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What Leaders Do When They're At Their Best | Fast Company

What Leaders Do When They're At Their Best | Fast Company | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

For 30 years, Jim Kouzes has asked leaders about their peak performances for "Leadership Challenge"--the book he and Barry Posner coauthored that has been called the best ever written on the subject. Fast Company talks to Kouzes about the essentials of leadership.


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Your Company Culture Is Who You Hire, Fire, & Promote: Part 2, Anatomy of an Asshole

Your Company Culture Is Who You Hire, Fire, & Promote: Part 2, Anatomy of an Asshole | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
“Asshole” is not a term I use clinically/scientifically, but people use it commonly because it provides a shared understanding of something you “know when you see it.” So my goal here is to clearly categorize a pattern that you probably intuitively recognize, in a way that’s more insightful.

Clinically, there are three distinct types of socially aversive personalities, known as the “Dark Triad”: psychopathy, narcissism, and Machiavellianism. These traits are dimensional in a sense that all of us fall somewhere on the spectrum, but only those who are very high in the trait can be considered diagnosable with a full-blown personality disorder. If you’re curious, you can take the online Short Dark Triad personality test to see at what percentile you exhibit these three traits, compared to the general population.

The key to understanding the Dark Triad is that while all three share a callousness toward others that encourages manipulativeness, they do so for distinct reasons. Psychopaths are driven by short-term tangible rewards, and engage in reckless, antisocial behavior to get it. Machiavellians are fueled by long-term tangible rewards and will strategize schemes to get them. Narcissists are motivated by whatever boosts their ego, whether tangible rewards or simple praise that validates their idealized self-image.
David Hain's insight:

The Dark Triad of personality - or how to spot the asshole!

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Breaking Bad: Why Good People Become Evil Bosses

Breaking Bad: Why Good People Become Evil Bosses | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
So this article, Part 3, is an answer to the organizational paradox of why good people become evil bosses. Here are three archetypal stories of those who “break bad” into Machiavellianism: the hard-driving leader, the conniving executive, and the striving employee. Take a walk through the darkness with me…
David Hain's insight:

Great series on the shadow side of our personalities applied to leadership!

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Skipping On Sleep? Think Again

Skipping On Sleep? Think Again | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Can resilience be lost once acquired? The answer is a clear and resounding YES! and probably more easily than is thought.

To understand why this is so we need to examine some of the accepted fundamental characteristics of resilience which include such things as impulse control; empathy; emotional regulation; optimism; and critical thinking.

While all of these can be learnt and developed, research is now showing that our ability to do so is highly dependent upon our well-being. Moreover, as sleep underpins our well-being, the link between sleep and the resilient leader is becoming clearer.

In times of stress a leader may well choose to skip on sleep in the belief that they will get more done or be more effective in resolving issues. However this is far from reality and any productivity gains thought to be achieved from skipping sleep are quickly undone by the negative effects sleep deprivation has on the ability to access higher-level brain functions.

David Hain's insight:

Make sure you get your 8 hours - it's not just beauty sleep!

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The Elements of the Platform Organization – Stories of Platform Design

The Elements of the Platform Organization – Stories of Platform Design | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
If you want to adopt platform thinking to rethink your organization — or part of it — try to look at the existing situation and ask yourself where these elementary components are:
are there channels ready to enable simple value creation?
what are the intelligence metrics to understand how the system is performing, as a whole, in terms of learning? Is it getting better?
does the company have a culture of nurturing, mentoring, tutoring that ensure relational learning?
is the governance process ensuring the organizations can learn, adapt and evolve?
Being it a single process or the whole organization, if you want to rethink how your organizations works in the connected age, you can start from this simple model and ask these key questions.
David Hain's insight:

An introduction to platform thinking, HT Satori Lab!

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9 Signs That You're An Ambivert

9 Signs That You're An Ambivert | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
I’m sure you’ve been asked many times whether you’re an introvert or an extrovert. For some people, it’s an easy choice, but for most of us, it’s difficult to choose one way or the other.

