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In decision-making, trust your gut IF you're an expert in the relevant subject area

In decision-making, trust your gut IF you're an expert in the relevant subject area | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Trust your gut -- as long as you're an expert. So says a new study. How expert someone is within a particular domain has a positive impact on their ability to make an accurate gut decision," said Rice's Erik Dane, lead author of a study published last month in the journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. However, he added, "Even if you're an expert, intuitive decision-making is better for some types of tasks than others. Tasks that can be solved through predetermined steps, like math problems, are not as conducive to intuitive decision-making as less-structured tasks, which may include certain strategic or human resource management problems."
Via Gina Stepp, donhornsby, Anne Egros
David Hain's insight:

Nice take on decision making - but making a decision and learning from it right or wrong strikes me as the key thing.

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Gina Stepp's curator insight, December 16, 2012 2:04 AM

This relates to the fact that the more you practice  something, the more it becomes part of your automatic reference. Don't trust your gut if you haven't educated your gut.

donhornsby's curator insight, December 16, 2012 7:39 AM

(From the article): "Once again, the researchers found that intuition was more effective for those with high expertise. In the intuition condition, participants with high expertise demonstrated higher task performance. In the analysis condition, those with high expertise performed no better than those with low expertise."

Anne Egros's curator insight, December 16, 2012 2:39 PM

Sometimes some decisions are made with no logic nor intuition but just by luck. If your decision was right you can always say it was intuition while in fact is is like playing red or black at the roulette each time you have 50% chances to win.

 

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Gospels of Failure - 'Compulsory' reading for CXOs?

Gospels of Failure - 'Compulsory' reading for CXOs? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Here's a riddle. What is the only business book ever to spend more than 19 weeks on the New York Times best-seller list, sell more than a million copies, and be nominated for the prestigious National Book Award?

Give up? It's The 9/11 Commission Report, which is shaping up to become the surprise hit of the last year. It's a trick question, granted: The 9/11 study isn't a traditional business book; at least, it's not the overhyped, how-to, warmed-over fluff that all too often dominates the genre. But the commission's report is a careful analysis of flawed organizations, and of the devastating effects of siloed cultures and ineffective management.

So it's finding fans in pockets across the business world. Felix Barber, a Zurich-based senior adviser to the Boston Consulting Group, says he thought the report was "one of the best books on organization I've read." Ian Mitroff, a professor at the Marshall School of Business at the University of Southern California, observes "virtually every page is about flawed organizations."
David Hain's insight:

Three brutally honest anatomies of catastrophe.  Read and learn about how to pick up failure the making! Very good.

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3 little words that define workplace relationships | @GreatLeadership

3 little words that define workplace relationships | @GreatLeadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
What are the most important three words for any relationship between a manager and employee?
No, it’s not “I love you.” Now that would be inappropriate, although not everyone would agree with that opinion. Love their jobs, yes. Love their managers or employees? Eew!
No, the most important three little words are: “I trust you.”
Trust is the foundation that a positive manager-employee relationship is built on. The absence of trust leads to micromanagement, fear, risk-aversion, backstabbing, destructive rumors, a lack of innovation, mistakes, and a lack of engagement.
What does trust look like? It’s all in the eye of the beholder, but here’s a starter list from both the manager’s and employee’s perspective:
David Hain's insight:

I. TRUST. YOU. The 3 most important words in the leadership lexicon, says Dan McCarthy.  Hard to think of 3 better ones!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, July 25, 8:37 AM

I agree with David Hain, you can't find 3 better words to cherish in business however love does require trust to exist bilaterally but we have an aversion to use it in business.

Ian Berry's curator insight, July 26, 11:12 PM

True. And it's definitely a two-way (and multiple way) street. The other words are Please and Thank You

Ed Nikora's curator insight, July 27, 4:24 AM

Trust has also been one of the four things identified in Gallups Strength Based Leadership book as something employees require of good leaders.  For a leader to sit and reflect on how they provide trust to their staff, we must first have our 'why'.  Why do we even value trust in our working relationships...and as with all things we value, like currency, how do we spend our Trust...as in how are we investing it with those we lead, manage or work with? 

