Coaching in Education for learning and leadership
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Skills Converged > Why Knowledge of Andragogy Can Improve Training

Skills Converged > Why Knowledge of Andragogy Can Improve Training | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it

"Andragogy is essentially the science of understanding lifelong adult learning. The theory was developed by Malcolm Knowles in 1960s and the term has since come to name the field of adult learning."


Via Ariana Amorim
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Coaching in Education for learning and leadership
Focus on coaching for leadership and change in K-12 education
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The Psychology of Teamwork: The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teams

The Psychology of Teamwork: The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teams | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Imagine you’re a VIP admitted to a hospital with a serious heart condition. You need a lifesaving operation and, because of your wealth and influence, you are given the option of having a world renowned surgeon flown in to operate on you.

In those circumstances we’d all go for the star performer over the resident medical team, right?
Maybe not.

Robert Huckman and Gary Pisano from Harvard Business School challenged the status of freelancing experts by empirically measuring the success rates of more than 200 cardiac surgeons working across 43 different hospitals.

They specifically examined the success rates (patient survival rates) of highly experienced freelancers versus more bonded surgical teams.

After analyzing more than 38,000 procedures they found the performance of individual heart specialists did improve significantly with practice and experience (one for the prima donnas).

But it was only at the hospital where they did most of their work.

When the same surgeons left their usual teams to work at different hospitals their success rates returned to baseline.

It seems working with a bonded team of colleagues (doctors, nurses, anesthesiologists) helps to develop interactive routines that harness the unique talents of each team member.

The authors concluded that elite performance is not as portable as previously thought and is more a function of the “familiarity that a surgeon develops with the assets of a given organization”- a nice way of saying stars only shine due to their colleagues.

Via David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, September 8, 3:34 AM

Is everyone on the bus? Are they going to the same place? Are they working together? Handy teamwork ready reckoner!

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To Find Success, Psychologists Recommend More Listening and Connecting

To Find Success, Psychologists Recommend More Listening and Connecting | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Emotional intelligence is a people skill that is not only necessary but powerful when it comes to connecting and engaging with others.
Via Rami Kantari, Create Wise Leader
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Christine Lee's curator insight, September 3, 7:02 AM
More reasons why we should listen more
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7 Steps in leading big conversations

7 Steps in leading big conversations | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
One of the conditions for major positive changes in any organisation or individuals is for everyone involved to face the truth and take an honest assessment of where he or she is now.

Via Ariana Amorim
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Ariana Amorim's curator insight, August 2, 1:16 PM
In organizations, big conversations matter. Here is one coach's steps for leading a big conversation plus some coaching questions that can help.
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Living By Questions, by Jane Hirshfield | DailyGood

Living By Questions, by Jane Hirshfield | DailyGood | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
"In times of darkness and direness, a good question can become a safety rope between you and your own sense of selfhood: A person who asks a question is not wholly undone by events. She is there to face them, to meet them. If you're asking a question, you still believe in a future. And in times that are placid and easy, a good question is a preventive against sleepwalking, a way to keep present the awakening question that's under all other questions: "What else, what more?" Jane Hirshfield, the award-winning poet and author of 'The Beauty,' explains a new way to examine your choices, keep your calm and "carabiner yourself to intimacy."

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Meaningful meetings: how can meetings be made better? | Nesta

Meaningful meetings: how can meetings be made better? | Nesta | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Many of us spend much of our time in meetings and at conferences. But too often these feel like a waste of time, or fail to make the most of the knowledge and experience of the people present.

Meetings have changed, with much more use of online tools, and a growing range of different meeting formats. But our sense is that meetings could be much better run and achieve better results.

This paper tries to help. It summarises some of what is known about how meetings work well or badly; it makes recommendations about how to make meetings better; and showcases some interesting recent innovations. It forms part of a larger research programme at Nesta on collective intelligence which is investigating how groups and organisations can make the most of their brains, and of the technologies they use.

