Coaching in Education for learning and leadership
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Coaching in Education for learning and leadership
Focus on coaching for leadership and change in K-12 education
Curated by Les Howard
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Six Thinking Hats: Looking at a Decision From All Points of View

Six Thinking Hats: Looking at a Decision From All Points of View | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it

What is your instinctive approach to decision making? If you're naturally optimistic, then chances are you don't always consider potential downsides. Similarly, if you're very cautious or have a risk-averse outlook, you might not focus on opportunities that could open up.

Often, the best decisions come from changing the way that you think about problems, and examining them from different viewpoints.

"Six Thinking Hats" can help you to look at problems from different perspectives, but one at a time, to avoid confusion from too many angles crowding your thinking.


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donhornsby's curator insight, March 22, 8:14 AM
Often, the best decisions come from changing the way that you think about problems and examining them from different viewpoints.
 
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Leadership and The Art of Effective Listening

Leadership and The Art of Effective Listening | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it

There is no leadership, personal or organizational, without listening. In fact, ability to truly listen (and not just hear) is the foundation of having a conversation, building trust, influencing others, resolving conflicts, driving your vision, building relationships, implementing change and...

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=listening

 


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Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, October 31, 2016 7:45 AM

Very interesting topic written attractively and with great content. I believe that
the relevance of this issue will generate more author's posts, which I will follow
assiduously. For those who speaks Portuguese or Spanish I also recommend the
site http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com to read about innovation and business trends.

Gonzalo Moreno's curator insight, November 1, 2016 8:44 AM
Leading starts with listening. Key idea, specially for the younger...
Brad Merrick's curator insight, November 2, 2016 4:50 PM
Being able to listen with focus and empathy is key, whereby those in our care feel supported and heard. In a world where everyone is so busy and time often seems to be the commodity that we have the least of, this diagram really serves to remind us that we need to listen constructively, suggest skilfully and try to understand the emotion of those we are engaging with in all that we do. Purposeful listening rather than just hearing is key.
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Six Habits Of People Who Know How To Bring Out The Best In Others

Six Habits Of People Who Know How To Bring Out The Best In Others | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
As a leader, the most important part of your job isn't your results. Your job is to inspire your employees' results. Here's how.

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donhornsby's curator insight, June 29, 2016 10:01 AM
(From the article) Being able to bring out the best in others is a skill that involves just 10% natural inclination; the other 90% has to be deliberate, says Wellins: "It can’t be learned by listening to a lecture or reading examples," he says. "It needs to be practiced, reinforced, and used day to day." Here are six of their daily habits:
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To Seize the Future, Create a Leadership Circle

To Seize the Future, Create a Leadership Circle | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Senior leaders need to talk to each other.

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donhornsby's curator insight, June 27, 2016 9:18 AM
(From the article): A leadership circle is a unique engagement of members of the corporate family. It is a thinking-intensive forum created to expand horizons and raise new possibilities. One business unit director for the media company commented to me that, after the first few meetings of the leadership circle, discussions were happening that had been previously missing from all past strategic dialogues. “We simply had never had a forum for having such discussion among peers from across the organization,” he shared with me one day, “and once we got started, the benefits became evident to all of us.” With a universal need for companies to find new ways to either take existing corporate capabilities and move them in new directions or to start developing the capabilities required to keep the company moving forward, forming circles may be the best way to start solving that need.
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Listening Is an Overlooked Leadership Tool

Listening Is an Overlooked Leadership Tool | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
“What do you think?”

I ask this question a lot. My team knows that when they come to me with a question, this is likely the question I’ll come back with first. Sometimes I even preface it with, “I don’t know.” As leaders in our organizations, it’s up to us to coach colleagues and our employees through finding that answer. More often than not, when I ask this question, my team has a better answer than I do — or one that I hadn’t thought about before.

It can be a powerful technique, especially if there is no single right answer – a situation that will be familiar to anyone doing leading-edge work. But it only works in an organization that values listening.

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David Hain's curator insight, May 27, 2016 7:09 AM

Listening matters - here's the why and some hows!

donhornsby's curator insight, May 27, 2016 8:51 AM
So how can we listen more? 

Three suggestions to try this week: 

 Look people in the eye. Sherry Turkle, a professor at MIT who studies the psychology of online connectivity, wisely wrote in her recent book Reclaiming Conversation, “We face a significant choice. It is not about giving up our phones but about using them with greater intention. Conversation is there for us to reclaim.” Put down your phone when you’re in meetings. Close your laptop. See if you’re more energized about work and the people with whom you work. 

