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Leadership Compendium: Leading Forward In the Face of Complexity, Change or Crisis » Just Coach It-The 3Q Edge

Leadership Compendium: Leading Forward In the Face of Complexity, Change or Crisis » Just Coach It-The 3Q Edge | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

HOW?  Shift your mindset

Seeing your strengths and challenges, stressors and turning points, even your most difficult transitions or crises with new eyes that help YOU build your most important advantage, your 3Q Edge™. Yes, learning and unlearning faster and better than before.  Making a pivotal shift in mindset that will help you learn and unlearn faster, develop improved whole brain thinking and embrace a new solution focused philosophy is critical to the reach, resonance and results you seek to achieve. “ Leaders are made rather than born.” Warren Bennis

►WHY? We must distrupt/change what no longer works. Innovation-Actualization-Optimization of Potential is Key

Go ahead and disrupt/change/transform what no longer works. Build a new and better relationship with changes that helps YOU optimize your potential and the potential of others.  Our unsurpassed access to knowledge, information, technology and training alone cannot help us actualize and sustain greater leadership.

 

..... read more: http://justcoachit.com/blog/2013/01/10/leadership-compendium-leading-forward-in-the-face-of-complexity-change-or-crisis/


Via Ricard Lloria, Mercor
David Hain's insight:

I recommend Irene's work. Follow her on @justcoachit for lots of ideas, energy and commitment to a better world.

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Mercor's curator insight, January 11, 2013 1:59 AM

Scooped by Ricard Lloria onto Help and Support everybody around the world

Ricard Lloria's comment, January 11, 2013 4:57 PM
It´s really a pleasure to scoop it!
Coaching Leaders
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Rise by lifting others - GlobalFocus

Rise by lifting others - GlobalFocus | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Many companies confuse purpose, vision and mission statements, often using them interchangeably, blurring their true meaning.

Purpose is what guides you. It articulates why you do what you do, why your organisation exists.
Mission is what drives you. It is the strategic path your organisation follows to fulfil your vision.
Vision is what you aspire to. It is the destination it you wish to reach, the state into which you hope to transform over time.
In other words, Purpose is your why. Mission is your how. Vision is your where and what.
David Hain's insight:

Excellent Mahindra case study by Kenneth Mikkelsen, @LeadershipABC, on how an organisation makes 'purpose-driven' meaningful and practical!

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donhornsby's curator insight, Today, 9:51 AM
Merely looking at what worked in the past will not solve the interconnected challenges we face today. Truly purpose-driven organisations are built on future needs rather than best practices. To become tomorrow’s company, leaders must have the courage to invent future practices, which go beyond today’s predominant management principles. Leaders need to learn from early adopters in this field to progress their thinking, learning, behaving and being.
 
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The Science of Learning: 5 Things to Literally Keep in Mind

The Science of Learning: 5 Things to Literally Keep in Mind | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
While our technology changes at an incredible rate, the brain evolves slowly, allowing for the vast amount of existing cognitive-science research on how the brain takes in information. To create powerful learning experiences, it’s helpful to understand how the brain works. Translating research into meaningful, evidence-based practices, programs, and policies is crucial for learning and development professionals seeking to gain the most impact out of their endeavors.

The five methods by which the brain processes information below will put you on track to improve your own learning and development initiatives.
David Hain's insight:

Understanding our brains is fast becoming a game changing skill for successful people. Useful starter article here!

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The Science Behind What Really Drives Performance (It's Going to Surprise You)

The DDI report reveals a dire need for leaders with the skill of empathy. Only four out of 10 frontline leaders assessed in their massive study were proficient or strong on empathy.

Richard S. Wellins, senior vice president of DDI and one of the authors of the High-Resolution Leadership report, had this to say in a Forbes interview a year ago:

We feel [empathy] is in serious decline. More concerning, a study of college students by University of Michigan researchers showed a 34 percent to 48 percent decline in empathic skills over an eight-year period. These students are our future leaders!