We hope the paper will be helpful to anyone designing or running meetings of any kind, and that readers will contribute good examples, ideas and evidence which can be added into future versions.

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David Hain's curator insight, July 5, 4:58 AM

How much of your time do you spend in meetings? Some NESTA ideas on how to spend it more valuably!

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10 New Truths Great Leaders Know That Most People Don't

10 New Truths  Great Leaders Know That Most People Don't | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Leadership isn't the same field that it was even a decade ago. Here's a map to the new landscape.
Via Bobby Dillard, Create Wise Leader
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The Pendulum Is Not Swinging Back - e-Learning Feeds

The Pendulum Is Not Swinging Back - e-Learning Feeds | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
When I first started teaching a veteran teacher told me, “If you stick around long enough, you’ll see everything come and go and come back again. The pendu
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Infographic: Does Coaching Really Work? The Benefits of Coaching Your Clients Should Know!

Infographic: Does Coaching Really Work? The Benefits of Coaching Your Clients Should Know! | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Scroll down the page for the full version of this infographic As part of our focus on "The Benefits of Coaching", Tom Casano has compiled helpful statistic

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9 Reasons Why Hitting Rock Bottom Will Make You Stronger

9 Reasons Why Hitting Rock Bottom Will Make You Stronger | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it

Maybe your business has failed or your venture gone off track. 


Maybe you were supposed to be the next Steve Jobs, but it's all gone bad. For whatever reason, you find yourself in a place you never imagined--rock bottom. But failure is not fatal and rock bottom is not forever, unless you make it so. There are very important lessons to learn when you've hit rock bottom. Here are nine of the most important:


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donhornsby's curator insight, June 27, 9:30 AM
I needed to read this today. I think you do as well.

(From the article):  Rock bottom can become the solid foundation on which you can rebuild your life. Whatever life gives you, even if it hurts a lot, be strong. Remember, strong walls may shake but they never collapse. You were given this life, this pain, this struggle, so work to keep yourself strong enough to make it through.
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Mutiny on the ice: Earnest Shackleton and the trust equation

Mutiny on the ice: Earnest Shackleton and the trust equation | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
How is it that Shackleton managed to provide the leadership to overcome mutiny and save all of his men despite the desperate nature of their predicament? 

What can we take from it that would be useful in business today?  I believe it came down to trust - the trust that Shackleton’s men had built in him, and the environment of trust that he created in his team.

There is a Trust Equation defined in the book The Trusted Advisor that shows the elements needed for trust to exist. 

It’s this: Trust = (Credibility x Reliability x Intimacy)/Self Orientation

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David Hain's curator insight, June 9, 6:09 AM

Meet the Trust Equation! How well does yours add up?

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Five Moments When Saying No Is Your Best Strategy

Five Moments When Saying No Is Your Best Strategy | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Most successful leaders have little difficulty saying no to a losing deal, to a project that’s wasting money, or to a request that doesn’t align with their priorities. But these same leaders can find it very uncomfortable to speak up when their concerns are less cut-and-dried or when their organization is hell-bent on pursuing a plan. In certain situations, it can feel politically risky to hesitate or ask too many questions. Even with their direct reports, many leaders find themselves putting off the difficult conversations needed to address issues such as drifting standards, inappropriate behavior, or emerging bad habits.

But, as difficult as it can be, saying no is often the key to effective leadership. Without the ability to push back when needed, you run the risk of “commitment drift”: promises made to customers or employees, or to promote safety, specific values, financial discipline, or social and environmental responsibility are eroded incrementally, without anyone really stopping to think about the consequences. As Joseph Fuller and Michael C. Jensen pointed out in their 2002 paper “Just Say No to Wall Street: Putting a Stop to the Earnings Game,” saying no to such dysfunctional momentum can be your best strategy for helping your company succeed as well as living your values.