It’s hard to choose because the introvert/extrovert dichotomy reflects a tired and outdated view of personality. Personality traits exist along a continuum, and the vast majority of us aren’t introverts or extroverts — we fall somewhere in the middle.

David Hain's insight:

Personality is not a binary choice. But we often - unhelpfully - make it seem so...

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, Today, 2:41 AM

Rather than seeing personality as a binary, look at is as a continuum because we can all move between extremes when it comes to personality.

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How thinking like a magician can help you get ahead at work

How thinking like a magician can help you get ahead at work | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Getting ready to do something great isn’t always easy, but it is more important than you might realize. Smart leaders, like magicians, know there’s a science to preparation. The process of proactivity starts with envisioning the effect you ultimately want to achieve. A can’t-lose business deal, or the magical illusion that will launch your career? The more important your objective is to you, the more important it is that you load up carefully. For critical events, I actually go to such extremes of preparation that my acts sometimes fool other magicians, who can’t imagine that I’d prepare more than they do.

Consider the goals that matter most in your career and personal life, and ask yourself how you can best prepare to reach those objectives. What do you need to learn to put yourself at the top of your game? What skills will give you the greatest advantage? What could be added to your repertoire to help you jump the gap between your particular audience’s expectations and a triumphal performance?
David Hain's insight:

Leadership meets Harry Houdini - the result is a useful set of insights!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 21, 8:05 AM

I agree with this concept to a degree but I can also see where companies could try to use this to manipulate. I am all about being observant, proactive, and transparent whereas magic is often more about misdirection or diversion.

donhornsby's curator insight, May 22, 9:15 AM
Preparation is the key trick used by magicians — and it can help you conjure big wow moments, too, says David Kwong.
 
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An introduction to the laws, or principles, of the BetaCodex (part 4)

An introduction to the laws, or principles, of the BetaCodex (part 4) | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
"We are the #network with #answers for #organizations in the knowledge economy. The consequent application of our alternative mindset turns these answers into reality." Founded in early 2008, and building upon the pioneering work of the Beyond Budgeting Round Table (BBRT), this network is different: The BetaCodex Network is focused on #transforming organizations, not #talking. It is open source. It is inclusive.
This network is taking the #BetaCodex - or: #BeyondBudgeting, as it was formerly known - to a new level, by making it real.
David Hain's insight:

Command and control has been dying for years, except in crises. Here is a sound basis for it's replacement.

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 21, 7:52 AM

Good alternative, the key is getting adoption.  What do you think?

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Cognitive bias cheat sheet, simplified

Cognitive bias cheat sheet, simplified | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The 4 conundrums of the universe that lead to all biases

There are 4 qualities of the universe that limit our own intelligence and the intelligence of every other person, collective, organism, machine, alien, or imaginable god. All 200ish of our known biases are attempts to work around these conundrums!

David Hain's insight:

This is a great resource on how we can be alert to our faulty thinking tendencies!

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Inside out - a tribute to Sir John Whitmore

Inside out - a tribute to Sir John Whitmore | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
More than 30 years after they first launched modern coaching and Inner Game thinking, Tim Gallwey and John Whitmore believe the approach has more to offer now than ever before

Tim Gallwey and Sir John Whitmore, along with Laura Whitworth and Thomas Leonard, are often credited with launching modern coaching in the 1970s. They are also among the main proponents of the Inner Game approach first developed by Gallwey.

Despite its links with modern research into mindfulness and neuroscience, Inner Game thinking is still not as widely appreciated by the coaching community as it could be.

So Gallwey and Whitmore have come together once more to roll out open and corporate coaching programmes through Performance Consultants International. They believe the Inner Game, which Gallwey has evolved, still has plenty to offer.
David Hain's insight:

We lost the visionary who pioneered today's coaching industry recently. An article in his honour from Coaching at Work.

