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Finding the Leader’s Heart

Finding the Leader’s Heart | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Feelings reveal and express what’s in you not what’s around you.


Via donhornsby, Roger Francis
David Hain's insight:

Heart to heart contact is where it's really at...

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donhornsby's curator insight, December 23, 2012 8:41 AM

Leaders without heart are well manicured cemeteries, pretty to look at but full of dead bones. Everything is cold technique and dead strategy apart from heart.

 

“True meaning” grows hearts. Find purpose; find heart.

Coaching Leaders
Helping leaders to develop themselves and others
Curated by David Hain
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True Leaders Believe Dissent Is an Obligation

These are head-spinning times for those of us who think about the best ways to lead and the most effective ways to compete. What defines acceptable personal behavior (let alone behavior worth emulating) among public officials? Why would executives at so many iconic organizations — Volkswagen, Wells Fargo, FIFA — tolerate behavior so egregious that it threatens the very future of their organizations? How should innovators with a fierce sense of ambition handle the criticisms and objections that inevitably come their way and make sure that confidence does not turn into bombast?

In a world hungry for great leadership, these are just a few of the questions that too many leaders seem incapable of answering. I don’t pretend to have easy answers myself. But I do know that the best leaders I’ve studied — executives and entrepreneurs who have created enduring economic value based on sound human values — recognize and embrace the “obligation to dissent.” Put simply, you can’t be an effective leader in business, politics, or society unless you encourage those around you to speak their minds, to bring attention to hypocrisy and misbehavior, and to be as direct and strong-willed in their evaluations of you as you are in your strategies and plans for them.
David Hain's insight:

Ho w much constructive dissent is there in your organisation? How well it is handled can make a big difference...

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How Rudeness Stops People from Working Together

Incivility can fracture a team, destroying collaboration, splintering members’ sense of psychological safety, and hampering team effectiveness. Belittling and demeaning comments, insults, backbiting, and other rude behavior can deflate confidence, sink trust, and erode helpfulness — even for those who aren’t the target of these behaviors.

A recent study documented how incivility diminishes collaboration and performance in medical settings. Twenty-four medical teams from four neonatal intensive care units in Israel were invited to a training workshop designed to improve quality of care. As part of the training, the teams needed to treat a premature infant whose condition suddenly deteriorated due to a serious intestinal illness (it was only a simulation; no infant’s health was endangered). Staff had to identify and diagnose the condition and administer proper treatment, including CPR. Teams were told that an expert from the United States would be watching them remotely (with video) and would occasionally comment and advise them. That “expert” was a member of the research team. Half the teams received messages from a neutral expert who spoke about the importance of training and practice using simulations but did not comment on their work quality. The other half received insulting messages about their performance and the “poor quality” of Israeli medical care.

Researchers filmed these simulations and had objective judges evaluate them. The teams exposed to rudeness displayed lower capabilities in all diagnostic and procedural performance metrics, markedly diminishing the infant’s chances of survival. This was mainly because teams exposed to rudeness didn’t share information as readily and stopped seeking help from their teammates.

David Hain's insight:

As my granny used to say, 'You catch more flies with honey than vinegar!"

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The Best-Performing CEOs in the World

This is a challenging time to be a CEO. Around the world, economies are in slow-growth mode. In nearly every region, political uncertainty undermines attempts to develop long-term plans. In the United States in particular, shareholder activists have become powerful (and vocal) critics of business leaders. These forces help explain why the C-suite sometimes appears to have a revolving door: In 2015 turnover among global CEOs reached a record rate of nearly 17%, and more than a fifth of the CEOs who left their posts over the past few years were dismissed.

Is it any wonder so many CEOs focus on the short term?

Against this bleak backdrop, it’s heartening to see a group of business leaders compiling track rec­ords that allow them to stick around and implement long-term strategies. On average, the world’s 100 best CEOs have been on the job for 17 years—and have generated a 2,091% overall return on their stock (adjusted for exchange-rate effects), or a 20.2% annual return.
David Hain's insight:

Harvard's take on the world's top CEOs.

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Can Government Be Run Like a Business? 

Can Government Be Run Like a Business?  | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Many political observers have argued for years that the federal government, with its multitrillion-dollar budget, should be run more like a business with the president acting as a de facto CEO. Enter President-elect Donald Trump, a candidate with no background in politics or public administration but decades of experience as a captain of industry. His upcoming term renews interest in the whole question. Peter Conti-Brown, a Wharton professor of legal studies in business ethics, and Philip Joyce, professor of public policy at the University of Maryland, consider the merits of his business experience as he steps into the White House.
David Hain's insight:

Thoughtful comparison between business and government, on the day that a businessman takeover at the White House.

