Coaching in Education for learning and leadership
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15 Things You Must Give Up to Be Happy Again

15 Things You Must Give Up to Be Happy Again | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Giving up doesn’t always mean you’re weak; sometimes it simply means you are strong enough and smart enough to let go.

Via John Michel, donhornsby
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John Michel's curator insight, February 18, 2014 10:31 AM
Life is a tapestry of people weaving in and out of your life, people come into your life for a reason, a season or a lifetime. Everyone has something to offer and share with you. Imagine treating every person you encounter, no matter how fleeting, as an intriguing story waiting to be told. But the story can only be told if someone asks to hear it. Will you ask?
donhornsby's curator insight, February 18, 2014 3:09 PM

The article contains a great list to review today...or any other day. Including:

 

Excessive pride. – Get out of your own way.  Stop judging everyone and everything.  Pride is one of the greatest enemies to your happiness and growth.  Open your mind before you open your mouth.  Don’t hate what you don’t know.  The mind is like a parachute; it doesn’t work when it’s closed.  Or as C.S. Lewis so profoundly put it, “A proud person is always looking down on things and other people; and, of course, as long as you are looking down, you cannot see something beautiful that is above you.”
Jayne Albiston's curator insight, February 18, 2014 10:00 PM

Wow! Absolutely one of the best lists I have ever read to inspire me and hopefully you to make the most of every day, to keep striving for our goals, to stay strong, to be grateful and to never ever give up.

The last paragraph is such a strong quote:

Remember, you are the customer of a bank called Time.  Every morning it credits you with 86,400 seconds.  Every night it writes off, as a loss, whatever remainder you have failed to invest to good purpose.  It carries over no balance.  It allows no overdraft.  Each day it opens a new account for you with the same deposit of 86,400 seconds.  Each night it burns the remains of the day.  If you fail to use the day’s deposits, the loss is yours. 

 

So let's invest in today and make the most of now - every moment counts!

Coaching in Education for learning and leadership
Focus on coaching for leadership and change in K-12 education
Curated by Les Howard
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10 New Truths Great Leaders Know That Most People Don't

10 New Truths  Great Leaders Know That Most People Don't | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Leadership isn't the same field that it was even a decade ago. Here's a map to the new landscape.
Via Bobby Dillard, Wise Leader™
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The Pendulum Is Not Swinging Back - e-Learning Feeds

The Pendulum Is Not Swinging Back - e-Learning Feeds | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
When I first started teaching a veteran teacher told me, “If you stick around long enough, you’ll see everything come and go and come back again. The pendu
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Infographic: Does Coaching Really Work? The Benefits of Coaching Your Clients Should Know!

Infographic: Does Coaching Really Work? The Benefits of Coaching Your Clients Should Know! | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Scroll down the page for the full version of this infographic As part of our focus on "The Benefits of Coaching", Tom Casano has compiled helpful statistic

Via Ariana Amorim
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9 Reasons Why Hitting Rock Bottom Will Make You Stronger

9 Reasons Why Hitting Rock Bottom Will Make You Stronger | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it

Maybe your business has failed or your venture gone off track. 


Maybe you were supposed to be the next Steve Jobs, but it's all gone bad. For whatever reason, you find yourself in a place you never imagined--rock bottom. But failure is not fatal and rock bottom is not forever, unless you make it so. There are very important lessons to learn when you've hit rock bottom. Here are nine of the most important:


Via donhornsby
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donhornsby's curator insight, June 27, 9:30 AM
I needed to read this today. I think you do as well.

(From the article):  Rock bottom can become the solid foundation on which you can rebuild your life. Whatever life gives you, even if it hurts a lot, be strong. Remember, strong walls may shake but they never collapse. You were given this life, this pain, this struggle, so work to keep yourself strong enough to make it through.
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Mutiny on the ice: Earnest Shackleton and the trust equation

Mutiny on the ice: Earnest Shackleton and the trust equation | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
How is it that Shackleton managed to provide the leadership to overcome mutiny and save all of his men despite the desperate nature of their predicament? 