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Org Physics: How a triad of structures allows companies to absorb complexity

Org Physics: How a triad of structures allows companies to absorb complexity | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The new, emerging theory of organizations is this: Every organization has three kinds of power, and three forms of leadership, three structures. This is not a menu. There is no decision to make about having all three structures, or not. None of the three structures is optional, or nice to have. They are part of organizational physics - universal laws that apply to every organization, large or small, old or new, for profit or social.

David Hain's insight:

Very persuasive conceptualisation of leadership levers, from Nils Pflaeging.

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 19, 11:33 AM

This is a good step in understanding leadership.  I have always maintained that an organization is held together by a matrix of relationships and this address some of that concept.

Ian Berry's curator insight, May 19, 7:27 PM
Agree an excellent article. For value to be created (delivered) people must feel valued and be living values. More on these at http://blog.ianberry.biz/2017/02/for-your-best-business-results-turn.html
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Leadership: sprint, marathon & relay race

Leadership: sprint, marathon & relay race | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Research by McKinsey, Harvard, Columbia, and myriad other consultancies, think tanks and universities show that organizations with diverse leadership are 35% more likely to have better financial returns.  So, advancing women’s leadership is a vital business imperative.  And, I hope men will share with all your male colleagues why “women in leadership” is not just a women’s issue.

What’s valid for women’s leadership applies to all of us, if we can break out of long-held but untrue and unfair stereotypes about what each sex can achieve. There’s extensive research on the unconscious biases we all have about men and women so even if you believe you are an extremely progressive person, you must be vigilant and self-aware about when you might be letting these assumptions affect your judgment.
David Hain's insight:

Useful wisdom from @beCauseGlobal CEO, Nadine Hack, on how to construct a leadership frame to flex your approach to project and life circumstances.

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 19, 11:37 AM

Interesting description of Leadership in change that I agree with but I would also add that there are some change engagements that are really "IronMan" events, composed of sprints, marathons and relays so buckle up.

 

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Investments, Not Indulgences

Investments, Not Indulgences | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
A theme that comes up consistently in my coaching practice is the difficulty leaders experience making time for practices that could be described as forms of self-care, such as exercise, sleep, meditation, or reflection. It’s not that my clients don’t view these activities as important—they’re well aware that staying active, being well-rested, pursuing mindfulness, and thinking deeply are priorities. And it’s rarely the case that my clients lack the freedom to make time for these activities--most of them are CEOs or in other senior leadership roles that afford them substantial control over their calendars.

The difficulty lies in how they tend to view these activities—as indulgences. My clients are happy workaholics who enjoy pushing themselves to achieve aspirational goals (an identity I share). This attitude can be a powerful advantage, motivating them to go above and beyond the call of duty, but it also has a shadow side that must be managed carefully, particularly when people have advanced to senior leadership roles.
David Hain's insight:

Ed Batista on how - and why - self-care is an essential investment for us all!

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Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg Shares the Key to Creating Chemistry at the Top

Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg Shares the Key to Creating Chemistry at the Top | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
It’s no surprise that the most successful companies have great leadership teams at the top. Dubbed Silicon Valley’s “oddest couple” by The New York Times, together Sheryl Sandberg and Mark Zuckerberg have driven Facebook’s astronomical growth and supported one another along the way.

I recently connected with Sheryl for my Office Hours podcast series to discuss what’s behind Facebook’s success and her partnership with Mark – it’s a dynamic countless CEOs and COOs dream of having. In a relationship as critical as the one at the top, how do you create open lines of communication, respect differences and grow the business together? If we take Sheryl and Mark as the model, it boils down to three things: carve out time to communicate, prioritize the relationship and find a partner who shares your values.

As with any healthy relationship, open communication is key according to Sheryl. Despite their well-documented differences – from their backgrounds to their working styles and even clothing (she dresses up; he’s usually found in a hoodie) – Sheryl and Mark both believe in open communication. For them, that means 1:1s at the beginning and end of every week.
David Hain's insight:

How the 'odd couple' keep `Facebook moving. It's not rocket science, but it often doesn't happen...