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, January 20, 1:08 PM

While I have believed this for a long time I also know there are a number of pitfalls in trying to do so.  We will find out over the next 4 years.

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Secret Ingredient for Success

Secret Ingredient for Success | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

During the 1970s, Chris Argyris, a business theorist at Harvard Business School (and now, at 89, a professor emeritus) began to research what happens to organizations and people, like Mr. Chang, when they find obstacles in their paths.

Professor Argyris called the most common response single loop learning — an insular mental process in which we consider possible external or technical reasons for obstacles.

Less common but vastly more effective is the cognitive approach that Professor Argyris called double-loop learning. In this mode we  question every aspect of our approach, including our methodology, biases and deeply held assumptions. This more psychologically nuanced self-examination requires that we honestly challenge our beliefs and summon the courage to act on that information, which may lead to fresh ways of thinking about our lives and our goals.

In interviews we did with high achievers for a book, we expected to hear that talent, persistence, dedication and luck played crucial roles in their success. Surprisingly, however, self-awareness played an equally strong role.

The successful people we spoke with — in business, entertainment, sports and the arts — all had similar responses when faced with obstacles: they subjected themselves to fairly merciless self-examination that prompted reinvention of their goals and the methods by which they endeavored to achieve them.

David Hain's insight:

Look deep into that mirror in front of you - and reframe or reinvent what you don't like!

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Steve Bax's curator insight, January 20, 3:12 AM
Self awareness is very important for achieving success. 
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Leadership Lessons from a Near-Fatal Car Accident

Leadership Lessons from a Near-Fatal Car Accident | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
If you ever run into me on an occasion where I happen to be wearing business attire, you might notice that I’m donning suspenders instead of a belt.  Some people may think I’m wearing suspenders to look more corporate, or to embody a more sage “leadership adviser” persona – but the truth is, the suspenders are not my first choice. Several years ago, a life-changing event caused me to trade in my belts for suspenders. I have no complaints, however; I’m grateful for the suspenders. Not only do they provide much-needed assistance, they are also a constant reminder of the most harrowing experience of my life – an experience that affirmed for me two “uplifting” lessons about leadership.
David Hain's insight:

"I'm here, how can I help?" Powerful leadership lessons form Doug Conant!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, January 19, 12:40 PM

Excellent insights.

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A Rant Against Maximization – Signal v. Noise

A Rant Against Maximization – Signal v. Noise | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
I can’t imagine anything less interesting in business than maximizing shareholder value. Yet this is what public companies are pressured — if not legally required — to do. A lot of non-public companies follow the same path towards performance and results.
To take it further, maximization as a concept just isn’t interesting to me. I don’t care about maximization. Not maximization of profit, revenue, people, reach, productivity, etc. Not interesting.
I feel like this makes me an outcast in the business world. Part of the minority, the ones who simply “don’t get how it works”.
David Hain's insight:

Jason Fried's rant has much to commend it. It could improve the world...

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Flat hierarchies: Just another step in the wrong direction

Flat hierarchies: Just another step in the wrong direction | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Most managers and business leaders aim to make their organizations flatter. They try to reduce middle management, to skim the amount of hierarchical layers, or they scrap internal bureaucracy in order to achieve more efficiency, more effectiveness, and more enterprise agility. The problem with this is simple, but important: Organizations should actually not be flat, but decentralized. Why? Because flat means continuing to bark up the wrong tree: In flat, the steering from the top remains.

Hierarchical steering in organizations once was a pretty good idea. That was during the industrial age. Since this era ended in the 1970s or so, the ability of markets to surprise us has increased significantly: Value creation in the knowledge age is more dynamic and more prone to surprise than it was in the industrial age. The importance of services, customization, individualized production, uncertainty and highly competitive markets has risen dramatically. That means: in every organization, the outside has to be in charge, top-down has turned into a trap.
David Hain's insight:

When was the last time you looked at the implications of your organisation design?

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, January 18, 6:02 PM

What do you think? I am a fan of flatter organizations but it is not a one size fits all.  Networks are part of either structure.