What can we take from it that would be useful in business today?  I believe it came down to trust - the trust that Shackleton’s men had built in him, and the environment of trust that he created in his team.

There is a Trust Equation defined in the book The Trusted Advisor that shows the elements needed for trust to exist. 

It’s this: Trust = (Credibility x Reliability x Intimacy)/Self Orientation

Via David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, June 9, 6:09 AM

Meet the Trust Equation! How well does yours add up?

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Five Moments When Saying No Is Your Best Strategy

Five Moments When Saying No Is Your Best Strategy | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Most successful leaders have little difficulty saying no to a losing deal, to a project that’s wasting money, or to a request that doesn’t align with their priorities. But these same leaders can find it very uncomfortable to speak up when their concerns are less cut-and-dried or when their organization is hell-bent on pursuing a plan. In certain situations, it can feel politically risky to hesitate or ask too many questions. Even with their direct reports, many leaders find themselves putting off the difficult conversations needed to address issues such as drifting standards, inappropriate behavior, or emerging bad habits.

But, as difficult as it can be, saying no is often the key to effective leadership. Without the ability to push back when needed, you run the risk of “commitment drift”: promises made to customers or employees, or to promote safety, specific values, financial discipline, or social and environmental responsibility are eroded incrementally, without anyone really stopping to think about the consequences. As Joseph Fuller and Michael C. Jensen pointed out in their 2002 paper “Just Say No to Wall Street: Putting a Stop to the Earnings Game,” saying no to such dysfunctional momentum can be your best strategy for helping your company succeed as well as living your values.

Via David Hain, donhornsby
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David Hain's curator insight, June 8, 3:46 AM

If your gut says no, it probably should prompt you to say no - or at least explore your concerns openly!

donhornsby's curator insight, June 8, 10:49 AM
(From the article): Being prepared to recognize and act on these moments of truth makes it less likely that you will blow by critical decision points without giving them the attention they deserve. The fact is, it only gets harder to speak up if you wait. And, as you practice saying no or raising questions constructively, you increase your ability to exert a positive influence on your organization.
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UMaine Professor: Writing Boosts Performance of Maine’s Student-Athletes

UMaine Professor: Writing Boosts Performance of Maine’s Student-Athletes | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Tennis great Serena Williams, Olympic gold medal skier Mikaela Shiffren and Mets outfielder Carlos Delgado might play vastly different sports, but they
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Amber Harrison's curator insight, June 3, 12:02 PM

The perfect article for any athlete to "reflect" upon in order to enhance overall performance!

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15 Highly Effective Hypnotic Power Words To Influence Others – 2nd Edition

15 Highly Effective Hypnotic Power Words To Influence Others – 2nd Edition | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Discover 15 highly effective hypnotic power words to ethically influence others and improve communication skills (recommended by hypnotist Igor Ledochowski)

Via Ariana Amorim
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Feeling Overwhelmed? Remember "RAIN" - Mindful

Feeling Overwhelmed? Remember "RAIN" - Mindful | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Over the last several decades, through my work with tens of thousands of clients and meditation students, I’ve come to see the pain of perceived deficiency as epidemic. It’s like we’re in a trance that causes us to see ourselves as unworthy. Yet, I have seen in my own life, and with countless others, that we can awaken from this trance through practicing mindfulness and self-compassion. We can come to trust the goodness and purity of our hearts.

In order to flower, self-compassion depends on honest, direct contact with our own vulnerability. Compassion fully blossoms when we actively offer care to ourselves. To help people address feelings of insecurity and unworthiness, I often introduce mindfulness and compassion through a meditation I call the RAIN of Self-Compassion. The acronym RAIN, first coined about 20 years ago by Michele McDonald, is an easy-to-remember tool for practicing mindfulness.

Via David Hain, Wise Leader™
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David Hain's curator insight, June 1, 9:23 AM

Here is a RAIN shower to be welcomed, through the power of mindfulness! Useful EQ practice for when things get on top of us.