We feel there are two reasons that account for this decline. Organizations have heaped more and more on the plates of leaders, forcing them to limit face-to-face conversations. Again, DDI research revealed that leaders spend more time managing than they do "interacting." They wish they could double their time spent interacting with others. The second reason falls squarely on the shoulders of technology, especially mobile smart devices. These devices have become the de rigueur for human interactions. Sherry Turkle, in her book, Reclaiming Conversation, calls them "sips of conversations."
David Hain's insight:

The state of empathy in leadership - and it's not healthy!

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, June 22, 4:05 PM
Empathy and emotional intelligence are essential to leading and performing. Central to these are face-to-face conversations with people and providing people with time for conversations, instead of relying on digital tools and social media. Sherry Turkle refers to those as "sips of conversation."
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Are You Solving the Right Problems?

Are You Solving the Right Problems? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
How good is your company at problem solving? Probably quite good, if your managers are like those at the companies I’ve studied. What they struggle with, it turns out, is not solving problems but figuring out what the problems are. In surveys of 106 C-suite executives who represented 91 private and public-sector companies in 17 countries, I found that a full 85% strongly agreed or agreed that their organizations were bad at problem diagnosis, and 87% strongly agreed or agreed that this flaw carried significant costs. Fewer than one in 10 said they were unaffected by the issue. The pattern is clear: Spurred by a penchant for action, managers tend to switch quickly into solution mode without checking whether they really understand the problem.

It has been 40 years since Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi and Jacob Getzels empirically demonstrated the central role of problem framing in creativity. Thinkers from Albert Einstein to Peter Drucker have emphasized the importance of properly diagnosing your problems. So why do organizations still struggle to get it right
David Hain's insight:

The importance of taking framing options into account when problem solving.

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, June 14, 1:41 PM
The example of the "slow elevator" underscores a need to reframe what we think problems are. Putting up a mirror is a different way of understanding the problem, as is staggering lunches to reduce peak demands.

What are different ways to look at how schools operate? Might there be old ways i.e. multi-grade classrooms, community schools, changing times, etc?
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, June 15, 5:40 AM

Interesting question.  Too often I think the answer is NO!

Ian Berry's curator insight, June 19, 6:45 PM
I see three opportunities when solving problems. One is framing as this article suggests The other two are solving the underlying cause and secondly taking the opportunity to innovate. Most problem solving returns the status quo instead of moving to a higher level through innovation
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Random Acts Of Leadership™ | The Coaching Habit – An Interview with Michael Bungay Stanier

Random Acts Of Leadership™ | The Coaching Habit – An Interview with Michael Bungay Stanier | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The word “coaching” seems to be used a lot these days. Yet do we really know what “coaching” means or have a shared understanding of what it is?

Michael has a very powerful way of explaining just what coaching is, not as a profession, but rather as a critical skill in leading others. He shows us simple ways to get started in being more coach-like in your leadership.


“Stay curious just a little bit longer and get into action just a little bit slower.”

In our conversation, he offers simple ways to be more “coach-like” in our everyday conversations with others. He suggests it’s okay for you to not have all the answers, even when people come to you for advice.  In fact, Michael shows us how, by developing the coaching habit, you can empower others far more than if you give them your answers.
David Hain's insight:

You don't need to be a coach to ask better questions and listen more deeply to the answers!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, June 15, 5:41 AM

Coaching is a mindset and attitude, not a role or job description.  It is also a calling not a job.

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Eileen Fisher and the Personal Side of Leadership

Eileen Fisher and the Personal Side of Leadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
How much personal growth should leaders expect of their staff or themselves? Is it fair to ask employees, as a condition of fitting in to the organizational culture, to embrace personal growth for themselves? And what should senior leaders do to help people move in the right direction?

In a new video from strategy+business, “Eileen Fisher on Leadership: The Personal Side of Organizational Change,” we see a CEO wrestling with these questions. The founder of the eponymous fashion line, which boasts more than US$300 million in annual revenues and more than 300 retail outlets in 12 countries — as well as more than 60 Eileen Fisher retail stores — has introduced workshops and conversations aimed at the personal growth of employees. The company needs a high level of individual capability and commitment from its employees to reach its goals for global expansion, product quality, environmental sustainability, and suppliers’ working conditions. But Fisher has realized that she can’t demand personal growth from her employees without demonstrating it herself, which also means openly tackling some of the difficult relationship issues that have built up over the years in this 1,200-person company.
David Hain's insight:

Change means everyone - and that means that leaders in particular must demonstrate a commitment to personal growth!