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Tom Wojick's curator insight, May 17, 7:28 PM

The key to pulling this off is emotional intelligence.

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 18, 1:19 PM

What do you think?

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5 Ways to Succeed with an Inflexible Pigheaded Boss

5 Ways to Succeed with an Inflexible Pigheaded Boss | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Organizations need rigid people even if some think they’re evil. You don’t need the dark-side of their strength. But without them, inconsistency escalates into instability.

Sure, they stress themselves and others. They complain about missed commons. But, they’re great at following procedures and delivering consistent results.

David Hain's insight:

You can get on with that stubborn SOB - but only if you adapt your approach...

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The Biggest Mistakes New Executives Make

The Biggest Mistakes New Executives Make | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Organizations invest a lot of time and money in hiring the right CEO or senior executive to set a vision and make the changes in their company. Yet within the first 18 months, there’s a 50% chance the executive will leave the organization. This failure comes with enormous costs, not only in disruption to the organization but financially, too. One estimate puts the cost at 10 times the executive’s salary – sometimes more.

The reasons these individuals leave are many. They often cite poor cultural fit, inadequate onboarding, or the lack of appropriate expectations. But in reality, many new executives inadvertently set themselves up for failure within the first few months of their tenure through their own actions.

As an executive hired from outside the firm, you’ll naturally want to add value and assure your employers and employees that you are the right hire. But based on my work helping executives transitioning into new organizations, I’ve discovered common traps new executives tend to fall in, even as they try to solve problems, make decisions, and improve the company. Fortunately, there are ways to sidestep these traps so you can assimilate successfully into your new organization.
David Hain's insight:

You may feel triumphant on Day 1 - but most of the company didn't have a say in your hiring!

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Managing for the Long Term

Managing for the Long Term | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The success of a leader has more to do with intrinsic motivation, skills, capabilities, and character than with whether his or her pay is tied to shareholder returns. If leaders are poorly equipped for the job, giving them more “skin in the game” will not improve the situation and may even make it worse. (Part of the problem with equity-based pay is that it conflates executive skill and luck.) The challenges of corporate leadership—crafting strategy, building a strong organization, developing and motivating talented executives, and allocating resources among the corporation’s various businesses for present and future returns—are significant. In focusing on incentives as the key to ensuring effective leadership, agency theory diminishes these challenges and the importance of developing individuals who can meet them.
David Hain's insight:

Time to move the needle on leadership/CEO horizons?

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 11, 5:56 PM

This is what I and many others have been saying for years. You will notice that  the gap is widening in every element.

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Organizational Evolution: Are you ready? - Leadership & Change Magazine

Organizational Evolution: Are you ready? - Leadership & Change Magazine | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

This fascinating perspective is painted by Frederic Laloux, a management consultant who quit consulting to research which organizations would energize him (instead of exhaust and disengage). He connects the dots and paints the bigger picture in his book: Reinventing Organizations. We’re approaching our fifth big paradigm change. We and our organizations are already evolving toward the new era…. Self-management, wholeness, and evolutionary purpose seem to be the three key breakthroughs that “new organizations” offer – according to Frederic Laloux.

 

 The organizational stages during human development resembled wolf packs (tribal phase), armies (agrarian phase), machines (industrial age), and families (post-modern information age).What’s next? We’re on the brink of the fifth major leap in human development. Will we evolve to the Authentic Age, or the Integral Age? We long to self-manage, to be WHO we are at work (not just the narrow rational, masculine, professional ego side of ourselves) and to find an evolutionary purpose (why are we here, contributing to this organization’s purpose that makes a difference in the world?).

David Hain's insight:

Good summary of Fred Laloux's work on the future of organisations in this excellent online magazine from @MarcelaBremer.

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 5, 10:15 AM

Thanks for sharing David Hain.

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You can’t change what you don’t notice.

You can’t change what you don’t notice. | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Early in January, I hit a wall.