 Create space in your day. Manage your calendar and stop booking yourself out the entire day. Can someone on your team be part of that meeting? Does it need to be an hour, or can 30 minutes suffice? Give yourself time for reflection and space throughout the day, so that when you are talking with someone, you can give them your full attention. 

 Ask more questions. Next time a colleague or employee asks for advice, make sure you’re listening and understand the situation. Then, before answering, ask a question. Clarify what they really need — usually it’s just validation that their thinking is on the right track.
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 28, 2016 10:27 AM

Totally agree.

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Six Leadership Styles by Daniel Goleman

Six Leadership Styles by Daniel Goleman | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it

Daniel Goleman, in his article “Leadership That Gets Results”, has identified six different leadership styles, and he believes that good leaders will adopt one of these six styles to meet the needs of different situations.

 

None of the six leadership styles by Daniel Goleman are right or wrong – each may be appropriate depending on the specific context. Whilst one of the more empathetic styles is most likely to be needed to build long-term commitment, there will be occasions when a commanding style may need to be called upon, for example, when a rapid and decisive response is required.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=LeaderShip


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Daniel-GOLEMAN



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Lauran Star's curator insight, September 21, 2014 2:56 PM

While type does matter - I believe a successful leader has a bit of all

Claude Emond's curator insight, September 23, 2014 4:12 PM

Daniel Goleman's (Emotional Intelligence) classification of leadership styles

Dian J Harrison, MSW, MPA's curator insight, February 5, 2015 6:51 PM

What is your leadership style!

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Learning By Thinking: How Reflection Improves Performance

Learning By Thinking: How Reflection Improves Performance | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it

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Maria Rachelle's curator insight, May 1, 2014 12:15 PM
The effect of reflection on learning is mediated by greater perceived ability to achieve a goal (i.e., self-efficacy). The study results reveal reflection to be a powerful mechanism behind learning, confirming the words of American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer John Dewey: We do not learn from experience ... we learn from reflecting on experience." Reflection ha a role in leadership as well.  Read more now.
David Hain's curator insight, May 2, 2014 6:02 AM

Title says it all!  Like most great and worthwhile activities, even better when done with others!

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BOLD: Bold Leadership is Not What You Think

BOLD: Bold Leadership is Not What You Think | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it

 

Bold leadership isn’t reserved for the chosen few, and it certainly isn’t limited to popular culture’s definition of big, brash, loud leadership.

 

Bold leadership is about the everyday behaviors we use to build trust, focusing on the needs of others, leading with confident humility, and vulnerably engaging with our people in authentic and genuine ways.

Be BOLD!

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 13, 2014 12:48 PM


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=LeaderShip


Gaetan Klein's curator insight, February 14, 2014 11:52 AM

It is intereting to think about what is bold leadership. One must have quality in my opinion is presence : the quality of the relationship.

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What Teacher Leadership Looks Like for the New School Year

What Teacher Leadership Looks Like for the New School Year | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Last school year, Barnett Berry, CEO of the Center for Teaching Quality, interviewed me for a book called Teacherpreneurs: Innovative Teachers Who Lead But Don't Leave. In it, he focused on how I wor

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Accelerating and sustaining leadership power: Developing a culture of coaching | Accenture Outlook

Accelerating and sustaining leadership power: Developing a culture of coaching | Accenture Outlook | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Organizations are increasingly looking to develop leaders who are good coaches—and to create a broader culture of coaching that can accelerate positive business impacts.

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SbuxTSM's curator insight, August 13, 2013 11:50 AM

Interesting read.

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America's Happiest Companies Make More Money

America's Happiest Companies Make More Money | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it

Workplace happiness may seem like a fuzzy concept when it comes to financial value. But as the Parnassus Workplace Fund has proven, dignity has - and creates - value.


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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, February 22, 2013 10:50 AM

 

"At this point, the evidence suggests many of us remain suspicious of any firm that, say, allows its employees to play foosball or shoot hoops during work hours.

 

But our enduring cynicism may also have its roots in traditional beliefs about leadership effectiveness.

 

Many of us have been taught that it’s actually desirable to have some worker unhappiness. The idea is that keeping people under some constant tension actually is a more powerful driver of productivity.

