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Finding the Leader’s Heart

Finding the Leader’s Heart | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Feelings reveal and express what’s in you not what’s around you.


Via donhornsby, Roger Francis
David Hain's insight:

Heart to heart contact is where it's really at...

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donhornsby's curator insight, December 23, 2012 8:41 AM

Leaders without heart are well manicured cemeteries, pretty to look at but full of dead bones. Everything is cold technique and dead strategy apart from heart.

 

“True meaning” grows hearts. Find purpose; find heart.

Coaching Leaders
Helping leaders to develop themselves and others
Curated by David Hain
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Org Physics: How a triad of structures allows companies to absorb complexity

Org Physics: How a triad of structures allows companies to absorb complexity | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Within the three structures of organizations, thee three kinds of leadership reside. All important, but dramatically out of balance in most organizations we know:

Compliance Leadership - emerging from Formal Structure.
Social Leadership - emerging from Informal Structure.
Value Creation Leadership - emerging from Value Creation Structure.

Following this thought, there is not "leadership". But "leaderships". Just like the three structures they emerge from, these types of leadership are interdependent and complex, not independent or linear. In the presence of too much hierarchy, or formal power, the two other kinds of leadership are actually quite impossible to happen: Social density and connection will deteriorate. Members of the organization will find it harder to get the work done, while they game fhe formal structure and its complicated mechanics of steering and control. Organizational energy is wasted on bureaucracy (Formal Structure), and self-defence against command-and-control from the top, carried out within Informal Structure.

David Hain's insight:

Some very useful, challenging and practical leadership thinkings, as always,from Nils Pflaeging!

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Is Corporate Short-Termism Really a Problem? The Jury’s Still Out

McKinsey has a new empirical study that provides evidence in favor of the view that corporations should take longer views. It has a reasonable methodology. It divides the sample between companies that take a long-term view and those that do not, and then compares their performance. It finds that companies that take a long-term view perform better on many metrics, such as employment growth and shareholder return.

Its findings deserve much discussion, debate, and attempts at replication. At this point, though, I would give a Scottish verdict of “not proven” to their case. They may be right, but I do not think they have provided evidence that would convince anyone other than a prior believer.

David Hain's insight:

I'm with McKinsey here - particularly in public sector settings!

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Don't Be Afraid To Call Yourself A Neo-Generalist

Don't Be Afraid To Call Yourself A Neo-Generalist | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
As I approach problems at work or in life—as I tackle projects or ideate on new concepts—I realized I am tapping into a diverse background of personal and professional experiences, ultimately surfacing an answer, a thought, or a possibility by virtue of looking at things specifically and generally. I am like the capital letter T. Along the top of the T is my breadth and along the stem of the T is my depth. As necessary, I shift along the top of the stem to accommodate a given situation.

The authors describe it differently, and perhaps more astutely, by virtue of what they describe as “The Infinite Loop” found below.
David Hain's insight:

Is your knowledge deep? Wide? Or a combination of both? And do you value both in colleagues?

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Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, February 23, 2:07 PM
Don't Be Afraid To Call Yourself A Neo-Generalist
 
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10 Principles of Strategy through Execution

10 Principles of Strategy through Execution | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
“We are all in the gutter,” wrote Oscar Wilde, “but some of us are looking at the stars.” That is the nature of strategy through execution. You operate deep in the weeds, managing countless day-to-day tasks and transactions. At the same time, you keep a steady gaze on your company’s long-term goals — and on ways you can stand out from your competitors.

Having a close link between strategy and execution is critically important. Your strategy is your promise to deliver value: the things you do for customers, now and in the future, that no other company can do as well. Your execution occurs in the thousands of decisions made each day by people at every level of your company.
David Hain's insight:

Some good principles that can connect thinkers with doers to make things happen!