Karine Buriez's curator insight, June 2, 8:29 AM
Une puissante évocation de la pluie...RAIN en anglais.
Amber Harrison's curator insight, June 3, 12:15 PM

When dealing with arousal, stress, and anxiety we sometimes encounter the, "when it rains, it pours" mindset.  It's ok to have rain in life, it's just a matter of knowing how to deal with that R.A.I.N

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Listening Is an Overlooked Leadership Tool

Listening Is an Overlooked Leadership Tool | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
“What do you think?”

I ask this question a lot. My team knows that when they come to me with a question, this is likely the question I’ll come back with first. Sometimes I even preface it with, “I don’t know.” As leaders in our organizations, it’s up to us to coach colleagues and our employees through finding that answer. More often than not, when I ask this question, my team has a better answer than I do — or one that I hadn’t thought about before.

It can be a powerful technique, especially if there is no single right answer – a situation that will be familiar to anyone doing leading-edge work. But it only works in an organization that values listening.

Via David Hain, donhornsby
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David Hain's curator insight, May 27, 7:09 AM

Listening matters - here's the why and some hows!

donhornsby's curator insight, May 27, 8:51 AM
So how can we listen more? 

Three suggestions to try this week: 

 Look people in the eye. Sherry Turkle, a professor at MIT who studies the psychology of online connectivity, wisely wrote in her recent book Reclaiming Conversation, “We face a significant choice. It is not about giving up our phones but about using them with greater intention. Conversation is there for us to reclaim.” Put down your phone when you’re in meetings. Close your laptop. See if you’re more energized about work and the people with whom you work. 

 Create space in your day. Manage your calendar and stop booking yourself out the entire day. Can someone on your team be part of that meeting? Does it need to be an hour, or can 30 minutes suffice? Give yourself time for reflection and space throughout the day, so that when you are talking with someone, you can give them your full attention. 

 Ask more questions. Next time a colleague or employee asks for advice, make sure you’re listening and understand the situation. Then, before answering, ask a question. Clarify what they really need — usually it’s just validation that their thinking is on the right track.
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 28, 10:27 AM

Totally agree.

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Coaching and the GROW Model

This is a short and breezy introduction to coaching and the GROW model - with some great jazz to hurry it along.
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Amber Harrison's curator insight, June 3, 12:09 PM

A very cool snip-it of the G.R.O.W model and coaching strategies!

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Why Do Teachers Need Instructional Coaches?

Why Do Teachers Need Instructional Coaches? | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Instructional Coaching

According to Jim Knight, someone I work with as an instructional coaching trainer, up to 90% of what teachers learn alongside coaches will be retained. This means, that unlike traditional professional development where Knight's research shows that teachers lose 90% of what they learn, coaching can provide an enormous impact.

Knight's work is highly respected, and is highly respectful of teachers. Instructional coaching, in Knight's research and philosophy, is about working in partnership with teachers where the learning is reciprocal on the part of the teacher and coach. After all, we can learn a lot from one another.

In order for coaching to work properly, the school has to have a climate conducive to learning, which means that there needs to be a balance between risk-taking and rule following.  It also means that teachers need to be able to trust that the coaching-teaching relationship will be confidential, something Knight believes both parties should come to an agreement on before the coaching relationship even begins.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Coaching

 


Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 12, 3:36 AM

Instructional Coaching


According to Jim Knight, someone I work with as an instructional coaching trainer, up to 90% of what teachers learn alongside coaches will be retained. This means, that unlike traditional professional development where Knight's research shows that teachers lose 90% of what they learn, coaching can provide an enormous impact.

Knight's work is highly respected, and is highly respectful of teachers. Instructional coaching, in Knight's research and philosophy, is about working in partnership with teachers where the learning is reciprocal on the part of the teacher and coach. After all, we can learn a lot from one another.

In order for coaching to work properly, the school has to have a climate conducive to learning, which means that there needs to be a balance between risk-taking and rule following.  It also means that teachers need to be able to trust that the coaching-teaching relationship will be confidential, something Knight believes both parties should come to an agreement on before the coaching relationship even begins.


Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Coaching




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The Power of Small Wins

The Power of Small Wins | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Want to truly engage your workers? Help them see their own progress.
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Six Habits Of People Who Know How To Bring Out The Best In Others

Six Habits Of People Who Know How To Bring Out The Best In Others | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
As a leader, the most important part of your job isn't your results. Your job is to inspire your employees' results. Here's how.

Via donhornsby
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donhornsby's curator insight, June 29, 10:01 AM
(From the article) Being able to bring out the best in others is a skill that involves just 10% natural inclination; the other 90% has to be deliberate, says Wellins: "It can’t be learned by listening to a lecture or reading examples," he says. "It needs to be practiced, reinforced, and used day to day." Here are six of their daily habits:
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The Lost Art of Thinking in Large Organizations

The Lost Art of Thinking in Large Organizations | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
If you ask managers in a large organization to approach a strategic business problem, their focus often quickly narrows to proposing solutions. When asked why, many respond that they don’t have time to think.

How did we arrive in a state where managers do not recognize that thinking is part of their job? The answer reflects a relentless focus on execution in many large companies. A company becomes big by finding a successful business model — and then scaling it massively. This necessitates building a finely tuned system with highly standardized processes. To get promoted in such an environment requires an almost singular focus on execution. In other words, it requires action more than thinking. However, once executives are promoted to a senior level, these new business leaders must be able to think strategically. Ironically, the very skills in execution that led to their promotions often make these executives ill-equipped for their new roles, since their strategy thinking muscles have withered from disuse.

Via David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, June 27, 5:55 AM

Is a bias for action causing a deficit of broader thinking in your organisation? I see it all the time in my coaching work.

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To Seize the Future, Create a Leadership Circle

To Seize the Future, Create a Leadership Circle | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Senior leaders need to talk to each other.

Via donhornsby
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donhornsby's curator insight, June 27, 9:18 AM
(From the article): A leadership circle is a unique engagement of members of the corporate family. It is a thinking-intensive forum created to expand horizons and raise new possibilities. One business unit director for the media company commented to me that, after the first few meetings of the leadership circle, discussions were happening that had been previously missing from all past strategic dialogues. “We simply had never had a forum for having such discussion among peers from across the organization,” he shared with me one day, “and once we got started, the benefits became evident to all of us.” With a universal need for companies to find new ways to either take existing corporate capabilities and move them in new directions or to start developing the capabilities required to keep the company moving forward, forming circles may be the best way to start solving that need.
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Is there an Inflation of Coaches?

Is there an Inflation of Coaches? | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it

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Tessa Dagnely's curator insight, June 25, 9:46 AM
De quoi être éclairé sur ce qu'est et n'est pas un coach...toujours d'actualité bien que l'article ait 2 ans. Il se réfère à l'ICF, fédération internationale de coaching, mais sachez qu'il y a deux associations internationales de coachs, la seconde est la European Mentoring and Coaching Council - http://www.emccouncil.org/eu/en/ - qui a renvoie aussi aux sites nationaux.
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Why Every CEO Needs a Coach

Why Every CEO Needs a Coach | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Every Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is "on the stage" the majority of his or her work life but needs pre-performance quiet and confidential time to be creative, bounce their ideas off someone in a safe environment, and explore the unintended consequences of their future actions.  Engaging in a personal coaching conversation is a refreshing opportunity where the CEO can be completely open and creative in a confidential and safe place.

When asked what was the best advice he ever received, Eric Schmidt, Chairman and CEO of Google, recognized it was from John Doerr, who in 2001 said, "My advice to you is to have a coach."  Schmidt initially resented the advice, because after all, he was a CEO.  He was pretty experienced.  Why would he need a coach? 