 

There’s also the concern that when employees are cared for to any extent they’re likely to get soft in the middle--so sufficiently sated that motivation to work hard and produce is spoiled. "

 

Check out this article for evidence that suggests that our enduring cynicism  and thought patterns are wrong...

donhornsby's curator insight, February 23, 2013 9:03 AM

(From the article): According to a 1997 article in the San Francisco Chronicle, many business leaders dismissed Moskowitz’s earliest list of “Best Places To Work” and derided it as being “a ’beauty contest’ that didn’t matter to anyone outside of corporate personnel departments.” But Moskowitz, and soon after, Dodson, have gone on to prove that the leaders at organizations which ensure employees feel valued, supported, developed, and rewarded are the most enlightened. They inspire a greatly expanded bottom line and set an example for all to follow in this 21st century.

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The impact of trust in the workplace

The impact of trust in the workplace | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, Trust is defined as: assured reliance on the character, ability, strength, or truth of someone or something.
In the

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ThinDifference's curator insight, February 2, 2013 2:09 PM

Key thoughts on building and sustaining trust in organizations:

1)  Integrity must be embedded; 2)  Treatment of people (create the right culture); 3)  Focus on shared goals; 4)  Do what's right, regardless of personal risk.

Peg Gillard's curator insight, February 3, 2013 5:45 PM

Trust is one of the essential keystones at the core of any organization or relationship. 

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10 Traits of Courageous Leaders - Forbes

10 Traits of Courageous Leaders - Forbes | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
To move your organization forward during times of fear and stress, it takes courage and stamina. Do you possess the ten traits of courageous leaders?

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Mercor's curator insight, January 21, 2013 5:07 AM

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Cruise Line Class's curator insight, January 26, 2013 9:14 AM

Great article! 

 

My philosophy:  Act in Spite of Fear!

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The Cost of Distrust

The Cost of Distrust | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Distrust commands a very handsome price. It destroys initiative, damages relationships, creates a toxic environment and reduces competitiveness.

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donhornsby's curator insight, December 2, 2016 11:10 AM
What if I told you that mistrust could kill our individual aspirations, cripple our personal and business relationships, strip the muscle from our most powerful leaders, and crush the productivity and morale of our best and brightest people? Would I have your attention? Then why don’t we give trust the attention it deserves?
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 2, 2016 2:05 PM
Trust is earned. Parker Palmer said authority (trust) is authored in the words and actions of a person. My experience is there is not much trust in schools.
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10 Things People Who Are Mentally Tough Do

10 Things People Who Are Mentally Tough Do | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Mental strength involves more than just having willpower. It requires the habits of hard work and commitment.

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donhornsby's curator insight, September 2, 2016 9:04 AM
Mentally tough people are the determined ones, the ones you put your money on to succeed. Start today to build the habits that will put you among them.
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9 Reasons Why Hitting Rock Bottom Will Make You Stronger

9 Reasons Why Hitting Rock Bottom Will Make You Stronger | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it

Maybe your business has failed or your venture gone off track. 


Maybe you were supposed to be the next Steve Jobs, but it's all gone bad. For whatever reason, you find yourself in a place you never imagined--rock bottom. But failure is not fatal and rock bottom is not forever, unless you make it so. There are very important lessons to learn when you've hit rock bottom. Here are nine of the most important:


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donhornsby's curator insight, June 27, 2016 9:30 AM
I needed to read this today. I think you do as well.

(From the article):  Rock bottom can become the solid foundation on which you can rebuild your life. Whatever life gives you, even if it hurts a lot, be strong. Remember, strong walls may shake but they never collapse. You were given this life, this pain, this struggle, so work to keep yourself strong enough to make it through.
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Five Moments When Saying No Is Your Best Strategy

Five Moments When Saying No Is Your Best Strategy | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Most successful leaders have little difficulty saying no to a losing deal, to a project that’s wasting money, or to a request that doesn’t align with their priorities. But these same leaders can find it very uncomfortable to speak up when their concerns are less cut-and-dried or when their organization is hell-bent on pursuing a plan. In certain situations, it can feel politically risky to hesitate or ask too many questions. Even with their direct reports, many leaders find themselves putting off the difficult conversations needed to address issues such as drifting standards, inappropriate behavior, or emerging bad habits.

