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How to Recapture the Art of Asking Questions - TanveerNaseer.com

How to Recapture the Art of Asking Questions - TanveerNaseer.com | Coaching jeugdsport | Scoop.it
A look at what businesses can do to encourage an environment where employees can feel free to ask questions about how their business functions.
Jeugdsportcoach's insight:

Replace "employees" by "players" and "entrepeneurs" by "coaches" and you have here a powerfull article/tool to help grow your team and your athletes.

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How To Prevent Overuse Injuries In Youth Sports | Metrifit

How To Prevent Overuse Injuries In Youth Sports | Metrifit | Coaching jeugdsport | Scoop.it
Most parents and coaches have heard of the growing problem of overuse injuries in youth sports but few are probably aware of the startling statistics. In the U.S..
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Randy Bauer's curator insight, June 2, 2013 1:51 PM

The number one cause of increased overuse injuries in youth sports is related to exposure to potential injury. This may be in the form of practice or participation.

Youth sports has become a business. As a physical therapist I am treating and managing youth injuries frequently. Some of these injuries are the result of repetitive stress, or overuse, and some are from acute trauma(example; ACL injury, ankle sprains).

One of the problems that exists is not just the frequency of play in a week with the combination of practice and competition, often this may require playing 2-3 games per day, or 4-6 games in a weekend. Research suggests that being exposed to practice and game in hours that is greater that ones age increased the risk of injury 2/3 times.

The other issue is the continuous play over a year. Youngsters are becoming specialized at an early age. This will include more play and games, thus exposure, over the course of a year. There is little time for rest and recovery. There is also little time to prepare with off-season strength and conditioning, specific to the individual's needs based on their rate of growth and maturity, physical and mental.

There must be time to develop as an athlete. This includes increasing movement and fitness requirements outside their sport, and how this can have cross-benefit for the sports that they engage. For example, a soccer athlete can benefit from engaging in track and field, and individual sport where speed and specific training would be beneficial to their soccer fitness. In track there would be less exposure to ankle and knee injuries due to less contact and cutting activity.

The bottom line is that if we want our young athletes to continue healthy participation through youth sports, and potentially to collegiate athletics, we must take care of the physical and psychological well-being through carefully designed, annual programs that are not just about how important the next game is, but taking a look at the big picture of Our Kid's future. Less can mean more. www.bauerpt.com 

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Long-term athlete development: Foundations & challenges

Long-term athlete development: Foundations & challenges | Coaching jeugdsport | Scoop.it
Here is a very interesting discussion by Ross Tucker & Jonathan Dugas www.sportsscientists.com on LTAD ref a presentation to IRFU coaches last weekend. Long-term athlete development: Foundation...
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TotalCoach Introduces a Digital Playbook for Basketball on iPad - DigitalJournal.com (press release)

TotalCoach Introduces a Digital Playbook for Basketball on iPad DigitalJournal.com (press release) By providing a better coaching experience, TotalCoach promotes LTAD (Long-Term Athlete Development) and creates a life-long love of sport in young...
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Why Practice Alone Does Not Make Perfect - Lifehacker Australia

Why Practice Alone Does Not Make Perfect - Lifehacker Australia | Coaching jeugdsport | Scoop.it
Why Practice Alone Does Not Make Perfect
Lifehacker Australia
The deliberate practice framework proposed by Swedish psychologist K.

Via Luis Valdes
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Mike Margolies's curator insight, May 29, 2013 4:08 PM

This article provides an interesting perspective on practice. I will always caution people on the word practice of course. We have always taught that it's perfect practice which makes perfect. I have reconsidered this not just because of the research included in this paper, but because what we do to players in expecting them to practice perfectly. If we learn most effectively through our failures, how could perfect practice make us better. I think this may go to the basis of the research here. How our minds use the information from failure helps us perform at a higher level due to cognative memory function.

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The Science of Willpower: Kelly McGonigal at TEDxBayArea

Stanford psychologist Kelly McGonigal will describe the biggest myths of willpower and how rethinking self-control can help you reach your goals and make dif...

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Sports for Life - Long Term Athlete Development LTAD

Sports for Life - Long Term Athlete Development (LTAD) is the model used to develop physical literacy from grass-root community programs to the Olympics. The...
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