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The Neuroscience in Building High Performance Trust Cultures

The Neuroscience in Building High Performance Trust Cultures | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Numerous management books, articles and conferences have focused on the topic of trust. Trust is claimed to be some near-magical economic elixir explaining everything from productivity gains to enhanced happiness at work. But in reality trust is complicated and challenging to measure at an individual, team and organizational level. Fortunately, discoveries in neuroscience have provided new, rigorous, peer-reviewed and actionable insights into what trust is, how it can be measured and, most important, how organizations can build and enhance trust to improve their performance.
David Hain's insight:

Excellent science based summary of why trust is such a critical currency!

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Accountability and the Perils of the Blame Game - People Development

Accountability and the Perils of the Blame Game - People Development | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Accountability has its place. There is no doubt about that. But we would do well to recognise that it means precious little if we decline to use it as a tool for improvement and instead employ it only as a weapon for heaping fresh misery on those who “called it wrong”.

David Hain's insight:

Imagine a 'forgiveness culture". No? well, we find it easy enough to recognise a blame culture...

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Steve Bax's curator insight, February 17, 4:22 AM
Thought provoking piece by  Martin Binks , former dean of Nottingham University Business School , here. He gives two examples which illustrate the dangers of blame and the alternative well.
Steve Bax's curator insight, February 17, 4:23 AM
Thought provoking piece by Martin Binks , former dean of Nottingham University Business School , here. He gives two examples which illustrate the dangers of blame and the alternative well.
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This is how you should think about culture if you want to be ready for the future of work

This is how you should think about culture if you want to be ready for the future of work | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
It all sounds rather wonderful, doesn't it? Pick a scientifically designed culture that's been empirically proven to work by management researchers and consultants (Peters, Waterman, Deal and Kennedy researched over a hundred organisations - since augmented by thousands more case studies), implement it, and watch your company blossom before your eyes.

There's only one teeny-weeny problem. From an anthropological and sociological perspective (you know, the social sciences that actually research culture and society), the idea of a designed culture is absurd.
David Hain's insight:

The importance of deviance and difference in a healthy culture. Forget the identikit cloning!

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Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, February 21, 12:38 PM
This is how you should think about culture if you want to be ready for the future of work
 
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A leaner public sector | McKinsey & Company

A leaner public sector | McKinsey & Company | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Neglecting the “soft” side of lean—which includes steps that enable leaders to drive continuous improvement and change the way employees think and work—can delay or even derail an operational transformation. Organizations can reap larger and more sustainable benefits by taking an approach that balances a lean program’s hard and soft elements (exhibit). Agencies must properly embed the softer aspects of lean by implementing the appropriate management infrastructure and by focusing on changing employees’ mind-sets and capabilities.

David Hain's insight:

A useful encapsulation of the challenges of culture change - in this case towards lean, but could be any new operating system. The soft stuff is the hard stuff!

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A Cascade of Sand: Complex Systems in a Complex Time

A Cascade of Sand: Complex Systems in a Complex Time | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
o treat complex phenomena as if they were simple, to pretend that you could hold the unknowable in the cleverly crafted structure of your ideas —he could think of nothing that was more dangerous. “There is much reason,” Hayek said, “to be apprehensive about the long-run dangers created in a much wider field by the uncritical acceptance of assertions which have the appearance of being scientific.”

Concluding his Nobel speech, Hayek warned, “If man is not to do more harm than good in his efforts to improve the social order, he will have to learn that in this, as in all other fields where essential complexity of an organized kind prevails, he cannot acquire the full knowledge which would make mastery of the events possible.” Politicians and thinkers would be wise not to try to bend history as “the craftsman shapes his handiwork, but rather to cultivate growth by providing the appropriate environment, in the manner a gardener does for his plants.”
David Hain's insight:

VUCA world rewards gardeners more than craftsmen because of its emergent nature. Big implications for leaders!

