alone. But not both.

Extroverted introverts know that the way you prefer to interact with the world isn't fixed. It's a sliding scale, which you'll understand if the following 12 things resonate with you. 
David Hain's insight:

Sometimes called ambivert, this is me and zillions of others. Some people are and, not either/or!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, March 28, 10:49 AM

Being an ambivert I can readily identify with this article.  Your thoughts?

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How Bosses Can Make or Break Leadership Development Programs

How Bosses Can Make or Break Leadership Development Programs | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
CCL’s study of leadership development program alumni found the degree of support from participants’ bosses for their development activities made a significant impact on several outcomes. Selfawareness, leadership capability, leadership effectiveness, and engagement were
all significantly improved when participants had the support of their bosses.

For organizations investing in the development of their people—whether individual contributors or c-suite executives—this research means that participant engagement with a leadership development program is not the only factor influencing outcomes. Maximizing the value of leadership development initiatives requires organizations and their training and development partners to constructively engage bosses as well as participants.

This has important implications for individual leadership development program design as well as broader organizational and leadership development efforts. Companies are increasingly requiring a clear return on investment from leadership development programs and looking for ways to ensure such initiatives have a sustained impact. Engaging bosses is a key ingredient in that effort.
David Hain's insight:

Don't just spend leadership development money on those hi-potentials. Brief,debrief and coach them! Your follow-up is crucial!

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donhornsby's curator insight, March 22, 8:18 AM
The study suggests that when it comes to boss support, a little goes a long way.
 
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, March 23, 11:21 AM

Title says it all because it is true.

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How to Instill a Coaching Culture

How to Instill a Coaching Culture | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Take a moment and ask yourself these 2 questions:

One, do you believe you have more potential than your current performance level?

And two, if yes, what’s the cost of opportunity of not using that potential more often?

If you think like the overwhelming majority of the 200 senior executives I spoke to at a recent conference, then you answered yes to the first question, and a lot of money and time for the second.

This is problematic on a variety of fronts, and coaching has proved to be one of the best means of addressing this. Coaching is a business imperative, not a nice perk. It helps leaders and talent achieve their personal best, to swiftly adjust to the demands of their environment, and to expand their personal level of impact.

If you lead a human resources department, you need to think about how you can create a culture of coaching that will better enable your organization to reach its potential.
David Hain's insight:

Too much transactional discussions and not enough about the future? There's a way to change the conversation and it's really cost-effective!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, March 22, 9:10 PM

Wow, I wish it were that easy.  Coaching is relational with some layers of transactional but this describes it as all transactional.  

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Skills for the Future: Break Patterns and Surprise Yourself, says Harvard’s Michael Puett

Skills for the Future: Break Patterns and Surprise Yourself, says Harvard’s Michael Puett | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
What are the key skills for the future? In our special multi-part series, experts share valuable and surprising insights we can use to build tomorrow’s world. In this part Harvard professor Michael Puett explains the skill of breaking patterns and its impact on your life, your leadership, and on the people you interact with.
The best thing about listening to someone who challenges your day-to-day assumptions is that you learn something about yourself. Michael Puett, Harvard’s tall and boyish-looking expert on ancient China, certainly made me think when he explained how we are ruled by patterns, and how we can live better lives if we learn to break those patterns. I felt sorry when his talk at The School of Life (London, February 2017) came to an end after 2 hours. I would like to meet him again.
Here are the best insights Michael Puett shared with us in London (I leave his high-pitched voice and frequent smiles to your imagination):
David Hain's insight:

What are the patterns in your life. maybe they are the key to your growth...?

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Tom Wojick's curator insight, March 21, 10:04 AM

One of the competencies of the 6 Seconds model of emotional intelligence is Recognizing Patterns. It was one of the most powerful and revealing one for me. Patterns operate under our radar, but learning to be aware of our emotions that cue our patterns is critical to changing and breaking a pattern that is not working for you.

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, March 21, 2:25 PM

What do you think?

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A Balanced Scorecard for Leaders

A Balanced Scorecard for Leaders | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The prevailing logic is that leaders are responsible for results. Therefore we should evaluate leaders as follows:

Good results = good leader
Average results = average leader
Bad results = bad leader
Simple and straightforward.

But not very accurate.

Good leaders will sometimes fail.

Bad leaders do sometimes succeed.