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Four Questions To Turn Everyone In Your Company Into A Futurist

Four Questions To Turn Everyone In Your Company Into A Futurist | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Most of us aren't futurists, and futurists aren't oracles. They simply try and make some sense of what's coming—not hard and fast predictions, just possibilities. The most accurate forecasts we're able to make are often necessarily broad. What's always clear is simply that technology will only burrow deeper into our world and organizations, disrupting the way we do things and throwing more threats and opportunities in our way. How it will is more of an open question by comparison.

Still, there are a few ways companies can get better at predicting not just what changes may be around the corner, but how they'll affect them once those disruptions arrive. Making everyone in your company more effective futurists all starts with asking the right questions. Here are a few of them.
David Hain's insight:

Sense making - arguably the key job of a CEO - some helpful advice here!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, January 18, 6:04 PM

Questions drive the ability of leaders to understand and empower people.

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How to Fight Stress with Empathy

How to Fight Stress with Empathy | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The Center for Disease Control found that 66 percent of American workers say they lie awake at night troubled by the physical or emotional effects of stress, and stress has been linked to many health problems, including obesity and heart disease—especially among low-income Americans. Stress not only affects us, but it can impact those around us, too, especially our children.
Not all stress is bad, of course. Stress can also be invigorating or lead us to care about the welfare of others, if channeled in the right way. Nor is it always avoidable—many of us have lives with stressors beyond our personal control. But, psychologists have identified key variable that determine whether stress ultimately affects us positively or negatively:
Our perception of stress
The meaning we attach to it
Our ability to cope with uncertainty and ambiguity
The degree of control we have over the circumstances that produce the stress
In my experience, many people don’t recognize the role that their own perceptions, fueled by biases, play in exacerbating stress. By becoming more aware of our biases in perception, we can learn to focus on the truthful assessment of situations we encounter without distorting reality, thereby remaining calm, energetic, creative, and resilient when faced with highly stressful situations.
David Hain's insight:

Stressed? Over-stressed, over-long? try being more empathetic and opening yourself to others empathy!

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The Essential Skill of Pattern Recognition 

The Essential Skill of Pattern Recognition  | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The way we want to make sense of the world around us often has to do with causality. The question we ask is what caused “something” to happen. There is a variable, the “it,” that happened, that is now to be explained. In scientific study this variable is regarded as dependent. An independent variable, or variables, that cause it are then sought. This is also the if-then model of management. In organizations, a familiar explanation for success is that a particular manager or a particular culture caused it. But scholars are increasingly pointing out the fact that this view of the relationship between cause and effect is much too simplistic and leads to a limited or even faulty understanding of what was really going on.
What emerges is, paradoxically, predictable and unpredictable, knowable and unknowable at the same time. This does not mean dismissing planning, or management, as pointless, but means that the future always contains surprises that no one can control.
David Hain's insight:

The ability to spot patterns as they emerge is so important to leaders in theVUCA world we live in!

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An executive’s guide to machine learning | McKinsey & Company

An executive’s guide to machine learning | McKinsey & Company | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
machine learning is nothing like learning in the human sense (yet). But what it already does extraordinarily well—and will get better at—is relentlessly chewing through any amount of data and every combination of variables. Because machine learning’s emergence as a mainstream management tool is relatively recent, it often raises questions. In this article, we’ve posed some that we often hear and answered them in a way we hope will be useful for any executive. Now is the time to grapple with these issues, because the competitive significance of business models turbocharged by machine learning is poised to surge. Indeed, management author Ram Charan suggests that “any organization that is not a math house now or is unable to become one soon is already a legacy company.2
David Hain's insight:

Coming, ready or not! Some thoughts on getting robot-ready!

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Self-Refinement Through the Wisdom of the Ages: New Year’s Resolutions from Some of Humanity’s Greatest Minds

Self-Refinement Through the Wisdom of the Ages: New Year’s Resolutions from Some of Humanity’s Greatest Minds | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
At the outset of each new year, humanity sets out to better itself as we resolve to eradicate our unhealthy habits and cultivate healthy ones. But while the most typical New Year’s resolutions tend to be about bodily health, the most meaningful ones aim at a deeper kind of health through the refinement of our mental, spiritual, and emotional habits — which often dictate our physical ones. In a testament to young Susan Sontag’s belief that rereading is an act of rebirth, I have revisited the timelessly rewarding ideas of great thinkers from the past two millennia to cull fifteen such higher-order resolutions for personal refinement.
David Hain's insight:

Some deeper New Year resolutions from significant human beings!

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Daniel Tremblay's curator insight, January 10, 4:28 PM
Un long article - matières à réflexion ...
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A Harvard psychologist says people judge you based on 2 criteria when they first meet you

A Harvard psychologist says people judge you based on 2 criteria when they first meet you | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
People size you up in seconds, but what exactly are they evaluating?