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Reverse Mentoring: 3 Simple Steps That Will Transform Your Mentoring Program

Reverse Mentoring: 3 Simple Steps That Will Transform Your Mentoring Program | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Who was your first mentor?

This shouldn’t be a hard question. For most of us, it’s our parents. Did they impart wisdom and life experiences, guiding you through those awkward years of adolescence? Absolutely!

But guess what – you were their mentor too. Perhaps you taught them how to use a computer, send a tweet, or maybe even control a drone.

With this in mind, it’s easy to question why mentoring is a one-way street in the corporate world, with senior executives mentoring young employees. Can’t it go the other way too?
David Hain's insight:

Try reverse mentoring for a dynamic, win:win dialogue!

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Sally's curator insight, July 27, 9:35 AM

Relevant to peer mentoring, student organizations, and advising. 

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How My Experience At Disney Taught Me 3 Universal Laws

How My Experience At Disney Taught Me 3 Universal Laws | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
In 1979, I was lucky to get hired by Disney in their MAPO organization – the arm of Disney that designs and builds the equipment for theme park operations around the world.   My experience there was educational, inspirational and transformational.

While not knowing it at the time, I now realize that my experiences taught me three important universal laws that are core to every operational excellence endeavor; they are the Law of Oneness, Law of Action, and Law of Cause and Effect.
David Hain's insight:

How the universal laws play out in organisations like Disney!

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Characteristics and Best Practices of Successful CEOs | MetaOps Magezine

Characteristics and Best Practices of Successful CEOs | MetaOps Magezine | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Steven N. Kaplan, Mark M. Klebanov, and Morten Sorensen developed a unique dataset to study individual characteristics of successful CEOs. The research was supported by the Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation and the Olin Foundation through grants to the Stigler Center for the Study of the Economy and the State, the Center for Research in Security Prices. The report produced a statistical analysis that ranked and rated key characteristics that were correlated to “successful” CEOs as defined by company performance and internal surveys. The study was done in conjunction with the University Of Chicago Both School Of Business and the Columbia Business School. Data was based on the analysis of 316 CEOs.
David Hain's insight:

Interesting CEO spec from the Financial Services industry

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Top 3 Leadership Attributes Women Need in the 21st Century

Top 3 Leadership Attributes Women Need in the 21st Century | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
A 2015 study from Pew Research Center found that the majority of the American public agrees that women are as capable and qualified for corporate leadership as men are. Pew reports that "most Americans find women indistinguishable from men on key leadership traits such as intelligence and capacity for innovation, with many saying they're stronger than men in terms of being compassionate and organized leaders."

But as we all know, at the end of the day, that vote of confidence hasn't resulted in gender equality in top leadership positions. There's no need to restate the numbers; if you need a refresher, my recent post on growing momentum globally for gender quotas tells some of the story.

At SHAMBAUGH, our goal is to provide solutions rather than to dwell on why these challenges relating to women's leadership aren't progressing quickly enough. To that end, here is a summary of three top capabilities that women need to thrive as leaders, based on a recent McKinsey study of 250 high-ranking female executives and validated by SHAMBAUGH's own research:
David Hain's insight:

3 ladders to raise female leaders to the top?

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, July 24, 1:05 PM

What do you think? Are these valid?

Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, July 25, 2:43 AM

Resilience, grit and confidence... insight... good, like it...:-)))

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Point of view - how storytellers create truth

Point of view - how storytellers create truth | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Without POV, there is no story, just a bunch of “facts”. I put “facts” in quotation marks, because there are very few things that are fact, just as there is very little that is “the truth”. Yes, there is a lot of truth, but “the truth” is pretty rare. We can spend our whole lives searching for “the truth”, and many of us convince ourselves that we have found it, but authors know better.
The truth is that the hawk is hungry and needs to eat a meal, and that kitten on the lawn is obviously a tender, juicy meal. Time to go grocery shopping!
The truth is that the open lawn is a dangerous place, where folks are at the mercy of heartless monsters who can swoop out of the sky at a moment’s notice and gobble you up. Better run for cover!
Both of those stories are truth. Neither is “the truth”. Both are stories, and the storyteller controls your mind and your perception of truth through a simple device called point of view.
David Hain's insight:

The power of perception! How to manage 'point of view' - key skill for leaders seeking followers!