So why does this belief persist?
David Hain's insight:

"One-dimensional focus produces one-dimensional leaders" ~ Scott Mabry, aka @soul2work

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, March 21, 2:24 PM

Balanced scorecards can be good if they are flexible enough to handle business today.  Most are not.

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MBAs as CEOs: Some troubling evidence | Henry Mintzberg

MBAs as CEOs: Some troubling evidence | Henry Mintzberg | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Business schools have become enormously successful, in some respects deservedly so. They do a great deal of significant research (Harvard now especially so). In universities, they are centers of interdisciplinary work, bringing together psychologists, sociologists, economists, historians, mathematicians, and others. And their MBA programs do well in training for the business functions, such as finance and marketing, if not for management. So why do they persist in promoting this education for management, which, according to mounting evidence, produces so much mismanagement?

The answer is unfortunately obvious: with so many of their graduates getting to the “top”, why change? But there is another answer that is also becoming obvious: because at this top, too many of their graduates are corrupting the economy.7

David Hain's insight:

Henry Minzberg on a crusade against Business Schools and the Holy Grail of the MBA!

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Steve Bax's curator insight, March 21, 6:47 AM
Fascinating. Makes for very concerning reading. 
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The Conversation About Basic Income is a Mess. Here's How to Make Sense of It. - Evonomics

The Conversation About Basic Income is a Mess. Here's How to Make Sense of It. - Evonomics | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Universal Basic Income(UBI) is either absolutely bonkers pie-in-the-sky thinking or an ingenious idea whose time has come – depending on whom you ask. A litany of recent articles argue for and against the idea of giving every resident of a society or economy a guaranteed income stream, usually sufficient to live above the poverty line, regularly and into perpetuity. Those arguing for say that it offers a potential new awakening of cultural expression, as well as dismantling the disincentives to work associated with means-tested benefits, while supporting us through an age of automation, and also creating space for reimagining ownership of the commons. Those against say that there’s no such thing as free money, that people would simply stop working, that layabouts get enough as it is, and that it could lead to either the dismantling of capitalism or of the welfare state. Both sides of the argument – each including those from the political left and right – accuse the other of ‘not understanding economics.’ But the fact that people are arguing over whether or not UBI as a whole is a good idea means there’s something very wrong with the narrative. The debate we have today is rooted in a false dichotomy. It should be very difficult to be for or against something as broad and diverse as the ideas parceled up in UBI.
David Hain's insight:

Universal Basic Income - an important idea to know about but means very different things to different people.Here's the 101!

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Explore working style preferences of the C-suite, factors influencing their unique traits, and how they prefer to approach problems and interact with other

Explore working style preferences of the C-suite, factors influencing their unique traits, and how they prefer to approach problems and interact with other | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Business Chemistry in the C-suite
New survey finds C-suite has key differences from general business population
The latest Business Chemistry® research surveyed 661 C-suite executives to learn more about their working styles, the impact of organizational and demographic factors on common characteristics, and the unique traits that set CxOs apart from the typical professional. These findings can help inform current executives on team building, inspire aspirational professionals in shaping their career priorities, and build a better understanding of CxO preferences for anyone who works with them.
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5 Ways to be a Leader Who Turns Heads

5 Ways to be a Leader Who Turns Heads | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

It’s an ego boost to sit in the power chair and see heads turn in your direction. You enjoy it. You come to expect it.

The beginning of the leadership journey is about getting heads turning in your direction. As time passes, you see that leadership is about turning heads toward each other.

David Hain's insight:

@Leadershipfreak blogs - 2 minute reads containing a lifetime of leadership wisdom!

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shazia.wj's curator insight, March 15, 2:40 AM
The beginning of the leadership journey is about getting heads turning in your direction. As time passes, you see that leadership is about turning heads toward each other.
donhornsby's curator insight, March 15, 10:28 AM
Pour into your leadership if you expect amazing results from your leadership.
 
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, March 15, 10:47 AM

What do you think?

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What is the value of trust to companies? 