Harvard Business School professor Amy Cuddy has been studying first impressions alongside fellow psychologists Susan Fiske and Peter Glick for more than 15 years, and has discovered patterns in these interactions.

In her new book, "Presence," Cuddy says that people quickly answer two questions when they first meet you:

Can I trust this person?
Can I respect this person?
Psychologists refer to these dimensions as warmth and competence, respectively, and ideally you want to be perceived as having both.

Interestingly, Cuddy says that most people, especially in a professional context, believe that competence is the more important factor. After all, they want to prove that they are smart and talented enough to handle your business.

But in fact, warmth, or trustworthiness, is the most important factor in how people evaluate you.

"From an evolutionary perspective," Cuddy says, "it is more crucial to our survival to know whether a person deserves our trust."
David Hain's insight:

More evidence that trust is the critical currency in success!

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Trust: is it Earned or Assumed?

Trust: is it Earned or Assumed? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
I contend that trust can not be earned, but it can be lost (i.e., we can lose sight of trust). More precisely, our relationship with trust can be diminished or obscured. For the time being, please at least entertain the idea that trust is always within us; trust is within us, between us and all around us.

Trust is a critically-important aspect of all of our relationships. It also has sacred overtones (i.e., do we trust God or the Universe?). It is because of trust's sacred nature that to think of it as something we can 'earn' (like money) does a disservice to trust itself and to our relationships.

To think of trust as something we can earn by focusing just on our external relationships, by focusing just on 'earning' it, is too simplistic of a story. Trust starts within oneself, and then envelopes our interpersonal and inter-company relationships. This trust is tied to our identity and dependent on our relationship with the Universe (i.e., God, Higher Power). If we just focus on our external relationships, and not our internal relationship with ourselves, we will lack authenticity and integrity.
David Hain's insight:

A deep dive into trust!

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Five leadership priorities for 2017

Five leadership priorities for 2017 | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
As the past year has demonstrated, leaders must be responsive to the demands of the people who have entrusted them to lead, while also providing a vision and a way forward, so that people can imagine a better future.

True leadership in a complex, uncertain, and anxious world requires leaders to navigate with both a radar system and a compass. They must be receptive to signals that are constantly arriving from an ever-changing landscape, and they should be willing to make necessary adjustments; but they must never deviate from their true north, which is to say, a strong vision based on authentic values.

That is why the World Economic Forum has made Responsive and Responsible Leadership the theme for our annual January meeting in Davos. As leaders in government, business, and civil society chart a course for the next year, five key challenges will warrant their attention.
David Hain's insight:

2017 will be a year of big leadership challenges - are we up to them?

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Technology is changing the way we live, learn and work. How can leaders make sure we all prosper?

Technology is changing the way we live, learn and work. How can leaders make sure we all prosper? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The future is not pre-ordained by machines. It’s created by humans. Technology is a tool. We can use it in many different ways. How do we use technology in ways that will create not just prosperity, but shared prosperity? How do we make choices that will work for people earning low and middle incomes?
David Hain's insight:

The future may depend on getting these challenges right...

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, January 8, 11:21 AM

Food for thought.  Thanks for sharing David Hain.

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Four principles for leadership in an uncertain world

Four principles for leadership in an uncertain world | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Mark Twain is reputed to have said: “History does not repeat itself, but it does rhyme.” It remains sage advice about the nature of international relations: we have a poor track record of preventing global mishaps, yet their causes often appear obvious upon reflection. Yet hindsight is arguably the most troublesome of cognitive biases that affect our decision-making, particularly when facing rising uncertainty about the future. A leader’s interpretation of a recent failure inevitably will shape his or her future strategy — this is why, for example, there is so much anxiety as to what the US will do in Syria and Iraq during the Trump administration. In studying aviation disasters, Dekker observed that most reactions to past failures share the following four common characteristics
David Hain's insight:

Too many managers treat adaptive problems (no solution, iterative) with technical answers based on limited and partial analysis! Good read!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, January 8, 11:25 AM

Some great thoughts here.  