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CEOs Get Paid Too Much, According to Pretty Much Everyone in the World

CEOs Get Paid Too Much, According to Pretty Much Everyone in the World | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
In their recent research, scheduled to be published in a forthcoming issue of Perspectives on Psychological Science, Chulalongkorn University’s Sorapop Kiatpongsan and Harvard Business School’s Michael Norton investigate “what size gaps people desire” and whether those gaps are at all consistent among people from different countries and backgrounds.

It turns out that most people, regardless of nationality or set of beliefs, share similar sentiments about how much CEOs should be paid — and, for the most part, these estimates are markedly lower than the amounts company leaders actually earn.

David Hain's insight:

The data sample  may be less than perfect, but some of these pay ratios are obscene!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, June 7, 11:28 AM

The key is who is perceiving the value to the company and unfortunately the people who know don't have a voice.

Ian Berry's curator insight, June 7, 7:34 PM
Agree with David Hain Obscene and a key part of the challenge raised in previous scoop.
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4 leadership takeaways from the UK election | London Business School

4 leadership takeaways from the UK election | London Business School | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
What is the General Election on 8 June really about: leadership, policies or other issues entirely? And are there lessons for business? There are four universals that apply in both politics and business: First, leadership differs according to where you are in the leadership journey. Second, identity and character are mixed in with more primitive reactions to imagery. Third, the nature of the challenge is not a given. And fourth, the group identity of “followers” can hinder effectiveness. Let’s take a good look at each of these
David Hain's insight:

Given that there have been varied examples of leadership on offer during the election, some useful universal challenges here for politicians and organisational leaders!

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Competition in organizations: good or bad?

Competition in organizations: good or bad? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
This question is wrong.

Competition within organizations is neither good, nor bad. Whether internal competition is useful, constructive and appropriate depends on the level on which we let it happen, or on which it is stimulated or suppressed. In other words: There is an organizational domain where competition is good, and where it makes sense. There is another domain in organizations, however, where competition will inevitably turn dysfunctional, toxic, vicious and destructive.
David Hain's insight:

The dilemma of when to encourage competition!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, June 7, 11:28 AM

Competition can be good or bad but in my opinion it is bad most of the time.

 

 

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Why Trump Was Inevitable — But Recovery Isn’t 

Why Trump Was Inevitable — But Recovery Isn’t  | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

When we employ the Great Leaders Theory of History, we ignore the great and simple truth that a society’s historic leaders are made by its structural and institutional conditions. And by ignoring this truth, simply yearning for Great Leaders to save us, we remain paralyzed and blind — and vulnerable to Caesars, whether they are named Julian or Vladimir.
Angry, unhappy people demand bad leaders, who tear up social contracts. Happy, healthy, sane people don’t. Thus we must produce better followers today if we want better leaders tomorrow. What does “better followers” mean? It means people who aren’t ready to self destruct. Who can think beyond hyperrational, narrow self interest, partisan politics, aren’t ruled by greed, anger, and hate, whose lives aren’t one long sequence of disinformation, pain, and reaction. You can hardly blame people with lives like that for turning into Trumpists — and just blaming them is besides the point entirely.

David Hain's insight:

Why the hero leader is dangerous, and how to change the system to avoid them. Great insight from Umair Haque.

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10 Ways to Build a Go-For-It Culture

10 Ways to Build a Go-For-It Culture | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
It’s difficult for go-for-it leaders to imagine that people are waiting for permission to act. What’s wrong with them?

You take action without asking permission. Why doesn’t everyone else?
David Hain's insight:

2 minutes? 10 great leadership points from Dan Rockwell!

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donhornsby's curator insight, June 5, 9:07 AM
You’re a failure as a leader if people sit around waiting for you to tell them what to do.
 