Over the previous year, I had set out to completely reshape The Energy Project, the company I run, and change is rarely easy. At mid-year, I got drawn into the presidential campaign, and it consumed a great deal of my time and emotional energy. And then, on January 1, my younger brother suffered a severe stroke. On the weekends, I began to travel back and forth between New York and Boston to be with him and his family.   

All this came back to me as I created a series of videos for LinkedIn about managing personal energy – and served as a humbling reminder of just how connected personal renewal is to performance, not just for our clients, but also for me. 
David Hain's insight:

More on the importance of managing personal energy and attention!

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donhornsby's curator insight, May 5, 9:12 AM
My most important lesson? You can’t change what you don’t notice. And you won’t notice until you make noticing a priority.
 
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 5, 10:26 AM

Paying attention to details is the single most important characteristic of a leader but right behind it is how you deal with what you see, positive or negative.

 

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, May 5, 12:37 PM
Spending a little time each day reflecting and meditating on our lives is essential. I did this and took up Yoga towards the end of my teaching career, when it was very stressful. It made a huge difference. Slowly, mindfulness crept into my daily teaching practices.
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The psychological importance of wasting time

The psychological importance of wasting time | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
There will always be an endless list of chores to complete and work to do, and a culture of relentless productivity tells us to get to it right away and feel terribly guilty about any time wasted. But the truth is, a life spent dutifully responding to emails is a dull one indeed. And “wasted” time is, in fact, highly fulfilling and necessary.
Don’t believe me? Take it from the creator of “Inbox Zero.” As Oliver Burkeman reports in The Guardian, Merlin Mann was commissioned to write a book about his streamlined email system. Two years later, he abandoned the project and instead posted a (since deleted) blog post on how he’d spent so long focusing on how to spend time well, he’d ended up missing valuable moments with his daughter.
The problem comes when we spend so long frantically chasing productivity, we refuse to take real breaks. We put off sleeping in, or going for a long walk, or reading by the window—and, even if we do manage time away from the grind, it comes with a looming awareness of the things we should be doing, and so the experience is weighed down by guilt.
David Hain's insight:

As someone about to depart for a long weekend in glorious West Wales, this article made sense to me!

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Henry Mintzberg about some Half-Truths of Management 

Henry Mintzberg about some Half-Truths of Management  | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
WE LIVE IN TIMES OF GREAT CHANGE

Have you heard this before—say in the last hour? Did you know that when a laptop detects a CEO about to type a speech, it automatically enters: “We live in times of great change.”  Why bother the CEO to type it again, since just about every management speech in the past few decades has begun with this line. That never changes.

Do we really live in times of great change? Look around and tell me what’s changed fundamentally. Your food, your furniture, your friends, your fixations? Are you wearing a tie, or high heels? How come: because you always have? How about your car? Under the hood is probably a four-cycle, internal combustion engine. That was in the Model T Ford.

When you got dressed this morning, did you say to yourself: “If we live in times of great change, how come we are still buttoning buttons?” (from Wikipedia: “Functional buttons with buttonholes for fastening or closing clothes appeared first in Germany in the 13th century”.)

What’s my point? That we only notice what is changing, and most things are not. Of course, some things are changing: information technology, most notably. Zap, I hit a few keys and Wikipedia tells me about buttons. I hope you have taken notice of this new technology, because it is rendering great changes.  But I hope that you are also taking notice of all the things that are not changing, because they are no less important. Managing change without managing continuity is anarchy.
David Hain's insight:

Don't be lazy about the management sound bytes!

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Time to move

Time to move | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
These technologies have the ability now to solve pressing problems in business and other types of institutions. They can make scarce knowledge more widely available, and make fast and accurate decisions. They work at all hours of the day and night. They can greatly augment our human capabilities for perceiving our environments and undertaking decisions and actions based on them. We cannot afford to be complacent as we plan our own futures in the workplace, but we also cannot afford to ignore the opportunities that cognitive technologies present.
David Hain's insight:

A new piece of jargon to me - cognitive technologies! But the article makes sense...