But, as difficult as it can be, saying no is often the key to effective leadership. Without the ability to push back when needed, you run the risk of “commitment drift”: promises made to customers or employees, or to promote safety, specific values, financial discipline, or social and environmental responsibility are eroded incrementally, without anyone really stopping to think about the consequences. As Joseph Fuller and Michael C. Jensen pointed out in their 2002 paper “Just Say No to Wall Street: Putting a Stop to the Earnings Game,” saying no to such dysfunctional momentum can be your best strategy for helping your company succeed as well as living your values.

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David Hain's curator insight, June 8, 2016 3:46 AM

If your gut says no, it probably should prompt you to say no - or at least explore your concerns openly!

donhornsby's curator insight, June 8, 2016 10:49 AM
(From the article): Being prepared to recognize and act on these moments of truth makes it less likely that you will blow by critical decision points without giving them the attention they deserve. The fact is, it only gets harder to speak up if you wait. And, as you practice saying no or raising questions constructively, you increase your ability to exert a positive influence on your organization.
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Coaching People Who Resist Change

Coaching People Who Resist Change | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
There are a million reasons to stay the same, when you feel pressure to change. In my opinion change is great as long as someone else is doing it. Resistance is the point of potential growth. Consi...

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Leadership | It's Not About Us - It's about OTHERS!

Leadership | It's Not About Us - It's about OTHERS! | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it

By Linda Fisher Thornton

You may have noticed that people's expectations of us as leaders have increased exponentially. Consumers are choosing companies that care about their well-being. Employees want to work for companies that treat people well, do meaningful work and give back to the community. To survive in this new land where ethics is key to success, we must understand that it is not all about us.

 

Leadership may have once been defined by eloquence, power, or charisma, but today’s successful leadership is defined by creating value for others.  In a human development sense, our understanding of leadership has essentially “grown up” and moved past personal ego and a self-centered view of things. It has progressed from being “all about us” to being about our long-term impact on others.


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Gust MEES's curator insight, May 2, 2014 3:12 PM

Leadership may have once been defined by eloquence, power, or charisma, but today’s successful leadership is defined by creating value for others.  In a human development sense, our understanding of leadership has essentially “grown up” and moved past personal ego and a self-centered view of things. It has progressed from being “all about us” to being about our long-term impact on others.


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Why Trust is the New Core of Leadership - Forbes

Why Trust is the New Core of Leadership - Forbes | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Not long ago, most discussions of leadership were about leaders – their personality traits, how to identify and groom those with ‘leadership potential,’ and what were the skills that leaders employed.

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Zian Peak's curator insight, May 6, 2014 10:49 AM

I dont believe it's the new core, it's been there all along, perhaps we are only just taking notice. Do you agree?

Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, June 1, 2014 8:37 AM

Collaboration and Shared Leadership are the norm in schools today. At the base of success with these tools is trust.

Mercedes Jahn's curator insight, June 1, 2014 11:06 AM

Trust is the invisible and powerful  life "glue" 

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Show You Care: Four must-have strategies to build feedback channels in your organization

Show You Care: Four must-have strategies to build feedback channels in your organization | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Great leadership and employee engagement: Four must-have strategies to build feedback channels in your organization

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Claudia DeSalvo's curator insight, August 16, 2013 2:55 PM

Communication is key, especially when it comes to giving feedback. Talking at people isn't as effective as taking the time to build a structure for relationships.

 

Understanding is a must, especially when it comes to building trust and engagement. Do your employees know what they need to do to be successful? Giving them adequate resources is a crucial part in ensuring top quality results from them. The article gives a good question to ask yourself:


“What is the most important thing these employees want to know, what is the best way to encourage dialogue and how would they be most comfortable sharing input?”

 

After taking the employees into consideration, think of good ways to get them to share their ideas. This will be an opening for formal[printed] and informal[a quick convo] feedback. The feedback should be respected by both parties, and should be responded to in a timely manner. This makes it so that the employee feels valued. After exchanging feedback, you should continue regularly sharing ideas. Communication is best when its two-way.

AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, August 19, 2013 6:40 AM

Great scoop Claudia.  The only thing I would add to the article is that the supervisor should ensure to request additional feedback from her/his direct reports, in addition to getting feedback from established organiazation channels like suggestion boxes, etc.  

 

The reason this is so important is becuase direct report have great specific insight that can help the supervisor learn even more from the feedback.  