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, June 7, 12:37 PM

Dan always provides good insights worth reading.

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When a loss is a victory

When a loss is a victory | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Perhaps you are also familiar with this situation: You have prepared for a task perfectly, given it your all and thought through all eventualities. Yet you failed to achieve your goal. Ask yourself, then, if you haven't perhaps gained something different, something much more valuable. Allow that thought to develop and try to see something valuable in your failure to achieve your goal. If your dream employer has rejected you, the path to self-employment might now be open. Or a job that escaped you might allow you to concentrate on certain business areas that you previously lacked the courage to tackle. Remain open-minded and recognize successes – even if they turn out differently from what you would have expected.
David Hain's insight:

A champion learns to deal with failure! And shares a valuable lesson with all of us about reframing...

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, June 7, 12:38 PM

Good insights on all levels

 

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5 Leadership TED Talks That will Inspire You 

5 Leadership TED Talks That will Inspire You  | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
TED Talks are another source of quality, reputable instruction, and inspiration, on everything from entertainment to design to science — and leadership.
These videos, ranging from just three to a little over 20 minutes in length, offer incredible leadership insight. Check them out:
David Hain's insight:

Some great TED talks for leaders, HT Larry Kim!

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Steve Bax's curator insight, June 2, 5:53 AM
The talk by Derek Sivers entitled "How to start a movement" is excellent. The importance of followership is captured perfectly here. 
Jerry Busone's curator insight, June 2, 8:27 AM

Always a good reminder of what a gap we have in leadership development...inspiring 

Fanta C. Sangaré's curator insight, June 13, 3:54 AM
5 conférences TEDx qui font du bien. A planifier dans vos agendas ! J'ai assisté hier soir en direct à celui de Paris, sur le thème DésobéissanceS. Je prépare un papier sur les conf qui m'ont touchée...
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6 Strategies to Reinvent the Way We Lead 

6 Strategies to Reinvent the Way We Lead  | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Inclusive leadership is about fostering an environment where all people, including leaders, are growing and evolving together. Doing that requires three things:

Creating genuine inclusive environments where leaders allow employees and customers to influence the future.
Redefining accountability metrics for how we measure and reward high performance cultures.
Placing inclusive leadership in the center of growth — in corporate strategy and transformation.
This is not where most inclusion initiatives are placed. Most of them are viewed as cost centers — fringe activities associated with compliance, representation and reputation management — rather than profit centers that enable sustainable growth through opportunities previously unseen.
David Hain's insight:

Inclusion is a popular soundbite. But proof of it leaks in your every action - intention is not enough!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, June 1, 5:22 PM

I totally agree with David Hain, intentions are never enough, there must be activity.

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Your Company Culture Is Who You Hire, Fire, & Promote: Part 2, Anatomy of an Asshole

Your Company Culture Is Who You Hire, Fire, & Promote: Part 2, Anatomy of an Asshole | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
“Asshole” is not a term I use clinically/scientifically, but people use it commonly because it provides a shared understanding of something you “know when you see it.” So my goal here is to clearly categorize a pattern that you probably intuitively recognize, in a way that’s more insightful.

Clinically, there are three distinct types of socially aversive personalities, known as the “Dark Triad”: psychopathy, narcissism, and Machiavellianism. These traits are dimensional in a sense that all of us fall somewhere on the spectrum, but only those who are very high in the trait can be considered diagnosable with a full-blown personality disorder. If you’re curious, you can take the online Short Dark Triad personality test to see at what percentile you exhibit these three traits, compared to the general population.

The key to understanding the Dark Triad is that while all three share a callousness toward others that encourages manipulativeness, they do so for distinct reasons. Psychopaths are driven by short-term tangible rewards, and engage in reckless, antisocial behavior to get it. Machiavellians are fueled by long-term tangible rewards and will strategize schemes to get them. Narcissists are motivated by whatever boosts their ego, whether tangible rewards or simple praise that validates their idealized self-image.
David Hain's insight:

The Dark Triad of personality - or how to spot the asshole!