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How to Use Neuroscience to Frame Your Company’s Response to the Election

How to Use Neuroscience to Frame Your Company’s Response to the Election | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Business leaders have a choice during the next few months in the way they speak publicly about political affairs. The Brexit referendum, the U.S. presidential election, and the growing support for nationalism in many countries have all made it impossible to ignore politics — because every aspect of major businesses is affected by globalization. Top business leaders are reacting to these developments in a variety of ways: They are intrigued by the business opportunities or the presumed reduction in taxes; concerned about the impact on diversity; uncertain about the effect this will have on their access to global markets; disheartened or pleased personally. No matter what their perspective, they may be inclined to share their views openly or they may be tempted to remain silent. Either choice could make things better or worse within their companies. It all depends on how they do it, and how well they understand the personal responses triggered by these political events at levels below explicit consciousness.

David Hain's insight:

How to handle Brexit/Trump? Acknowledge problems with marginalised people, encourage conversations and reset a focus on common goals and values.

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Managing a Person With a Victim Mentality: Dealing With Team Members Who Won't Take Responsibility

Managing a Person With a Victim Mentality: Dealing With Team Members Who Won't Take Responsibility | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
People with a victim mentality blame others for their misfortune. Look for positive solutions to their problems, but don't let them excuse poor performance.

Via Roger Francis, Ricard Lloria, Richard Andrews
David Hain's insight:

All who manage people will meet victims. Useful ideas on how to deal with them!

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The 10 Best And Worst Moments In Leadership 2016?

The 10 Best And Worst Moments In Leadership 2016? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
This has been anything but a normal year. One of the strangest U.S. elections in history has finally ended, and businesses have come and gone. Throughout the year, a few people and organizations have stood out as leadership beacons, showing the world the best way to accomplish things. Conversely, others have shown themselves to be less-than-stellar leaders and role models.

We've looked back at the last year and all the crazy events that have happened. With that, here's our rundown of the best and worst moments in leadership.
David Hain's insight:

Epic leadership fails in 2016, plus some more successful leaders!

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Understanding the Hero’s Journey – Part 1 | ALCN

Understanding the Hero’s Journey – Part 1 | ALCN | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
I have had the good fortune of working with leaders in organizations around the world for almost two decades. Some are at the helm of small or medium sized businesses while others are at the wheel of massive Fortune 500 corporations. While their job roles might be slightly different, the journey they take from the onset of their calling as leaders and beyond is often very similar. This is the what Campbell describes as the Hero’s Journey.

It is crucial for executive coaches to understand this journey and how it impacts leaders. It is our job to guide the leader through this journey and help them to embrace the various stages. The leaders who truly walk through this experience with eyes and heart wide open come to the other side with a richer understanding of their role as both leaders and people. It is an experience that often impacts every fiber of who they are as people. With that in mind, here are some of stages that you might encounter as part of a leader’s “Hero’s Journey.”

David Hain's insight:

Very useful way of framing a life story - what's your hero's journey?

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The Neuroscience of Trust

So it’s clear that creating an employee-centric culture can be good for business. But how do you do that effectively? Culture is typically designed in an ad hoc way around random perks like gourmet meals or “karaoke Fridays,” often in thrall to some psychological fad. And despite the evidence that you can’t buy higher job satisfaction, organizations still use golden handcuffs to keep good employees in place. While such efforts might boost workplace happiness in the short term, they fail to have any lasting effect on talent retention or performance.

In my research I’ve found that building a culture of trust is what makes a meaningful difference. Employees in high-trust organizations are more productive, have more energy at work, collaborate better with their colleagues, and stay with their employers longer than people working at low-trust companies. They also suffer less chronic stress and are happier with their lives, and these factors fuel stronger performance.

Leaders understand the stakes—at least in principle. In its 2016 global CEO survey, PwC reported that 55% of CEOs think that a lack of trust is a threat to their organization’s growth. But most have done little to increase trust, mainly because they aren’t sure where to start. In this article I provide a science-based framework that will help them.
David Hain's insight:

Make 2017 the Year of Trust! You know it makes sense in all sorts of ways - some detailed here.

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9 Highly Compelling Leadership Links

9 Highly Compelling Leadership Links | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
In our final Leadership That Works Newsletter of the year: a collection of thought-provoking posts to inspire you to lead and live with more fulfillment and greater impact in 2017.
David Hain's insight:

Great reads suggested by the excellent ConantLeadership!

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Remedies for Your Anxious Mind?

Remedies for Your Anxious Mind? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
On a bad day—and those can come one after another—every little thing can drive us to distraction. We’re itchy, antsy, pulling our hair out, too jumpy to even meditate. Next time your brain gets knotted up, consider these suggestions.
David Hain's insight:

Mindfulness techniques - not even close to rocket science, but they can help if we embrace them!

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Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.