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Amabaie's comment, July 24, 9:22 AM
Now you make me think that I should have added, "If you speak to audiences..."
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Survey of top leadership Skills - Reading Between the Lines | MetaOps Magezine

Survey of top leadership Skills - Reading Between the Lines | MetaOps Magezine | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
As part of the Global Leadership Forecast 2014|2015, 1,528 HR executives responded helping to define the current focus of their Human Resource development programs and identifying the most critical skills leaders need to be successful over the next three years (the future).
David Hain's insight:

Survey shows getting on with other countries & other generations most difficult for leadership. Human skills required?

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How to Have a Coaching Conversation - Center for Creative Leadership

How to Have a Coaching Conversation - Center for Creative Leadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Coaching isn’t just something that specialized professionals do. In fact, some of the most powerful coaching experiences are informal exchanges in the hallways, cafeterias, offices and other workspaces in the course of everyday work.

Coaching conversations are an important means by which experiences are turned into learning, and nearly anyone can conduct them.
David Hain's insight:

Structured head space (coaching) - the key skills.

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Top 10 Lessons "Breaking Bad" & Walter White Taught Us About Building A Business

Top 10 Lessons "Breaking Bad" & Walter White Taught Us About Building A Business | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
It's no secret that Walter White made a fair amount of business mistakes throughout the course of Breaking Bad, but it's also difficult to argue with the fact that he was the show's most successful entrepreneur in many ways, surpassing even Gustavo Fring in many ways.

Here are 10 things to learn from how he went about building his empire. 
David Hain's insight:

Breaking Bad had many virtues. Leadership learning was one of them!

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Restoring Humanity to Leadership

Restoring Humanity to Leadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
With recovery underway in many advanced economies, money is surging back into leadership development after the down-years of the recession. In 2013, companies spent an estimated worldwide total of US$45.5 billion on education for leaders at all levels. But a raft of recent statistics show that these whopping investments are failing to move the needle where it matters most — from employee engagement to public trust. Even as they keep the billions pouring in, a majority of executives claim to have lost faith in leadership development altogether.

This situation brings two questions to mind: Exactly what accounts for the disappointment in leadership development programmes? And if they really do not work, why do companies keep buying, and buying into, them? In a recent paper “Can Business Schools Humanize Leadership?”, Gianpiero and Jennifer Petriglieri, professors of Organisational Behaviour at INSEAD, argue that it is precisely the most inadequate features of these programmes that prove irresistible to companies, executives and educators alike.

The Petriglieris argue that what they term “the leadership industrial complex” largely peddles a decontextualised, depersonalised view of leadership that has little relation with what leading looks and feels like in the real world. Clients, for their part, embrace the lofty but empty rhetoric of leadership skills and tools as a convenient distraction from the difficult conflicts leaders must navigate on a daily basis. Though the authors offer no easy, straightforward solutions — and in fact argue against such simple prescriptions — they do point the way to a more generative way of thinking about and developing leadership.

“You could call us optimistic critics, or sceptical optimists,” Gianpiero says.
David Hain's insight:

There is no value in asking yourself “Am I a leader?” Instead, ask “Who am I leading? And where am I going?” ~ INSEAD

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8 Common Elevator Pitch Blunders, and How to Fix Them

8 Common Elevator Pitch Blunders, and How to Fix Them | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Every entrepreneur needs a value proposition statement for his or her startup that can hook potential investors and partners in less than a minute -- the short time you might join them in an elevator on the way to their offices. This may sound easy, but every investor I know is frustrated by wasted time listening to rambling, emotional pitches that are not to the point.

Passionate entrepreneurs tend to talk on and on about their disruptive technology, their intent to change the world and free services, but if a business can’t provide quantifiable value to real customers, the dream will likely turn into a nightmare. The better you understand what makes an effective elevator pitch, the more likely you will attract investors and customers.
David Hain's insight:

What's your value proposition, and do you do justice to it in the way you express it?