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Breaking Bad: Why Good People Become Evil Bosses

Breaking Bad: Why Good People Become Evil Bosses | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
So this article, Part 3, is an answer to the organizational paradox of why good people become evil bosses. Here are three archetypal stories of those who “break bad” into Machiavellianism: the hard-driving leader, the conniving executive, and the striving employee. Take a walk through the darkness with me…
David Hain's insight:

Great series on the shadow side of our personalities applied to leadership!

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Skipping On Sleep? Think Again

Skipping On Sleep? Think Again | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Can resilience be lost once acquired? The answer is a clear and resounding YES! and probably more easily than is thought.

To understand why this is so we need to examine some of the accepted fundamental characteristics of resilience which include such things as impulse control; empathy; emotional regulation; optimism; and critical thinking.

While all of these can be learnt and developed, research is now showing that our ability to do so is highly dependent upon our well-being. Moreover, as sleep underpins our well-being, the link between sleep and the resilient leader is becoming clearer.

In times of stress a leader may well choose to skip on sleep in the belief that they will get more done or be more effective in resolving issues. However this is far from reality and any productivity gains thought to be achieved from skipping sleep are quickly undone by the negative effects sleep deprivation has on the ability to access higher-level brain functions.

David Hain's insight:

Make sure you get your 8 hours - it's not just beauty sleep!

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The Elements of the Platform Organization – Stories of Platform Design

The Elements of the Platform Organization – Stories of Platform Design | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
If you want to adopt platform thinking to rethink your organization — or part of it — try to look at the existing situation and ask yourself where these elementary components are:
are there channels ready to enable simple value creation?
what are the intelligence metrics to understand how the system is performing, as a whole, in terms of learning? Is it getting better?
does the company have a culture of nurturing, mentoring, tutoring that ensure relational learning?
is the governance process ensuring the organizations can learn, adapt and evolve?
Being it a single process or the whole organization, if you want to rethink how your organizations works in the connected age, you can start from this simple model and ask these key questions.
David Hain's insight:

An introduction to platform thinking, HT Satori Lab!

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9 Signs That You're An Ambivert

9 Signs That You're An Ambivert | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
I’m sure you’ve been asked many times whether you’re an introvert or an extrovert. For some people, it’s an easy choice, but for most of us, it’s difficult to choose one way or the other.

It’s hard to choose because the introvert/extrovert dichotomy reflects a tired and outdated view of personality. Personality traits exist along a continuum, and the vast majority of us aren’t introverts or extroverts — we fall somewhere in the middle.

David Hain's insight:

Personality is not a binary choice. But we often - unhelpfully - make it seem so...

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 30, 2:41 AM

Rather than seeing personality as a binary, look at is as a continuum because we can all move between extremes when it comes to personality.

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How thinking like a magician can help you get ahead at work

How thinking like a magician can help you get ahead at work | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Getting ready to do something great isn’t always easy, but it is more important than you might realize. Smart leaders, like magicians, know there’s a science to preparation. The process of proactivity starts with envisioning the effect you ultimately want to achieve. A can’t-lose business deal, or the magical illusion that will launch your career? The more important your objective is to you, the more important it is that you load up carefully. For critical events, I actually go to such extremes of preparation that my acts sometimes fool other magicians, who can’t imagine that I’d prepare more than they do.

Consider the goals that matter most in your career and personal life, and ask yourself how you can best prepare to reach those objectives. What do you need to learn to put yourself at the top of your game? What skills will give you the greatest advantage? What could be added to your repertoire to help you jump the gap between your particular audience’s expectations and a triumphal performance?
David Hain's insight:

Leadership meets Harry Houdini - the result is a useful set of insights!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 21, 8:05 AM

I agree with this concept to a degree but I can also see where companies could try to use this to manipulate. I am all about being observant, proactive, and transparent whereas magic is often more about misdirection or diversion.

donhornsby's curator insight, May 22, 9:15 AM
Preparation is the key trick used by magicians — and it can help you conjure big wow moments, too, says David Kwong.
 