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39 Book Recommendations From Billionaire Charlie Munger that Will Make you Smarter

39 Book Recommendations From Billionaire Charlie Munger that Will Make you Smarter | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
That quote kickstarted my own reading habits and helps me regularly read over 100 books a year.
Charlie Munger is the billionaire business partner of Warren Buffett and the Vice Chairman at Berkshire Hathaway, one of the largest companies in the world. He’s also one of the smartest people on the planet — his lecture on the psychology of human misjudgment is the best 45 minutes you might spend this year.
Over the years Munger’s compiled a list of book recommendations that has served me well. A lot of these books will help you become more valuable by seeing the world for what it really is and gaining unique ideas and insights.
David Hain's insight:

For the readers amongst us - a pretty good list to be going on with!

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Are Great Men and Women a Product of Circumstance?

Are Great Men and Women a Product of Circumstance? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Greatness is in many of us, but only if we rise, with practical expediency, to the demands of life. Greatness arises only when tested.
David Hain's insight:

Some people seek out tests, others dread them. Either way, they can be the making of us. Food for thought...?

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Five things I learned from Davos 2017 – World Economic Forum 

Five things I learned from Davos 2017 – World Economic Forum  | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The mood at Davos was the most divergent it has been in years. Some American bosses were notably bullish about accelerating economic growth and a regime change in fiscal, regulatory and trade policies. Others, particularly some European policy makers, were markedly downbeat. But whoever you spoke with, the intense political and economic challenges from populism, globalization, disruptive technology, the migration crisis and inequality dominated debates. While consensus was less confident on how to navigate the risks, it likely acts as a catalyst to drive change.
Conversation was dominated not only by who was there, but by who was not. President Trump was the dark matter of Davos. Dark matter is not well understood but occupies 95% of the universe and has huge gravitational pull. The implications of Trump’s presidency reverberated around Davos.
David Hain's insight:

Useful summary of big trends occupying policy people in 2017.

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7 leadership traits of successful CIOs

7 leadership traits of successful CIOs | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The California Psychology Inventory (CPI), developed by CPP -- the exclusive publisher of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator assessment -- is an assessment tool that help leaders gain more insight into and improve their performance. Ultimately, the CPI helps identify your leadership strengths and weaknesses, what motivates you and can help you understand your personal "thinking style."

This year, the CPP released the seven key traits CIOs need in order to be successful leaders. These are the key traits most commonly associated with CIOs who have taken the assessment test. According to Sherrie Haynie, an organizational development consultant and personality expert with CPP, these traits are set to become increasingly important as cloud infrastructure pushes these leaders to become "agents of change." Businesses will need strong CIO leadership to smoothly navigate such a transitional time in technology -- and a good place to start is to find someone who has these seven leadership traits.
David Hain's insight:

Nothing new here - but the same traits keep coming up, so a handy self/360 audit framework.

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, February 11, 4:59 PM

What do you think?

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10 Heart-Based Questions that Produce the Very Best Decisions

10 Heart-Based Questions that Produce the Very Best Decisions | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
10 heart-based questions:

Use applicable decision making models. But before pulling the trigger on decisions, ask 10 character/heart based questions.

What does courage/confidence tell you to do?
What does humility tell you to do?
What does integrity/honesty/openness tell you to do?
What does flexibility/agility tell you to do?
What does perseverance tell you to do?
What does compassion/kindness tell you to do?
What does decisiveness tell you to do?
What does respect for others tell you to do?
What does passion tell you to do?
What does seeking the best interests of others tell you to do?
David Hain's insight:

Brilliant 2-minute wisdom on making good decisions from Dan Rockwell, @Leadershipfreak!

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The Year Of No-Buzzword Leadership

The Year Of No-Buzzword Leadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Stanford Graduate School of Business professor, Jeffrey Pfeffer,  feels workplaces are dysfunctional despite the billions spent on leadership development. He argues the reason is that leadership recommendations are not based on the real world but rather an ideal world. And that to be effective, leaders need to be true to a situation and what people around them need and want.

This begot my 2017 focus: a year of no-buzzword leadership. I want to make sure that my leadership guidance continues to achieve specific real-world goals and is straight-shooting, and, most importantly, actionable. And it’s my hope that others want to join the cause and ditch buzzword leadership this year and forever.