What is the value of trust to companies?  | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Over the years there have been hundreds of academic studies that correlate high trust to profitability, yet organizations continue to take trust for granted. It is viewed as a soft intangible or ignored altogether until a crisis hits the organization. Then leaders talk about rebuilding trust when it never really existed in the first place. Trust is a measurable asset. After eight years of collecting data in a systematic way, we are seeing that the most trustworthy companies are also the most profitable.
In low-trust companies, decisions take longer, innovation is slower, employee engagement is low and turnover is higher. All of these “costs” impede profitability in the long term. Being untrustworthy means that resources are being wasted and squandered. Sometimes companies that are less trustworthy are successful in the short term, but this success may be short lived.
Despite proof that trust is a tangible and measurable key performance indicator, it is rare for companies to practice it as an intentional business strategy. But there are exceptions. Instead of trying to build trust, some leaders live it. An example would be Howard Schultz. Is Starbucks perfect? No, but it’s one of the most trustworthy companies in our FACTS Framework. Howard not only talks about the value of trust, but almost every leadership action reflects his own values and the corporate culture he has created.

David Hain's insight:

@BarbaraKimmel works tirelessly to promote trust in organisations. Her views are worth paying attention to!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, March 15, 10:00 AM

Too often overlooked today.  Trust is considered optional.

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Powerful Presentation Template Inspired by TED Talks

Sandi Toksvig has been a leading star on British TV for 3 decades. And now she's telling her story and fighting for women's equality around the globe.
David Hain's insight:

Storytelling is a great influence and sensemaking tool for leaders. Here's a story  - and template to demonstrate!

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How to use others' feedback to learn and grow | Sheila Heen | TEDxAmoskeagMillyardWomen

Most efforts to improve individual and organizational learning focus on teaching people how to give feedback. After years of consulting with organizations around the world on how to manage their most challenging conversations, Heen and her colleagues realized they may have been thinking about the problem the wrong way. She explains why, if you want to improve learning in your organization, the smart money is on figuring out how to receive feedback—even off-base or poorly delivered feedback—and use it to fuel growth.

With plenty of examples and a natural charm, Heen delivers a talk that will change the way you think about feedback. Most of us have a love-hate relationship with feedback, but Heen thinks we can learn to embrace it for the valuable tool it is. If we handle it right, we can use it to enhance our performance and strengthen our most important relationships.

A founder of Triad Consulting Group and a lecturer at Harvard Law School, Heen has spent the last 20 years with the Harvard Negotiation Project, developing negotiation theory and practice. Her work takes her throughout the world, helping people and organizations work through their most difficult conversations.

A New York Times bestselling author of two books, she specializes in particularly difficult negotiations – where emotions run high and relationships become strained. An expert often sought out by the media, Sheila is schooled in negotiation daily by her three children
David Hain's insight:

Feedback - the breakfast of champions! And the higher up you are, the less you get...

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5 Leadership Behaviors of Great Culture – Skyscanner People – Medium

5 Leadership Behaviors of Great Culture – Skyscanner People – Medium | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Clearly, the literature that covers how to build a great culture is endless and evolves all the time. In my mind, however, there is always a start and having this behaviors engrained in the team or the company is a critical start of something great. That’s beyond product, skills, or separate teams within an organization. Or the strategy that defines its vision. After all, ‘Culture eats strategy for breakfast.’
David Hain's insight:

Create and role model an environment of respect and the people 9 (and, aggregated, culture) will take care of the rest...

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The Leadership Crisis At Uber

The Leadership Crisis At Uber | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Over the past several months, Uber has been hit with a rash of serious issues. Its corporate culture is not only deleterious it seems rather toxic. It dawned on me that the issues that have sprouted up may be connected and in particular they may be related to Kalanick's own misunderstanding of who he is and how he rolls.
David Hain's insight:

A cautionary tale that hasn't fully played out yet. But I agree with the prediction and sentiment here - Uber is going under!!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, March 13, 12:31 PM

I am finding that disruption often leads to ego problems then turmoil when growth is rapid. Can be healthy when done correctly.

 

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The Facts are True, the News is Fake – INCERTO – Medium

The Facts are True, the News is Fake – INCERTO – Medium | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
It is impossible for anyone to write a perfectly rationally argued document without a segment that, out of context, can be transformed by some dishonest copywriter to appear totally absurd and lend itself to sensationalization, so politicians, charlatans and, more disturbingly, journalists hunt for these segments. “Give me a few lines written by any man and I will find enough to get him hung” goes the saying attributed to Richelieu, Voltaire, Talleyrand, a vicious censor during the French revolution phase of terror, and a few others. As Donald Trump said “The facts are true, the news is fake” –ironically at a press conference in which he suffered the same selective reporting as my RSA event.
David Hain's insight:

In this age of bytes, it's even more important to read the whole debate before making up your mind. Don't let others do it for you!