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An introduction to the laws, or principles, of the BetaCodex (part 4)

An introduction to the laws, or principles, of the BetaCodex (part 4) | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
"We are the #network with #answers for #organizations in the knowledge economy. The consequent application of our alternative mindset turns these answers into reality." Founded in early 2008, and building upon the pioneering work of the Beyond Budgeting Round Table (BBRT), this network is different: The BetaCodex Network is focused on #transforming organizations, not #talking. It is open source. It is inclusive.
This network is taking the #BetaCodex - or: #BeyondBudgeting, as it was formerly known - to a new level, by making it real.
David Hain's insight:

Command and control has been dying for years, except in crises. Here is a sound basis for it's replacement.

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 21, 7:52 AM

Good alternative, the key is getting adoption.  What do you think?

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Cognitive bias cheat sheet, simplified

Cognitive bias cheat sheet, simplified | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The 4 conundrums of the universe that lead to all biases

There are 4 qualities of the universe that limit our own intelligence and the intelligence of every other person, collective, organism, machine, alien, or imaginable god. All 200ish of our known biases are attempts to work around these conundrums!

David Hain's insight:

This is a great resource on how we can be alert to our faulty thinking tendencies!

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Inside out - a tribute to Sir John Whitmore

Inside out - a tribute to Sir John Whitmore | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
More than 30 years after they first launched modern coaching and Inner Game thinking, Tim Gallwey and John Whitmore believe the approach has more to offer now than ever before

Tim Gallwey and Sir John Whitmore, along with Laura Whitworth and Thomas Leonard, are often credited with launching modern coaching in the 1970s. They are also among the main proponents of the Inner Game approach first developed by Gallwey.

Despite its links with modern research into mindfulness and neuroscience, Inner Game thinking is still not as widely appreciated by the coaching community as it could be.

So Gallwey and Whitmore have come together once more to roll out open and corporate coaching programmes through Performance Consultants International. They believe the Inner Game, which Gallwey has evolved, still has plenty to offer.
David Hain's insight:

We lost the visionary who pioneered today's coaching industry recently. An article in his honour from Coaching at Work.

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Org Physics: How a triad of structures allows companies to absorb complexity

Org Physics: How a triad of structures allows companies to absorb complexity | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The new, emerging theory of organizations is this: Every organization has three kinds of power, and three forms of leadership, three structures. This is not a menu. There is no decision to make about having all three structures, or not. None of the three structures is optional, or nice to have. They are part of organizational physics - universal laws that apply to every organization, large or small, old or new, for profit or social.

David Hain's insight:

Very persuasive conceptualisation of leadership levers, from Nils Pflaeging.

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 19, 11:33 AM

This is a good step in understanding leadership.  I have always maintained that an organization is held together by a matrix of relationships and this address some of that concept.

Ian Berry's curator insight, May 19, 7:27 PM
Agree an excellent article. For value to be created (delivered) people must feel valued and be living values. More on these at http://blog.ianberry.biz/2017/02/for-your-best-business-results-turn.html
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Leadership: sprint, marathon & relay race

Leadership: sprint, marathon & relay race | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Research by McKinsey, Harvard, Columbia, and myriad other consultancies, think tanks and universities show that organizations with diverse leadership are 35% more likely to have better financial returns.  So, advancing women’s leadership is a vital business imperative.  And, I hope men will share with all your male colleagues why “women in leadership” is not just a women’s issue.

What’s valid for women’s leadership applies to all of us, if we can break out of long-held but untrue and unfair stereotypes about what each sex can achieve. There’s extensive research on the unconscious biases we all have about men and women so even if you believe you are an extremely progressive person, you must be vigilant and self-aware about when you might be letting these assumptions affect your judgment.
David Hain's insight:

Useful wisdom from @beCauseGlobal CEO, Nadine Hack, on how to construct a leadership frame to flex your approach to project and life circumstances.

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 19, 11:37 AM

Interesting description of Leadership in change that I agree with but I would also add that there are some change engagements that are really "IronMan" events, composed of sprints, marathons and relays so buckle up.

 

Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.