Via David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, June 9, 6:14 AM

If it works for Eric Schmidt...! Why you should think about hiring coach.

donhornsby's curator insight, June 9, 10:46 AM
(From the article): I often hear myself telling my coach that it’s painful sometimes to have to be brutally honest with myself and as he always explains, it’s best to be honest with your coach as they are a sound board for you. Let’s think about this concept for a moment. If I didn’t have a coach then this conversation would be going on internally, with my inner self talk. As we all know inner self talk goes round and round and doesn’t actually go anywhere except in a negative energy field. It spirals down into a conversation of justifying and explaining why I shouldn’t do something. Controlling our inner self talk takes great skill.
Ian Berry's curator insight, June 10, 8:45 PM
Lot of wisdom in this article. For me it describes mentoring more than coaching. I know some great business coaches and respect their work. I also know that the term is somewhat tainted because of the zillions of people putting up a shingle. I prefer being regarded as a mentor which is how my clients see me
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8 Ways Smart People Use Failure to Their Advantage

8 Ways Smart People Use Failure to Their Advantage | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Failure is an inevitable part of life, but smart people know how to make it work for them.

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How to Tackle Your Blind Spots | Workforce Development | Training Industry

One of the toughest challenges in personal and corporate development is identifying blind spots and figuring out what to do about them. This is as true for coaches and corporate leaders as it is for any of the team members they direct.
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Why You Should Focus on Coaching Millennials Instead of Managing Them

Why You Should Focus on Coaching Millennials Instead of Managing Them | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
One of the founders of IBM's new 'Millennial Corps' task force explains why bosses need to foster a culture of collaboration.
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4 Brilliant Things That Happen When We PAUSE

4 Brilliant Things That Happen When We PAUSE | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
If you are a modern-age professional, we expect you to be self-aware and reflect. At its best, this self-awareness is present in every moment. You engage with another person, and you are at the same time aware of the quality of your engagement and the choices you make. I call this ability double-tracking. In the moment, and watchful of the moment, all at once.

Reflection, however, tends to happen in a pause. The pause is the moment in-between active engagement. Often only milliseconds long. But whoa – what glorious things happen in a pause.

Via David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, May 31, 5:13 AM

Pressing the pause button purposefully! Pause for 2 minutes to read this insightful stuff from @AchimNowak!

Joey-David Ovey's curator insight, June 5, 12:33 PM
In an age when we talk too much, pausing becomes so powerful.
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For Delegation to Work, It Has to Come with Coaching

For Delegation to Work, It Has to Come with Coaching | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Simply handing off a project isn’t enough.
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5 Habits Of Great Leaders

5 Habits Of Great Leaders | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it

The habits of the best leaders are well documented. They’re self-aware. They admit mistakes. They take care of, recognize, and communicate well with their teams.

But what do these inspirational people do on their own time? What goes on behind the scenes that helps them be so effective on a day-to-day basis?

 

"I’ve definitely noticed some things that great leaders tend to do," says Danielle Harlan, founder and CEO of The Center for Advancing Leadership and Human Potential, an organization that helps individuals and organizations maximize their impact. And the things they do behind the scenes make all the difference when it comes to their professional leadership ability, she says. Here are five such common habits.


Via The Learning Factor, Kevin Watson, donhornsby
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Luciano Alibrandi's curator insight, May 10, 3:21 AM

What makes a great leader? Leaders have a purpose, they have a sharp focus, they inspire their teams. They show the way for others to follow. They genuinely push each individual to give his/her best. Great leaders share some common traits. Here's five of them. Well written article

donhornsby's curator insight, May 11, 8:33 AM
(From the Article): Harlan notes that the most effective leaders she works with have personal interests and commitments outside of work. They know what works for them to recharge their batteries, whether it’s hiking and spending time outdoors or reading a good book—and they take the time to do those things to keep themselves sharp, including getting enough sleep, she says. In addition to exercising to stay in shape, the benefits of which are well known, Novak takes time in the morning to write down three things for which he is grateful. This helps him manage his "mood elevator," he says. Novak says we make our worst decisions when we're angry and resentful, but make our best decisions when we're grateful. When he feels his mood elevator going to the wrong places, he knows it’s time to take better care of himself or address what’s bothering him.
Jean-Guy Frenette's curator insight, May 13, 9:05 AM
PDGLead
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The Incredible Thing We Do During Conversations

The Incredible Thing We Do During Conversations | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
When we take turns speaking, we chime in after a culturally universal short gap.
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