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Five Signs Your Company Values You -- And Five Signs They Don't

Five Signs Your Company Values You  --  And Five Signs They Don't | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Here are five signs your company values you — and five signs they don't.
David Hain's insight:

How valued do you feel? Maybe you should ask yourself these questions...?

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donhornsby's curator insight, March 14, 9:42 AM
Your company doesn't value you if they tell you they do but when you ask for something — a stapler or a half-day off work — it's viewed as a major inconvenience.
 
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6 Forgotten Leadership Lessons From Childhood

6 Forgotten Leadership Lessons From Childhood | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
You want to know the top lessons in leadership training? It turns out you already know them. They're more or less the same lessons you learned as kids.

The things that your parents and your primary school teachers drilled into you are the same ones the best executive coaches will drill into you to help you be the best leader you can be.

How do I know? I'm one of top leadership coach Marshall Goldsmith's first 25 cohorts of his 'pay it forward' project, 100 Coaches, and he and his amazing cadre of friends--among them Frances Hesselbein, CEO of Frances Hesselbein Leadership Institute and Alan Mulally, former CEO of the Ford Motor Company--and his teammates, Frank Wagner and Chris Coffey, have been teaching us.

So here is a refresher course on the lessons from your childhood that can be applied to the business world.
David Hain's insight:

Leadership is about relationships - this wisdom from the world's leading coaching guru confirms it!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, March 10, 11:46 AM

Life is about relationships, even though we try to feel that we can be an individualist? But why do we feel that way?  We are all dependent on something.

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Gretchen Rubin's Quiz: The Four Tendencies

From Gretchen Rubin: Hello! I created the Four Tendencies framework during my research into habits for my book, Better Than Before.

What’s the secret to making or breaking a habit? To change our habits, we first have to figure out ourselves.
 
When we try to form a new habit, we’re setting an expectation for ourselves. Therefore, to change our habits, it’s crucial to understand how we respond to expectations.
 
We all face outer expectations (meet deadlines, observe traffic regulations) and inner expectations (stop napping, give up sugar).
 
I’ve devised the “Four Tendencies” framework to describe how a person responds to expectations: as Upholder, Questioner, Obliger, or Rebel. If you’d like to figure out your Tendency, take this quiz.

The quiz poses questions meant to identify your Tendency and to cover some standard demographic information; it takes about ten minutes to complete. Answers are confidential and coordinated by a third-party research firm.
 
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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, March 10, 11:47 AM

What are your thoughts on habits?

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What can Executive Coaching Offer Entrepreneurs?

What can Executive Coaching Offer Entrepreneurs? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Executive coaching can be a great investment, but only if you are selective about the services you hire. Entrepreneurs should do their homework to ensure they are getting value for money.

Investigate whether the coach in question has the appropriate skills, experience and tools to get results. Coaches should have substantial experience with a proven track record of success. Authentic coaches will be happy to share references and testimonials. Find a coach who places a premium on confidentiality, while providing a careful mix of challenge and support. The right coach should be able to push their client, but this will only be possible if they have built rapport and the client has a certain level of trust in them.
David Hain's insight:

Coaching is a hugely cost-effective way to improve bottom line and well being. But only if you set clear aims and choose wisely...

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, March 10, 11:50 AM

Great article and worth reviewing but keep in mind it will only work if you actively participate and choose your coach wisely. I always tell my clients that I will not be their coach for life, you have to grow from the conversations.

 

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Your Ability to Focus Has Probably Peaked: Here’s How to Stay Sharp

Your Ability to Focus Has Probably Peaked: Here’s How to Stay Sharp | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Having a hard time focusing lately? You’re not alone. Research shows interruptions occur about every twelve minutes in the workplace, and every three minutes in university settings. In an age of constant digital interruptions, it is no wonder you’re having trouble ignoring distractions.
In their new book, The Distracted Mind: Ancient Brains in a High-Tech World, Dr. Adam Gazzaley, a neuroscientist, and Dr. Larry Rosen, a psychologist, explain how our ability to pay attention works and what we can do to stay focused.
It turns out, attention isn’t as simple as it seems. In fact, paying attention involves two separate functions: “enhancement” (our ability to focus on things that matter) and “suppression” (our ability to ignore the things that don’t). Interestingly, enhancement and suppression are not opposites, they are distinct processes in the brain.
David Hain's insight:

Keeping focused = minimising distractions. right? Turns out it's not that simple, they are 2 different things in our brains...