David Hain's insight:

I accept the challenge, but I suspect it will be difficult...

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Why Some People Get Burned Out and Others Don’t

People do all kinds of destructive things to deal with stress—they overeat, abuse drugs and alcohol, and push harder rather than slowing down. What we learned from our study of chief medical officers is that people can leverage their emotional intelligence to deal with stress and ward off burnout. You, too, might want to try the following:
David Hain's insight:

Reframe your perspective to deal with stress more effectively!

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donhornsby's curator insight, February 7, 9:28 AM
By using and developing your emotional intelligence, you can put a stop to burnout—for you, and for others. Remember, though: improving EI takes time and effort. Be patient with yourself, as well as forgiving and kind. The last thing you want to do is to make improving your EI another source of stress.
 
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HOW TO (and should we) NEGOTIATE WITH FAIRNESS

HOW TO (and should we) NEGOTIATE WITH FAIRNESS | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
When faced with a negotiation, do you want more than what is fair? Many people will certainly say or think “yes, of course we want more than what is fair.” In fact, often negotiators will perceive a more than fair outcome in their favor as a successful negotiation. This may be true in a game of haggling over an item in a flea market for example, but is it an appropriate negotiation strategy in a sophisticated business setting?

In the early 1930s, Princeton University offered Albert Einstein a position at the Princeton Institute of Advanced Studies. As they were negotiating salary, Einstein suggested an annual salary of $3,000, a livable salary for those days, but perhaps not commensurate with a man of Einstein’s stature. Princeton insisted on paying him a salary of $15,000 per year, five times his initial offer, which Einstein accepted.

In this case, had Princeton accepted Einstein’s initial offer, they would certainly have gotten more than what was fair. Why then did they insist on a deal that was fair?

When we are engaged in business negotiations, we are negotiating not only the overt issues such as salary, price, terms and conditions, but also the tacit issue of how we will work together moving forward. It is imperative that we achieve an optimal outcome both on the overt substantive issues as well as the tacit issue of our working relationship.
David Hain's insight:

We have to negotiate through life - no exceptions. So best think about how to get win:win - the only sustainable position!

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Arianna Huffington on the link between leadership and well-being

Arianna Huffington on the link between leadership and well-being | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Stress and burnout are on the rise, as leaders and employees alike struggle to keep up with the relentless pace of business. But there’s another way. Arianna Huffington, founder of the Huffington Post, has turned to tackle work-life issues with Thrive Global, a media platform that seeks to improve both well-being and performance. In this interview with McKinsey’s Rik Kirkland, Huffington discusses how to disconnect from technology to reconnect with ourselves, as well as why supportive policies might help companies get ahead. An edited version of her remarks follows.
David Hain's insight:

I hope Arianna Huffington's name lends this campaign legs!

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Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, February 23, 2:12 PM
Arianna Huffington on the link between leadership and well-being
 
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10 Dumb Rules That Make Your Best People Want to Quit

10 Dumb Rules That Make Your Best People Want to Quit | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Too many workplaces create rule-driven cultures that may keep management feeling like things are under control, but they squelch creativity and reinforce the ordinary.
The more rules, the less passion — which means less motivation.
The more rules, the less excitement — which means less powerful performance.
The more rules, the less enthusiasm — which means lower profits.
Faced with a rule-driven culture, the best employees — the most talented and hard working — are usually the first to go, because they’re in high demand and have more opportunity than most.
What’s left is a pool of people who are mediocre at what they do, willing to compromise their standards, and in it mostly for the paycheck.
And if you have mediocre people doing mediocre work, you are going to have a mediocre company.
David Hain's insight:

Are the rules in your organisation working in favour of developing capability? Or are they driving some of the best away?

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Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, February 22, 5:38 AM
10 Dumb Rules That Make Your Best People Want to Quit
 
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The dark side of transparency | McKinsey & Company

The dark side of transparency | McKinsey & Company | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
It’s possible in a digital age to track activities in real time and to share information widely at almost zero cost (in theory, at least, improving decision making). But, in many cases, the innovations that have brought this about have reduced effectiveness, thanks to an emerging “accountability gap” where information is in the hands of people who may not use it wisely.