Via David Hain, donhornsby
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David Hain's curator insight, June 8, 3:46 AM

If your gut says no, it probably should prompt you to say no - or at least explore your concerns openly!

donhornsby's curator insight, June 8, 10:49 AM
(From the article): Being prepared to recognize and act on these moments of truth makes it less likely that you will blow by critical decision points without giving them the attention they deserve. The fact is, it only gets harder to speak up if you wait. And, as you practice saying no or raising questions constructively, you increase your ability to exert a positive influence on your organization.
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UMaine Professor: Writing Boosts Performance of Maine’s Student-Athletes

UMaine Professor: Writing Boosts Performance of Maine’s Student-Athletes | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Tennis great Serena Williams, Olympic gold medal skier Mikaela Shiffren and Mets outfielder Carlos Delgado might play vastly different sports, but they
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Amber Harrison's curator insight, June 3, 12:02 PM

The perfect article for any athlete to "reflect" upon in order to enhance overall performance!

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15 Highly Effective Hypnotic Power Words To Influence Others – 2nd Edition

15 Highly Effective Hypnotic Power Words To Influence Others – 2nd Edition | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Discover 15 highly effective hypnotic power words to ethically influence others and improve communication skills (recommended by hypnotist Igor Ledochowski)

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Where You Focus Will Become Your Greatest Area of Success. Here's Why

Where You Focus Will Become Your Greatest Area of Success. Here's Why | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Distractions are like road blocks. They divert you from the primary goal.
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10 Things People Who Are Mentally Tough Do

10 Things People Who Are Mentally Tough Do | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Mental strength involves more than just having willpower. It requires the habits of hard work and commitment.

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donhornsby's curator insight, September 2, 9:04 AM
Mentally tough people are the determined ones, the ones you put your money on to succeed. Start today to build the habits that will put you among them.
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Why Don't Educators Want to Be Coached?

Why Don't Educators Want to Be Coached? | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
In less than a week we will all be leaning in watching the Olympics. Thousands of athletes who have worked for years with their coach to improve in their sport. Why don't more teachers take advantage of the coaches they have in their buildings?
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How to Find and Engage Authentic Informal Leaders

How to Find and Engage Authentic Informal Leaders | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it

In a recent article, “10 Principles of Organizational Culture,” strategy+business highlighted how crucial it is to deploy authentic informal leaders (AILs). As the acronym suggests, AILs are not people in your organization who have been endowed with formal authority by title or by memo. Rather, they possess and exhibit certain leadership strengths such as the ability to do something important well and showing others how to do it (exemplars), or they demonstrate the skill of connecting people across the organization (networkers). Some AILs influence behavior by being the first to understand the value of a new trend (early adopters) or by instinctively associating peers’ positive feelings with day-to-day activities (pride builders). These strengths — which my colleagues at the Katzenbach Center and I refer to as “spikes” — can make AILs powerful allies in any transformation effort.


Via Roger Francis, Create Wise Leader
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Not All Teachers Want to Become Administrators

Not All Teachers Want to Become Administrators | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
On my first day of summer break, I ran into an acquaintance in the store. He asked how the school year went, what my plans were for the summer, an

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Six Habits Of People Who Know How To Bring Out The Best In Others

Six Habits Of People Who Know How To Bring Out The Best In Others | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
As a leader, the most important part of your job isn't your results. Your job is to inspire your employees' results. Here's how.

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donhornsby's curator insight, June 29, 10:01 AM
(From the article) Being able to bring out the best in others is a skill that involves just 10% natural inclination; the other 90% has to be deliberate, says Wellins: "It can’t be learned by listening to a lecture or reading examples," he says. "It needs to be practiced, reinforced, and used day to day." Here are six of their daily habits:
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The Lost Art of Thinking in Large Organizations

The Lost Art of Thinking in Large Organizations | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
If you ask managers in a large organization to approach a strategic business problem, their focus often quickly narrows to proposing solutions. When asked why, many respond that they don’t have time to think.

