Coaching in Education for learning and leadership
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Coaching in Education for learning and leadership
Focus on coaching for leadership and change in K-12 education
Curated by Les Howard
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Rescooped by Les Howard from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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Criticism Is Not Feedback | #LEARNing2LEARN #Coaching #ModernEDU

Criticism Is Not Feedback | #LEARNing2LEARN #Coaching #ModernEDU | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Are You Open to Feedback?

Some people avoid feedback like the plague. They think that if they don’t know their flaws, they don’t have any. It shouldn’t come as a surprise that these folks make the same mistakes over and over again. Other people evade constructive feedback by surrounding themselves with yes people. They’d rather receive confirmation of their own ideas than be challenged by opposing views. While that might do wonders for their ego, it does little to advance their cause. The fact is, surrounding yourself with yes people is like talking to yourself.

Feedback should be welcomed rather than feared.

 

In fact, we should thank folks who make the effort to nurture us with their valuable input –– even if it hurts at times. How do you expect to become a better person if you don’t know where to begin? The truth is, practice doesn’t make perfect if you’re doing it wrong. Feedback enables us to learn about our shortcomings and take corrective action. Don’t bury your head…nourish it. That’s how excellence is born.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=feedback

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Coaching

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/01/04/practice-better-ways-to-say-i-dont-know-in-the-classroom/

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Criticism

 


Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, January 9, 11:30 AM
Are You Open to Feedback?

Some people avoid feedback like the plague. They think that if they don’t know their flaws, they don’t have any. It shouldn’t come as a surprise that these folks make the same mistakes over and over again. Other people evade constructive feedback by surrounding themselves with yes people. They’d rather receive confirmation of their own ideas than be challenged by opposing views. While that might do wonders for their ego, it does little to advance their cause. The fact is, surrounding yourself with yes people is like talking to yourself.

Feedback should be welcomed rather than feared.

 

In fact, we should thank folks who make the effort to nurture us with their valuable input –– even if it hurts at times. How do you expect to become a better person if you don’t know where to begin? The truth is, practice doesn’t make perfect if you’re doing it wrong. Feedback enables us to learn about our shortcomings and take corrective action. Don’t bury your head…nourish it. That’s how excellence is born.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=feedback

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Coaching

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/01/04/practice-better-ways-to-say-i-dont-know-in-the-classroom/

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Criticism

 

Imrana Rana's comment, January 9, 7:48 PM
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Rescooped by Les Howard from All About Coaching
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Critical Friends: The Benefits of Instructional Coaches

Critical Friends: The Benefits of Instructional Coaches | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it

 

Instructional coaches seem to be a new phenomenon in schools. Their job is to help educators become better teachers. They observe teachers teaching, go over instructional data, and model good teaching practices. As much as this may be new for schools, the core of instructional coaching has been around for a long time.


Via Gust MEES, Ariana Amorim
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Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, March 21, 2013 4:43 PM

"Knights says instructional coaches employ the following seven practices:
• Enrolls the teacher - they conduct one-to-one interviews with each teacher prior to the experience. 
• Engages in collaborative planning - The coach meets with the collaborating teacher to discuss how a new teaching practice can be implemented effectively. 
• Models the lesson- The coach must model the lesson in the collaborating teacher's classroom while the teacher observes. 
• Teacher-directed post conference - Both parties must meet to discuss what the teacher observed the coach doing while modeling the lesson. 
• Coach observes the lesson- It's the teacher's turn to teach the lesson. 
• Exploring data together - The coach and teacher discuss the data gathered during mutual observations. 
• Providing continued support - This is a continuous relationship that needs to be fostered over the year."


I am eager to keep practicing effective coaching.  Fidelity is an on-going issue.  

Rachelle Wooten's comment, March 23, 2013 6:10 PM
This was a great read! This is mostly what I do. These practices for Knight will help me more consistent in my quality of service. I plan to begin doing research of my own to assess the impact of ed tech coaching.
Rachelle Wooten's curator insight, March 23, 2013 6:11 PM

This was a great read! This is mostly what I do. These practices for Knight will help me more consistent in my quality of service. I plan to begin doing research of my own to assess the impact of ed tech coaching.