 

Frrom the article:

 

Act on feedback – Highly engaged employees are enthused about their organization and believe they can positively influence its success. Acting on employee feedback and highlighting the impact employees make is a strong engagement builder. Be sure that all employees know how their colleagues’ suggestions or ideas are being implemented.


Regularly sharing results and requesting additional feedback creates predictable, consistent two-way communication that encourages employees to take ownership and understand their ideas are valued by the organization. 

Scott Span, MSOD's curator insight, August 20, 2013 9:58 AM

What strategies would you add? 

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Train the Trainer Tips: 7 Truths About Remembering (Free Download)

Train the Trainer Tips: 7 Truths About Remembering (Free Download) | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Whether we are developing a large curriculum or delivering a single workshop, our clients often need us to train the trainer. The trainer is oftentimes not a trainer at all, but a subject matter e

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Gust MEES's curator insight, August 7, 2013 12:55 PM

 

A MUST read!!!

 

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Rediscovering Leadership: Service Versus Self-Interest

Rediscovering Leadership: Service Versus Self-Interest | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it

 

Whatever happened to leadership? Have all the great leaders gone from the world scene? Are leaders born, or do they emerge in appropriate circumstances?

 

A few years ago the London Sunday Times ran an article with the title “Whatever Happened to Real Leaders?” It read in part: “The foreign secretary was a stuffed shirt. But the prime minister was not even that: ‘he was just a hole in the air.’ The words are George Orwell’s, applied to Lord Halifax and Stanley Baldwin, in the late 1930s. What resonance they have today! . . . What the country needs is leadership, and this is true of the Western world as a whole.”

 

The article continued, “The gap between the desirable and the real has never been as great in this respect. As you open the newspapers or watch the television news, is there a single political leader in the West whose words you would expect to remember? Would you expect to learn anything from them? Do you expect them to do anything inspiring or creative, or even just the right thing? We have reached a real low point in leadership, lower than at any other time in recent history. . . . ‘I sowed dragons, and I reaped fleas,’ said Nietzsche.” It’s a powerful plea for the kind of leadership that can deliver humanity from the grip of its many problems and evils.


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Rim Riahi's curator insight, March 20, 2013 2:59 AM

Whatever happened to leadership? Have all the great leaders gone from the world scene? Are leaders born, or do they emerge in appropriate circumstances?

John Michel's curator insight, March 20, 2013 8:17 PM

True leadership is and always has been a selfless action. It involves taking yourself out of the picture and considering the needs of others. It is a way of thinking that takes other people into account even when your own needs are pressing.

///////////

John Michel, experienced leader, humanitarian, visioneer, and renown status quo buster, is the author of the ground breaking book, Mediocre Me: How Saying No to the Status Quo will Propel you from Ordinary to Extraordinary. Check out his blog at www.MediocreMe.com or drop him a note at johnmichel@MediocreMe.com


Andrrey Yatsenko's curator insight, November 5, 2014 11:54 AM
Rediscovering Leadership: Transformation of Thought Leader with Social media / Next Level/.
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[Infographic] Leadership Qualities | Leadership In Action

[Infographic] Leadership Qualities | Leadership In Action | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
We put together an infographic that describes some leadership qualities that can be developed and put in your own skills filing cabinet.

...


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Ali Godding's curator insight, February 21, 2013 11:14 AM

There it is... the challenge of management on one page.  Being all of these things is a tall order.  Many are up for it, few really live it.... great infographic! 

Larry Davies's curator insight, February 21, 2013 2:52 PM

Love me some infographics.

Lauran Star's curator insight, February 21, 2013 4:00 PM

Leadership qualities.

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Five Big Discoveries About Leadership

Five Big Discoveries About Leadership | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it

...4. Turns out leadership really is personal

Bosses are typically viewed as arrogant individuals who drive people using objectives and metrics. One study found that 60% of employees are miserable – not because of low pay, poor workplace benefits, or insufficient vacation days – but because they don’t feel connected at work.


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David Hain's curator insight, January 19, 2013 12:40 AM

Some of these are confirming my intuition, but all of them are right on the money and it's good to see the research.

AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, January 21, 2013 2:33 PM

for some reason, the link takes us to the last page of the report.  Its worthwhile to click on the #1 and read the whole report.

 

I totally agree with David Hain on his commentary, great to see the research!

Richard Hart's curator insight, January 31, 2013 10:13 AM

Research such as this breathes new life into the leadership truisms we all know, but sometimes fail to attend to in the midst of our busy lives