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10 Mental Blocks of Creative Thinking

10 Mental Blocks of Creative Thinking | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
psych-facts:
“ 1. Trying to Find the “Right” Answer
One of the worst aspects of formal education is the focus on the correct answer to a particular question or problem. While this approach helps us...
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Are You a Strong Leader? Answer These 3 Questions and Find Out

Are You a Strong Leader? Answer These 3 Questions and Find Out | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

When I looked at the data, I learned that the feedback sandwich doesn’t taste as good as it looks.

Problem 1: the positives fall on deaf ears. When people hear praise during a feedback conversation, they brace themselves. They’re waiting for the other shoe to drop, and it makes the opening compliment seem insincere. You didn’t really mean it; you were just trying to soften the blow.

Problem 2: if you avoid that risk and manage to be genuine about the positives, they can drown out the negatives. Research shows that primacy and recency effects are powerful: we often remember what happens first and last a conversation, glossing over the middle. When you start and end with positive feedback, it’s all too easy for the criticism to get buried or discounted.

Giving a compliment sandwich might make the giver feel good, but it doesn’t help the receiver.

Instead, try these four steps to make your criticism feel constructive:

David Hain's insight:

Very limited growth without feedback - but not all feedback is created equal. Here's how to do it, via @AdamMGrant!

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Gino Bondi's curator insight, May 4, 3:35 PM

Great post that provides four steps to make your criticism feel constructive. Well worth the clip

Authentis Formations's curator insight, May 5, 6:20 AM
Très belle discussion sur le feedback !
Abel Linares's curator insight, May 5, 2:34 PM
Ask them if they're ready!
That has especially helped me when delivering feedback.
Four steps to make your criticism feel constructive @AdamMGrant

1. Explain why you’re giving the feedback 
2. Take yourself off a pedestal
 3. Ask if the person wants feedback 
4. Have a transparent dialogue, not a manipulative monologue

People are remarkably open to criticism when they believe it’s intended to help them.
Breaking the cycle of mistrust by APA (American Psychological Association)
“I’m giving you these comments because I have very high expectations and I know that you can reach them.”
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Are You a Strong Leader? Answer These 3 Questions and Find Out

Are You a Strong Leader? Answer These 3 Questions and Find Out | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
How I lead could be mildly interesting. How to lead is always relevant and is also the subject of countless articles and books. But how you lead and continually assess your effectiveness regardless of your position is of critical importance. Too many discussions on leadership are focused on the top of the organizational hierarchy, when in fact leadership is prevalent in all.

The reality is that every single one of us is a leader. At a minimum, every day you lead yourself to make various decisions for good or bad. You lead projects and initiatives at home and work. The leadership choices you make influence and affect the people around you, your family and your fellow teammates. You either give or take energy by the way you lead. You either accelerate or impede progress by the way you lead.

You are a leader whether you like it or not. The question is: Are you a strong leader? Answer the following three questions to find out.
David Hain's insight:

How often do you look in the mirror? Next time you do, here's someuseful questions to ponder.

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Are Leaders Born or Made? Here’s What’s Coachable — and What’s Definitely Not.

Are Leaders Born or Made? Here’s What’s Coachable — and What’s Definitely Not. | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
For some people, the question of whether leaders are born or made is truly intellectual – fodder for a good classroom or dinner party debate. But for people in front-line positions to hire, promote, and fire, the question, “Who has the right stuff to lead?” definitely has more urgency. Getting the answer right can drive an organization’s culture and performance to new levels. Getting it wrong can too — downwards.

So what’s the answer? Of course, since we’re talking about real life here, it isn’t neat or simple. The facts are, some leadership traits are inborn, and they’re big whoppers. They matter a lot. On the other hand, two key leadership traits can be developed with training and experience – in fact, they need to be.
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The Social Imperative For CEOs — Medium

The Social Imperative For CEOs — Medium | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
In this age of the distrustful customer and investor, firms have had to boost their transparency, presenting not just their strengths but also their weaknesses. The premise is that a more even-handed perspective builds more relationship capital, not less. It just seems that many CEOs are communicating in worn-out cliches (how many times have we heard “win-win” and “customer-centric” is our motto?).
David Hain's insight:

How social are you? How social is your CEO? If that's two 'not verys', read this article from @StandardOfTrust!