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donhornsby's curator insight, July 23, 7:52 AM

(From the article): An entrepreneur’s elevator pitch embodies the value proposition that is being brought to customers, as well as investors and partners. Don’t hide it behind too many words, an urge to stay in the spotlight longer or unbridled passion. Catch the elevator up to make it a business.

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PBS - JOHN GARDNER - EDUCATION AND EXCELLENCE

PBS - JOHN GARDNER - EDUCATION AND EXCELLENCE | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
"Personal Renewal"
Delivered to McKinsey & Company, Phoenix, AZ
November 10, 1990

I'm going to talk about "Self-Renewal." One of your most fundamental tasks is the renewal of the organizations you serve, and that usually includes persuading the top officers to accomplish a certain amount of self-renewal. But to help you think about others is not my primary mission this morning. I want to help you think about yourselves.
David Hain's insight:

Brilliant talk recreated here.There's a myth that learning is for young people. But as the proverb says, "It's what you learn after you know it all that counts." ~ John Gardener

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What We Can Learn About Workplace Leadership From the Tour de France

What We Can Learn About Workplace Leadership From the Tour de France | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
I admit that I am a fair weather (OK, indoor) cyclist. Isn’t exercising in air conditioning always better than Texas weather?

As a twice-a-week spin class aficionado, I learned a lot from my uber competitive 60-something racing instructor. And, I also began watching the Tour de France.

If you haven’t watched the race, it has spectacular views and the occasional massive crash.

And although there are only a few winners each day, the teams are the real reason any one racer wins the yellow jersey as they roll into Paris.
David Hain's insight:

As a cycling fan, this appealed to me. For an even better pice on platoon leadership, see Ricard martin's piece at http://indalogenesis.com/2014/04/02/peloton-formations/

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Managing in the Digital Age: Over the Edge?

Managing in the Digital Age: Over the Edge? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Managing does not change, not fundamentally. It is a practice, rooted in art and craft, not a science or a profession, focused on analysis. The subject matter of managing certainly changes, all the time, as do the styles that some managers favor, but not the basic practice.
 
There is, however, one evident change in recent times that is influencing the practice of managing: the new digital technologies, which have dramatically increased speed and volume in the transmission of information. Have their impacts on managing been likewise dramatic?
 
My answer is yes and no. No, because these technologies mainly reinforce the very characteristics that have long prevailed in managerial work. But yes, because this very fact may mean that the practice of managing is being driven over the edge.
David Hain's insight:

'This digital age may be driving much management practice over the edge, making it too remote and too superficial.' ~ wise warning from Minzberg

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, July 24, 4:34 PM

Some interesting insights for all.

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The Daily Routine Experts Recommend for Peak Productivity

The Daily Routine Experts Recommend for Peak Productivity | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The strategy sounded simple, but Schwab and his executive team at Bethlehem Steel gave it a try. After three months, Schwab was so delighted with the progress his company had made that he called Lee into his office and wrote him a check for $25,000.

A $25,000 check written in 1918 is the equivalent of a $400,000 check in 2015. 

The Ivy Lee Method of prioritizing your to-do list seems stupidly simple. How could something this simple be worth so much?

What makes it so effective?
David Hain's insight:

The Ivy Lee productivity method. I could use this...

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Leadership Styles Are Often Why CEOs Get Fired

Leadership Styles Are Often Why CEOs Get Fired | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
It’s a long-held belief that CEOs get fired (or forced to resign or retire under pressure) because of “current financial performance.” But one of my past studies found that’s wrong. My team and I interviewed 1,087 board members from 286 organizations that fired, or otherwise forced out, their chief executive. And we found that most CEOs get fired for “soft issues.” Thirty-one percent of CEOs got fired for poor change management, 28% for ignoring customers, 27% for tolerating low performers, 23% for denying reality and 22% for too much talk and not enough action.
David Hain's insight:

After Ellen Pao, data on why CEOs really get fired!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, July 24, 4:37 PM

Some very interesting insights for leaders today, especially those striving to fill the corner office. For example,  some CEO's I know have been broadsided by change management.

Ian Berry's curator insight, July 29, 1:21 AM

Good insights into the essential ability and willingness of leaders to be self-aware, aware of others, and focused first on the people

Kevin Watson's curator insight, Today, 9:14 AM

After Ellen Pao, data on why CEOs really get fired!

