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Coaching in Education for learning and leadership
Focus on coaching for leadership and change in K-12 education
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Ladder of Inference to Minimize Misunderstandings | Trainers Warehouse Blog

Ladder of Inference to Minimize Misunderstandings | Trainers Warehouse Blog | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it

How many times have you acted on an assumption that turned out to be wrong? It happens all the time.

 

The Ladder of Inference, originally developed by Harvard Business School professorChris Argyris, helps us understand our communication barriers and come to common understanding based on shared data and interpretation. It is a wonderful tool if you’re teaching communication and soft skills workshops, but it’s also a great tool to use as a teacher or trainer, to better understand the thinking of your students or colleagues.


Via Ariana Amorim
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Tension: How coaches can optimise it

Tension: How coaches can optimise it | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Tension: Continuing their series on challenging coaching Ian Day and John Blakey take a look at how to turn tension into a positive thing.

 

It can be seen that if coaches hold the belief that tension is negative and should be avoided at all cost, they might be selling their coachees short. On the other hand, if we carefully calibrate tension and responsibly adjust levels of tension to suit the individual and their organisational context, then greater levels of performance are attainable. Can we afford to take the liberty of not exploring this possibility fully when times are tough and everyone is required to 'up their game'?


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Gloria Inostroza's comment, October 15, 2012 5:47 PM
¡Por supuesto! Por ello los educadores debemos aprender a identificar o diseñar "conflictos fértiles" para que los estudiantes aprendan.
Tim Thomas's curator insight, May 5, 2014 10:11 PM

Good read