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Abel Linares's curator insight, May 5, 2:47 PM
We never stop learning ourselves, regardless of our #leadership positions we need to change the rules by delivering high-impact outcomes for a new trust-enabled world
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More Important than Knowing When to Lead is Knowing When to Follow

More Important than Knowing When to Lead is Knowing When to Follow | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Leadership is not a title or position; it’s power, but not power in the sense that we usually think about power. It is the power to inspire others to do more than they ever thought possible in the best interest of the greater good. On the flipside, anyone can become a follower regardless of the position that they hold. So, why would you ever want to follow if you can lead? The most effective leaders understand that they do not know everything, neither are they always the ones with the greatest influence. Being a great leader requires knowing when to lead and when to follow. Here are four questions to ask yourself to determine whether you should be leading or following.
David Hain's insight:

All leaders have to follow, too. Liz Stincelli, @infinitestin, on how to work out when!

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Gino Bondi's curator insight, May 4, 3:47 PM

Four questions to ask yourself to determine whether you should be leading or following

Authentis Formations's curator insight, May 5, 6:26 AM
Great leader know when to lead, but even more important, they know when to follow.
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How small shifts in leadership can transform your team dynamic | McKinsey & Company

How small shifts in leadership can transform your team dynamic | McKinsey & Company | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Simple tweaks in communication and role-modeling based on the latest behavioral research can nudge employees into top form and create a more productive environment for everyone.
David Hain's insight:

Useful leadership nudges that play to the way our brains work.

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Tuning in to Trust & Ethics: Starbucks and Howard Schultz

Tuning in to Trust & Ethics: Starbucks and Howard Schultz | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

In Capitalism and Freedom (1962) the late American economist Milton Friedman wrote:

There is one and only one social responsibility of business — to use its resources and engage in activities designed to increase its profits so long as it stays within the rules of the game, which is to say, engages in open and free competition without deception or fraud.

There is a small and growing cadre of CEOs who are simply no longer accepting Friedman’s theory as gospel.

One of them is Howard Schultz, CEO of Starbucks. This past January, Schultz was the first CEO to be honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award by Trust Across America. And just recently in his annual address to shareholders, Howard asked his audience to consider two questions:

What is the role & responsibility of a for profit company?
What is the role and responsibility of all of us as citizens?


We asked members of our Trust Alliance and our Top Thought Leaders to weigh in on Howard’s video and questions, and are sharing a few of the responses.

David Hain's insight:

Trust Across America on why the received wisdom of capitalism should be questioned. well worth reading.

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Getting beyond the BS of leadership literature 

Getting beyond the BS of leadership literature  | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Despite the many shortcomings of leadership instruction, some books and articles do provide fruitful guidance on how to be a better, more effective leader. And there’s scattered information about what skills and behavior are needed to get things done and how to develop them. Sadly, and for a number of reasons, there’s a scarcity of useful material. Here’s why.
David Hain's insight:

An off the wall leadership book list form an arch-critic of teh leadership industry!

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The One Thing You Need to Be an Effective Leader

The One Thing You Need to Be an Effective Leader | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
It was a difficult moment in the history of the BBC, the venerable British media organization: an experimental news division had not met expectations, and after a trial year was being shut down.

Making a Bad Situation Worse

A top-level executive was sent to deliver the bad news, and did it in the worst way. With a haughty tone he said he had just come from a media convention in Monte Carlo where he heard from competitive news outfits how well they were doing - and then announced that this experimental division had done so poorly that they were closing it. As he went on in this tone, the staff became more and more disgruntled - even outright hostile - to the point that the building security folks had to help him exit the room.

A Positive Perspective

The next day another executive came to the division to talk over the change. He started by saying that his career had been in journalism, like them, and that their livelihood rose and fell with the economy - and no one went into the field to get rich. He talked about times he had been let go, and how he had found new opportunities. And he ended by reminding them that journalists are essential to a democracy, serving as the central nervous system, delivering key information to all, a noble calling.

When he finished, he got a standing ovation.
David Hain's insight:

I usually avoid promoting "one thing" articles, but this one thing is pretty insightful. The impotance of connection!