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What History Can Teach Us About Leadership, Good, Bad, And Ugly | Task & Purpose

What History Can Teach Us About Leadership, Good, Bad, And Ugly | Task & Purpose | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
I believe the easiest way to explain leadership is through examples. History is rich with illustrations of all kinds of leadership, both good and bad. Personally, I gravitate toward the military kind, because that’s what I know and have dealt with my entire adult life. Military leadership is also some of the most dynamic and dramatic, because it can often mean the difference between life and death, victory and defeat.

The Civil War is rife with examples of spectacular leadership failures, particularly amongst the northern forces.  Most historians agree that President Abraham Lincoln was cursed with poor generals for the majority of the war, who handed loss after loss to him until General Ulysses Grant took over the Army of the Potomac in 1864. General John Pope, General Irvin McDowell, General Joe Hooker, and General Dan Sickles are but a few shining examples of colossal failures for the Union cause at multiple points during the war.
David Hain's insight:

'Leadership is a classic conundrum.  It’s absence is usually palpably felt, but try to accurately define it and it’s very difficult.' ~ Jason Nulton

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Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, July 22, 4:57 PM

What History Can Teach Us About Leadership, Good, Bad, And Ugly | Task & Purpose

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6 Leadership Failures That Put Your Company at Competitive Risk

6 Leadership Failures That Put Your Company at Competitive Risk | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Is yours the type of company whose focus is on the here and now or is it on the short and long-term future?   Do leaders and employees spend too much time mimicking what your competitors are doing, or are they driving the requirements to create and sustain competitive advantage?

In today’s rapid-paced, globally competitive marketplace, your company’s leadership must adopt a new mindset and accept the fact that without strategy, change is merely substitution – not evolution.

As you evaluate your senior leadership team, be on the lookout for the following six signs – that if not addressed proactively and strategically – will put your company in a position of competitive disadvantage, thus disrupting its ability to grow and compete.
David Hain's insight:

Companies fail to grow when leaders get lazy or complacent - spot the signs in your organisation. ~ Glenn Lopis

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Preparing Senior Leadership For The Influence Of The Cultural Shift On The 21st Century Workplace

Preparing Senior Leadership For The Influence Of The Cultural Shift On The 21st Century Workplace | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
“A new type of thinking is essential if mankind is to survive and move toward higher levels.” Albert Einstein said that, but we don’t need to be geniuses to implement new thinking in business. We only need real leadership that’s innovative and courageous enough to evolve and take action now. That’s how we close the growing opportunity gaps within the three pillars of workplace/workforce, external partnerships and the marketplace/consumer. We must see these opportunities everywhere every day and anticipate the unexpected, sow those opportunities and unleash our passionate pursuits, grow those opportunities with a strategic focus and entrepreneurial spirit, and share opportunities with a generous purpose. That’s how we reinvent leadership for the 21st century and sustain growth.

And it starts by asking one question: What are we solving for?
David Hain's insight:

The implications of cultural demographic shifts for leadership. How do you harness them for comp advantage?

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Should you fake empathy?

Should you fake empathy? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Have a nice day, and we hope you come back soon!” gushes the Disney store employee as I leave the premises. No matter how much I travel, I cannot get over my innate British cynicism which makes me want to roll my eyes at this enforced corporate cheerfulness.

But look deeper into the origins of that farewell and it is possible that somewhere in this enormous corporation there exists a genuine desire that their customers have ‘nice’ days. It may have occurred to somebody in the company that customers who have a good time really are more likely to return.

Indeed, the empathy and friendliness on display often isn’t fake at all, but a sincere attempt from headquarters to present a more human face to the outside world—and for solid business reasons. It is not a distraction from the more important business of making money. Rather it is an aid to making money.
David Hain's insight:

Is faking empathy really plastic, or can it lead to the real thing? Interesting take from Belinda Parmar

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Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, July 19, 7:57 AM

In short: "Yes, it's better than nothing..."... in a little bit longer: "yes and it's better to be a first step on the journey towards a real one..." ...and in little bit even longer one: read the post...:-)))

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Helping Teens Hit the Pause Button • Six Seconds

Helping Teens Hit the Pause Button • Six Seconds | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
How often do teens think before acting? You likely remember the time when you wish your younger self had stopped to think before taking your parent’s car out for a spin or having an angry outburst you later regretted. It is well known that the frontal lobe, the part of the brain that controls executive functions such as decision-making, does not finish connecting its neural pathways until the late teens/early twenties. Six Seconds has a model that can help young brains apply the pause button before acting out of strong emotions.