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 28, 11:47 AM

Interesting insights.  Thanks for sharing David Hain.

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How to Overcome the Fear of “Putting Yourself Out There"

How to Overcome the Fear of “Putting Yourself Out There" | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The long-overdue conversation about adversity and resilience launched by Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant’s book, Option B, has caused many of us to think about life’s toughest issues: mortality, bereavement, chronic illness, and so on.

Yet it’s also gotten me thinking about smaller scale forms of adversity, and how we best face them. Today, I want to write about just one of these. It is a challenge I know to be faced by so many people: of being driven to create, but afraid to share those creations with the world.
David Hain's insight:

The excellent Susan Cain on finding our courage. Glad she did! 

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Building Trust while Cutting Costs

Building Trust while Cutting Costs | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Restructuring initiatives can have a debilitating effect on the hearts and minds of employees, affecting those who stay as well as those who are let go. In our work with dozens of organizations implementing sweeping cost-cutting programs, we have observed firsthand the turmoil that employees experience — and how frequently their needs are forgotten during the crucial work of planning for the transformation.

But what if the restructuring were more than a slash and burn? What if it appealed to hope instead of fear? What if it not only promised, but actually delivered, a stronger company and a better place to work? Cost management is effective only when it leads to a less sclerotic, more aspirational enterprise — one without suffocating bureaucracy or micromanagement, in which initiative and entrepreneurship are encouraged and rewarded, internal processes serve the customers and employees instead of “the process” itself, and the company outperforms the competition consistently. If the restructuring doesn’t help the company get stronger — if it doesn’t lead to a better way of working for everyone in it — then it probably wasn’t worth conducting the exercise in the first place, because the effects won’t last.
David Hain's insight:

Nearly every top team I work with faces this problem paradox - slash and grow, simultaneously!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 27, 11:46 AM

The difficulty with cutting costs arise when the cuts are arbitrary or panic driven rather than thoughtful and logic.  Too often the former come to play.

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Management Lessons from One Hospital’s Dramatic Turnaround

Management Lessons from One Hospital’s Dramatic Turnaround | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Assuming the leadership of a 165-year-old institution that appears to be in long-term decline can be a daunting task — especially if it faces deep-rooted financial challenges, eroding market position, declines in quality, a fading reputation, an aging physical infrastructure, and an influential cadre of veterans satisfied with “good enough.”

This was the challenge Robert Grossman, M.D., faced when he became the dean and CEO of NYU Langone Medical Center in July 2007. Over the past 10 years, however, rather than preside over further decline, Grossman has led the institution, which comprises both NYU School of Medicine and NYU hospitals, to an impressive comeback.

The dramatic turnaround engineered by Grossman offers lessons for any manager seeking to overcome chronic underperformance. Confronting an entrenched, entitled workforce — the tenured faculty in an academic medical center — he and his team succeeded in raising performance standards throughout the enterprise, while simultaneously increasing commitment levels. The result has been significant improvements across key financial, performance, regulatory, and quality indicators:
David Hain's insight:

"building belief in the vision was critical..." - useful case study on successful turnaround programme.

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The halo effect, and other managerial delusions 

The halo effect, and other managerial delusions  | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Rather than succumb to the hyperbole and false promises found in so much management writing, business strategists would do far better to improve their powers of critical thinking. Wise executives should be able to think clearly about the quality of research claims and to detect some of the egregious errors that pervade the business world. Indeed, the capacity for critical thinking is an important asset for any business strategist—one that allows the executive to cut through the clutter and to discard the delusions, embracing instead a more realistic understanding of business success and failure.

As a first step, it’s important to identify some of the misperceptions and delusions commonly found in the business world. Then, using these insights, we might replace flawed thinking with a more acute method of approaching strategic decisions.
David Hain's insight:

Executives with halos are not generally a useful combination!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 25, 6:43 PM

Awesome article.

Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.