How did we arrive in a state where managers do not recognize that thinking is part of their job? The answer reflects a relentless focus on execution in many large companies. A company becomes big by finding a successful business model — and then scaling it massively. This necessitates building a finely tuned system with highly standardized processes. To get promoted in such an environment requires an almost singular focus on execution. In other words, it requires action more than thinking. However, once executives are promoted to a senior level, these new business leaders must be able to think strategically. Ironically, the very skills in execution that led to their promotions often make these executives ill-equipped for their new roles, since their strategy thinking muscles have withered from disuse.

Via David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, June 27, 5:55 AM

Is a bias for action causing a deficit of broader thinking in your organisation? I see it all the time in my coaching work.

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To Seize the Future, Create a Leadership Circle

To Seize the Future, Create a Leadership Circle | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Senior leaders need to talk to each other.

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donhornsby's curator insight, June 27, 9:18 AM
(From the article): A leadership circle is a unique engagement of members of the corporate family. It is a thinking-intensive forum created to expand horizons and raise new possibilities. One business unit director for the media company commented to me that, after the first few meetings of the leadership circle, discussions were happening that had been previously missing from all past strategic dialogues. “We simply had never had a forum for having such discussion among peers from across the organization,” he shared with me one day, “and once we got started, the benefits became evident to all of us.” With a universal need for companies to find new ways to either take existing corporate capabilities and move them in new directions or to start developing the capabilities required to keep the company moving forward, forming circles may be the best way to start solving that need.
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Is there an Inflation of Coaches?

Is there an Inflation of Coaches? | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it

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Tessa Dagnely's curator insight, June 25, 9:46 AM
De quoi être éclairé sur ce qu'est et n'est pas un coach...toujours d'actualité bien que l'article ait 2 ans. Il se réfère à l'ICF, fédération internationale de coaching, mais sachez qu'il y a deux associations internationales de coachs, la seconde est la European Mentoring and Coaching Council - http://www.emccouncil.org/eu/en/ - qui a renvoie aussi aux sites nationaux.
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Why Every CEO Needs a Coach

Why Every CEO Needs a Coach | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Every Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is "on the stage" the majority of his or her work life but needs pre-performance quiet and confidential time to be creative, bounce their ideas off someone in a safe environment, and explore the unintended consequences of their future actions.  Engaging in a personal coaching conversation is a refreshing opportunity where the CEO can be completely open and creative in a confidential and safe place.

When asked what was the best advice he ever received, Eric Schmidt, Chairman and CEO of Google, recognized it was from John Doerr, who in 2001 said, "My advice to you is to have a coach."  Schmidt initially resented the advice, because after all, he was a CEO.  He was pretty experienced.  Why would he need a coach? 

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David Hain's curator insight, June 9, 6:14 AM

If it works for Eric Schmidt...! Why you should think about hiring coach.

donhornsby's curator insight, June 9, 10:46 AM
(From the article): I often hear myself telling my coach that it’s painful sometimes to have to be brutally honest with myself and as he always explains, it’s best to be honest with your coach as they are a sound board for you. Let’s think about this concept for a moment. If I didn’t have a coach then this conversation would be going on internally, with my inner self talk. As we all know inner self talk goes round and round and doesn’t actually go anywhere except in a negative energy field. It spirals down into a conversation of justifying and explaining why I shouldn’t do something. Controlling our inner self talk takes great skill.
Ian Berry's curator insight, June 10, 8:45 PM
Lot of wisdom in this article. For me it describes mentoring more than coaching. I know some great business coaches and respect their work. I also know that the term is somewhat tainted because of the zillions of people putting up a shingle. I prefer being regarded as a mentor which is how my clients see me
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8 Ways Smart People Use Failure to Their Advantage

8 Ways Smart People Use Failure to Their Advantage | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Failure is an inevitable part of life, but smart people know how to make it work for them.

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How to Tackle Your Blind Spots | Workforce Development | Training Industry

One of the toughest challenges in personal and corporate development is identifying blind spots and figuring out what to do about them. This is as true for coaches and corporate leaders as it is for any of the team members they direct.
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