One person keen on helping youth learn the skills of consequential thinking is Sukai Ceesay. Certified by Six Seconds in EQ coaching , she is the founder of Global Village Children, a nonprofit based in Den Haag, The Netherlands whose mission is helping schools integrate emotional intelligence into their traditional curriculum. On June 9th, she gave a workshop at TEDx Youth at the International School at the Hague on applying consequential thinking for 10-15 year olds.
David Hain's insight:
What is required of me? Why is it necessary? How do I feel about it? What are the best possible ways to get it done? -Sukai Ceesay
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Surviving Your Paradigms - People Development Network

Surviving Your Paradigms - People Development Network | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
With the emergence of the Internet of Things and big data, most businesses are intrigued by emerging future opportunities. At the same time, many are frightened by the burgeoning security, privacy and ethical issues. Some business leaders wonder if they even need to embrace this development, as it would mean pursuing something that many consider to be a threat.

However, with the emergence of new technologies there is a realistic chance of making things better, more ethical and more sustainable for the future, but revolutions need new paradigms. The market economy could become a threat to society if we try to evaluate new technologies and opportunities through old paradigms. If we challenge our current paradigms in order to create sustainable and meaningful value propositions, and in order to create working environments that result in innovation and the creation of new perspectives, ethical and healthy capitalism can succeed.

Today’s leaders need to challenge paradigms in the fields of value creation, human resources and, above all, about the “truth” and actuality of their beliefs.
David Hain's insight:

When the wind of change blows, some build walls, others build windmills.” Chinese proverb, taken from the excellent People Development mag

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Don't Solve Your Problems

Don't Solve Your Problems | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Don’t solve your problems.
Recently, while conducting a workshop, I sat at a table with a group of intelligent leaders who were tackling a problem. As the trainer, it was my job to keep the group engaged in critical and strategic thinking.
But this group was stuck—stuck in their ideas, discussion, dialogue, and conversation. We were approaching the 45-minute mark, and they were just going around in circles.
I said, “Everyone, let’s stop this discussion. We’re taking a break. Put down your pens, leave your phones, and let’s get out of here.”
I had prepared by bringing some sports equipment. Excited as kids at a chance to play outside, they were quickly caught up in a rousing game of wiffle ball.
By the time I called them back in a short time later, everyone was relaxed and enjoying themselves. Even before they had a chance to sit down, I asked, “How do we tackle this issue? What do we do next?”
And it all came together. They had a direction, and they were all in agreement.
This is not news for anyone who has done coaching or consulting with teams. Taking a break is good science.
David Hain's insight:

Problems sometimes respond to infusion before solving - Lolly Daskal

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All Great Leadership Styles Begin By Spending Time With Employees

All Great Leadership Styles Begin By Spending Time With Employees | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Are you spending enough time with your employees…or too much? New research reveals that the median time employees spend interacting with leaders is approximately three hours per week – just half of the six hours found to be optimal for employee engagement.  Regardless of which of the myriad leadership styles you prefer, spending time with employees is a universal requirement.

According to a new study “Optimal Hours with the Boss” from Leadership IQ, most people spend only half the time they should be spending with their boss. People who do spend an optimal number of hours interacting with their direct leader (six hours per week) are 29% more inspired, 30% more engaged, 16% more innovative and 15% more intrinsically motivated than those who spend only one hour per week.
David Hain's insight:

“Face-time matters for both leaders and employees alike,” ~ Mark Murphy. But only if you use it wisely.

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, July 17, 11:27 AM

Agree, but it is dependent on how authentic and transparent the spent time is on both sides of the equation. One side can start but it takes both sides to build a relationship.


Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.