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The genuine faker | @btreasurer

The genuine faker | @btreasurer | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
“At first, I had no idea what the hell I was doing. I was in way over my head, and scared as hell.” When asked how he went from being a manager of five people to a leader of eighty, he replied, “Sometimes you have to fake it till you make it. You don’t start with the skills; you develop them along the way.”
David Hain's insight:

We've all been there. Good piece on ways to lead when you don't know how!

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A Breakthrough for Coach and Client • Six Seconds

A Breakthrough for Coach and Client • Six Seconds | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
What happens when a twenty-five year old feels stuck about making life-changing decisions? Can coaching in emotional intelligence help get him excited about the future again? In this case study of a real coaching session, a coach in training uses Six Seconds SEI assessment to help a young man identify areas where he can build on his strengths to make major life decisions about school, relationships, and career. A year can make a huge difference.
David Hain's insight:

Useful coaching case study. Plus a bit of 101 about EQ!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 22, 1:58 PM

Good discussion worth reading.

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Transformational Leadership: Taught or Talent? -

Transformational Leadership: Taught or Talent? - | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Perhaps we have so closely tied worth and value as a human being with the title Leader that to say that someone does not have leadership is to dehumanize them to some degree.  But whatever we decide to call it, there will always be some people who take charge and inspire change.  And there will always be a team of people that take some responsibility in making that change happen.  Let’s start appreciating people for who they are and recognize their contributions.  Everyone has talent.  But we all don’t have to have the same talent.
David Hain's insight:

Can we be taught to transform, or do we have to be born with the potential? And is leader just another word for human being?

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donhornsby's curator insight, April 22, 9:26 AM


(From the article):Perhaps we have so closely tied worth and value as a human being with the title Leader that to say that someone does not have leadership is to dehumanize them to some degree. But whatever we decide to call it, there will always be some people who take charge and inspire change. And there will always be a team of people that take some responsibility in making that change happen. Let’s start appreciating people for who they are and recognize their contributions. Everyone has talent. But we all don’t have to have the same talent. - See more at: http://goodmenproject.com/business-ethics-2/transformational-leadership-taught-or-talent-mrnd/#sthash.BRFl3rQz.dpuf
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 22, 1:57 PM

Great discussion.  Where do you stand on the subject?

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The Countries with the Boldest Business Leaders

The Countries with the Boldest Business Leaders | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Fortune favors the bold, goes the old Roman saying. Our research suggests fortune is not alone in this: so do the Americans and the Chinese. But although some cultures do like boldness in their leaders, and reward it when they see it, this isn’t universally true.

Our leadership development work with organizations has given us a database of 360-degree assessments from over 75,000 business leaders around the world. In the last couple of years, we’ve heard from multiple Fortune 100 companies that they’re interested in encouraging their leaders to be bolder, so we wanted to look more closely at that type of leadership. We identified seven behaviors from the standard assessment that, taken together, would measure a leader’s boldness:
David Hain's insight:

Ho bold are you as a leader? Find out here.

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37 Books That Will Make You Better at Business

37 Books That Will Make You Better at Business | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
No matter how many years of experience you have in your field, there is always more you can learn. Whether it's from people you meet in line at Starbucks, your Uber driver, friends and colleagues, or a great book. You can take something away from every interaction.

I've met some incredible entrepreneurs, and whenever I can, I'll ask them their favorite books to add to my mental list -- I'm a huge fan of Audible and I'll try and listen to at least one book a week. I highly recommend it.
David Hain's insight:

Pretty decent book list if you are interested in business leadership and change!

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Our society has become more polarized. Here's how to survive this new normal.

Our society has become more polarized. Here's how to survive this new normal. | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
SURVIVING AND THRIVING IN THE 85% WORLD

Here’s how I explain it to my clients: You could cure cancer and 85% of the world will name hospitals after you, give you a Nobel prize, throw ticker tape parades and name you TIME magazine’s, ‘Person of the Year.’

But watch out for the other 15%—they’ll come after you. You’re the bad guy who put pharmaceutical companies out of business, emptied hospital beds, took away business from respected oncologists and put compassionate cancer nurses on the unemployment line.

In other words, 85% is the new 100%.
David Hain's insight:

The important distinction between fads and trends, plus other wisdom bites!