Executives may therefore need to become smarter about when to open up and when to withhold information. This article looks at three main areas where too much transparency creates problems and offers some guidance on how to get the balance right.
David Hain's insight:

Like most good stuff, transparency has risks too. Approach it thoughtfully...

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Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, February 23, 2:13 PM
The dark side of transparency | McKinsey & Company
 
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Leadership: The Power Of Stories And The Problem Of False Narratives

Leadership: The Power Of Stories And The Problem Of False Narratives | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Former CEO of Herman Miller, Max De Pree, once said, "The first responsibility of a leader is to define reality." 

In my decades of training and coaching, I have helped many leaders harness storytelling to bring about success. In his observation that good leaders “define reality,” Max De Pree’s important insight is that reality does not define itself. Experienced leaders recognize that truths obvious to them may not be widely understood throughout their organizations. Reality requires interpretation, and narrative work animates that effort.

Every organizational culture contains diverse narratives that compete for dominance and credence in its stories. Our latest presidential election offers a dramatic illustration. The competing narratives on the right and left were not merely different, they were incommensurate, rejecting each other’s basic premises, straining shared meaning to the breaking point. Effective leaders develop consensus for stories that motivate and inspire while remaining grounded in reality. For your own story, or that of your organization, here's what to keep in mind to keep it grounded in reality
David Hain's insight:

Sensemaking is a leader's first task, but it needs thinking about because it is easy to connect people to the wrong narrative...

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Seven steps to better brainstorming 

Seven steps to better brainstorming  | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Most attempts at brainstorming are doomed. To generate better ideas--and boost the odds that your organization will act on them--start by asking better questions.
David Hain's insight:

'Think outside the box" doesn't cut it! But brainstorming can really change things up if done effectively...

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Sparking creativity in teams: An executive’s guide 

Sparking creativity in teams: An executive’s guide  | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Although creativity is often considered a trait of the privileged few, any individual or team can become more creative—better able to generate the breakthroughs that stimulate growth and performance. In fact, our experience with hundreds of corporate teams, ranging from experienced C-level executives to entry-level customer service reps, suggests that companies can use relatively simple techniques to boost the creative output of employees at any level.

The key is to focus on perception, which leading neuroscientists, such as Emory University’s Gregory Berns, find is intrinsically linked to creativity in the human brain. To perceive things differently, Berns maintains, we must bombard our brains with things it has never encountered. This kind of novelty is vital because the brain has evolved for efficiency and routinely takes perceptual shortcuts to save energy; perceiving information in the usual way requires little of it. Only by forcing our brains to recategorize information and move beyond our habitual thinking patterns can we begin to imagine truly novel alternatives.
David Hain's insight:

Some useful ideas for getting people out of habits that have become staid patterns!

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The Startup Idea Matrix – The Mission – Medium

Think of this less as a map and more as a starting point for creativity. It probably won’t give you the next billion dollar idea, but might spark a line of thinking that brings you to one.
David Hain's insight:

If you are a would be entrepreneur, a little structure may help you think though in what way you might scratch the itch...

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7 Strategies That Will Help You Eliminate Procrastination

There is a high chance that you might be procrastinating on something important while reading this article, (which is a bit paradoxical, but bare with me).
This is good. Here you will learn simple strategies which you can use from this moment on to eliminate procrastination and get results.
Procrastination can appear because of a variety of reasons:
Fear of Success
Fear of Failure
Fear of Judgment
Fear of the Unknown
Perfectionism and Micromanaging
Over Planning
The Unrealistic Expectations
Low Self-Esteem
Lack of Purpose and Direction
David Hain's insight:

Always worth thinking about new ways of dealing with what you are putting off...

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, February 2, 12:08 PM

Some good insights on procrastination worth looking at.

Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.