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How Dogs Help People Get Along Better

How Dogs Help People Get Along Better | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
My dog, Casey, is one of my favorite beings on the planet. Not only is he extremely cute, his presence calms me, makes me happy, and helps me to meet new people…especially when I take a walk with him.
My husband and I often joke that if everyone had a dog like Casey, there simply wouldn’t be any wars—the assumption being that everyone would just get along if he were around. Now, a new study suggests that we might be onto something.
David Hain's insight:

This could be Millie. She has definitely made me a better, fitter, more thoughtful person. I bless the day she entered my life!

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15 Things Leaders Can Manage (and One They Can't) | Jesse Lyn Stoner

15 Things Leaders Can Manage (and One They Can't) | Jesse Lyn Stoner | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
What Leaders Can’t Manage


People.


You can try to influence people or motivate them. You can try to inspire them. You can invite them to join you. But you can’t manage them like you can other things.
People are not things. They have free will. You might get compliance through imposing your authority, but you will not get their commitment or full engagement. And if you push too hard, you will be met with a passive resistance that increases as your own efforts increase.
Understanding how to influence without authority is a key leadership competency. It does not work to say “Do it because I told you so.” Your ability to influence is dependent on your credibility and character, and you must earn their trust.
The most powerful and helpful thing you can do as a leader is to stop trying to manage people, and to focus your efforts on providing leadership that engages the hearts and minds of everyone on your team.
Invite your team to help create a vision of a future you all desire. If you can do that, your people will take care of managing themselves.

David Hain's insight:

Great post from the excellent @JesseLynStoner. Always on the money for leaders!

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Values alignment is not a leadership option!

Values alignment is not a leadership option! | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
In an article written by Christine Comaford in a recent Forbes magazine, titles: “63% of Employees Don’t Trust Their Leader--- and What you can do to Change that.”

Here are her four emotional experiences that cause the lack of trust problems.

1.The sense of injustice.

2. Lack of Hope.

3. Lack of confidence.

4. The desire for change.

 

What is the root of this problem? Lack of Trust! If I don’t trust you, why should I follow you, listen to you, go that ‘extra mile” for you??

When employees don’t trust their leaders that lead to fearing him/her, then fear develops, morale takes a hit, employee engagement decreases work productivity declines, etc.

Seems to me that part of the answer to this dilemma lies in the values-based training of leaders. Values alignment is key to building trust which will, if consistent, overcome the emotional experiences mentioned in the article.
David Hain's insight:

Erosion of trust might just be our single biggest challenge as leaders.

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How To Practice Mindfulness When You Don't Have The Time - Faisal Hoque :: Entrepreneur | Author

How To Practice Mindfulness When You Don't Have The Time - Faisal Hoque :: Entrepreneur | Author | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

From Beethoven to Newton to Buddha to Darwin, all experienced critical awakenings during self-imposed solitary periods. The psychologist and author Rollo May explained this phenomenon very well in his book The Courage to Create. “In order to be open to creativity,” he wrote, “one must have the capacity for constructive use of solitude. One must overcome the fear of being alone.”

Nicola Tesla, one of the greatest innovators of all time, concurred:

The mind is sharper and keener in seclusion and uninterrupted solitude. Originality thrives in seclusion free of outside influences beating upon us to cripple the creative mind. Be alone—that is the secret of invention: Be alone, that is when ideas are born.”

These days, we now have the scientific evidence to back up those claims. Research conducted by Greg Feist of San Jose State University found that when people let their focus shift away from others around them, they’re better able to engage in “metacognition,” the process of thinking critically and reflectively about your own thoughts.

David Hain's insight:

Where/when do you make space for reflection? Mine is a daily dog walk. The important things is to do it!

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What's Your Cultural Profile?

What's Your Cultural Profile? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Find new ideas and classic advice on strategy, innovation and leadership, for global leaders from the world's best business and management experts.
David Hain's insight:

Useful talking point for leaders. Get the survey here.

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Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.