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malek's curator insight, April 22, 7:00 AM

a thought provoking approach to a new global challenge

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The Right Way to Get Angry at Work

The Right Way to Get Angry at Work | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Workplace anger often gets a bad rap. It conjures up images of hotheaded bosses who intimidate their employees, or creative types with big egos who can’t stand being critiqued. From multiple news outlets, we witness disgruntled coworkers “going postal” and resorting to violence after becoming enraged at something or somebody. Or perhaps we think of the everyday hassles that stir up resentment at work, from coworkers not meeting our expectations to passive-aggressive emails. 


But not all anger is created equal. Some types of anger—particularly “moral anger,” a concept we delineate in a recent paper published in the Journal of Organizational Behavior—may be crucial to the health of our institutions.
David Hain's insight:

If you believe you have some moral authority, a bit of positive dissonance is a good thing! But say you are angry rather thanhit people!

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5 Reasons Leaders Should Move Out of the Way

5 Reasons Leaders Should Move Out of the Way | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Sometimes leaders get in the way, and when they do, damaging things can happen.

They bottleneck decisions – people get frustrated
They block communication – people turn cynical
They put process before progress – people quit stretching
They issue orders  – people start resisting
They punish mistakes – people avoid creativity
They approve everything – people relinquish responsibility
And so on.

When leaders get out-of-the-way, beautiful things can happen.
David Hain's insight:

Scott Mabry @soul2work on the need to get out of your own road and the perils of not doing so!

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Six Habits of The Best Conversationalists

Six Habits of The Best Conversationalists | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Some people have the gift of gab, and can talk to anyone about anything. And some people struggle to make small talk. What separates the two isn’t knowing what to talk about; it’s polishing up your communication skills so you can keep a good conversation going.

"Good conversations require a give and take, just like keeping a ball in the air during a game of catch," says Anne Green, president and CEO of CooperKatz & Company, a communications and media-training firm with clients that include Richard Branson. "When someone directs a question your way—when the ball is thrown to you—you should always respond with an answer that will continue the flow of dialogue, passing the ball back and never letting it drop."
David Hain's insight:

May seem basic - but some people do converstaion sooo much better than others. Some why's here.

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Why this Wharton wunderkind wants leaders to replace their intuition with evidence

Why this Wharton wunderkind wants leaders to replace their intuition with evidence | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Research finds that hiring people for “cultural fit” is actually a bad strategy in the long run because it can crowd out fresh ideas. A psychology concept called “idiosyncrasy credits” helps explain why people should wait to share bold ideas until they have status first. 
David Hain's insight:

Adam Grant on the imprtance and application of idiosyncratic credit, aka the way the world works! Plus other excellent insights.

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Why Leaders Who Listen Achieve Breakthroughs

Why Leaders Who Listen Achieve Breakthroughs | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
As a leader, communicating can sometimes feel like Groundhog Day. No matter how hard you try to get your message across, it is all too easy to find the next day that you face the same blank stares, predictable objections, and questions that indicate that you failed to make it stick — that people just aren’t getting it. One reason leaders find themselves in this cycle is that their approach to communication is based on an outdated mental model. It’s a model best described as a “post office.” They view themselves as the sender of a message and others as the receivers. If problems arise, leaders look for disruption somewhere along the route.

The post office model focuses most leaders’ attention on the sending process, rather than the give-and-take of effective conversations. Even if they invite people to ask questions and truly value their buy-in, these leaders are still preoccupied with their message. This leaves them ignorant about the larger context and reality on the ground, including emerging issues and game-changing opportunities. In the extreme, thinking in terms of the post office model causes leaders to make decisions in isolation or miss the early warning signs of dysfunctional momentum.
David Hain's insight:

Dialogue is a 2-way process, recieving is more important much of the time than transmitting!

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Roger Francis's curator insight, April 5, 5:26 AM

Dialogue is a 2-way process, recieving is more important much of the time than transmitting!

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“Don’t Take It Personally” Is Terrible Work Advice

“Don’t Take It Personally” Is Terrible Work Advice | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
It’s a sentiment we have all often heard in work contexts: “Don’t take it personally” or “Hey, it’s not personal, it’s business.” I’ve heard it said about feedback, conflict, difficult conversations, restructuring, losing deals, collaboration, dealing with career ups and downs — all kinds of daily workplace issues.

And yet it’s an absurd idea.
David Hain's insight:

Partly good advice, imho - need to see the big picture as well as feeling events at a personal level. Higher learning is  to do both!

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Leaders Can Learn From Good Parents

Leaders Can Learn From Good Parents | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Bernard Marr is the author of a number of best-selling books, a keynote speaker, and a consultant in strategic performance, analytics, KPIs and big data. He’s the founder and CEO of the Advanced Performance Institute, and has become a leading global authority on organisational and business success.

It goes without saying that when he speaks, you listen.

Recently, Marr posted an informative piece to his LinkedIn account in which he lists ways that bad leaders can learn from good parents.

Marr believes “many of the qualities that make you a good parent are the same that will make you a great leader, and many of us would do well to look to dear old mum and dad for an example of how to lead any organisation well.”
David Hain's insight:

Leaders  can utilise parenting skills effectively as long as they don't become paternalisic and remember they are leading adults!

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How small shifts in leadership can transform your team dynamic 

How small shifts in leadership can transform your team dynamic  | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Once upon a time, saying “the soft stuff is the hard stuff” was a snappy challenge to business convention. Now, it’s a cliché. Everyone knows that it’s not easy to suddenly make your colleagues more creative, adaptable, or collaborative, however well-intentioned you may be.

But thanks to research on human behavior, we know what it takes for the average person’s brain to perform at its best, cognitively and emotionally—even under the pressures of the modern workplace. These new insights suggest that simple tweaks in leaders’ communication and behavior can potentially create a much more productive atmosphere for any team. In this article, I’ll describe three leaders who knew enough of this science to spark positive behavioral shifts in their organizations.
David Hain's insight:

Neuro-based leadership nudges worth incorporating into your approach to others.

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Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, April 2, 9:18 AM

Neuro-based leadership nudges worth incorporating into your approach to others.

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 4, 6:48 PM

Neuro-based leadership nudges worth incorporating into your approach to others.  - What do you think? 

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Decoding leadership: What really matters | McKinsey & Company

Decoding leadership: What really matters | McKinsey & Company | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Our most recent research, however, suggests that a small subset of leadership skills closely correlates with leadership success, particularly among frontline leaders. Using our own practical experience and searching the relevant academic literature, we came up with a comprehensive list of 20 distinct leadership traits. Next, we surveyed 189,000 people in 81 diverse organizations4 around the world to assess how frequently certain kinds of leadership behavior are applied within their organizations. Finally, we divided the sample into organizations whose leadership performance was strong (the top quartile of leadership effectiveness as measured by McKinsey's Organizational Health Index) and those that were weak (bottom quartile).

What we found was that leaders in organizations with high-quality leadership teams typically displayed 4 of the 20 possible types of behavior; these 4, indeed, explained 89 percent of the variance between strong and weak organizations in terms of leadership effectiveness (exhibit).
David Hain's insight:

89% of leadership effectiveness down to 4 characteristics, say McKinsey. What do you think? How do you rate?

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Ian Berry's curator insight, April 2, 8:35 PM

89% of leadership effectiveness down to 4 characteristics, say McKinsey. What do you think? How do you rate? I think the biggest behaviour from which a lot of the others flow is "fully appreciating and getting the best out of yourself and other people."

Dr. Deborah Brennan's curator insight, April 4, 7:31 AM

89% of leadership effectiveness down to 4 characteristics, say McKinsey. What do you think? How do you rate?

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 4, 6:50 PM

89% of leadership effectiveness down to 4 characteristics, say McKinsey. What do you think? How do you rate? - If this doesn't overturn the 48 Laws of Power, I am not sure what will?

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Is Your Leadership Style Right for the Digital Age?

Is Your Leadership Style Right for the Digital Age? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Advancement in digital technologies has disrupted everything, including leadership styles, according to Barry Libert, Jerry Wind and Megan Beck Fenley. Employees want more ownership rather than to follow instruction; customers want to participate in the marketing and development process; and leaders are finding that open and agile organizations are able to maneuver more effectively than organizations where “all insight and direction comes from the top. In short, the autocratic Commander, whether brilliant or misguided, just won’t cut it anymore,” they write in this opinion piece.
David Hain's insight:

Commander style rarely cuts it, these days. Probably never did, on reflection...

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Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.