Coaching in Education for learning and leadership
4.1K views | +0 today
Follow
Coaching in Education for learning and leadership
Focus on coaching for leadership and change in K-12 education
Curated by Les Howard
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Les Howard from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Instructional Coaches Make a Huge Impact | #Coaching #LEARNing2LEARN

Instructional Coaches Make a Huge Impact | #Coaching #LEARNing2LEARN | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Instructional coaches are the unsung heroes of the education profession. They nimbly navigate the line between administrator and teacher as they strive to make an impact across multiple grade levels and school sites. Instructional coaches have a unique vantage point – they see things happening at the ground level and are able to offer a perspective that few educators have.

One of the biggest issues confronting schools today is how to provide continuous, high-quality training to teachers and staff. District budgets are not what they used to be and education leaders must come up with creative and cost-effective ways to continue to provide this level of training in their schools. One innovative way of doing this is to create the role of an instructional coach in their district by hiring a teacher leader from within. Many districts call these specialists TOSAs (Teachers On Special Assignment). Other districts call them coordinators, but they serve the same purpose: providing perpetual PD in a non-evaluative, non-judgemental environment. These “thought partners” work collaboratively with teachers by asking them what they need and showing them how it can be deployed.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/07/13/coaching-instead-of-teaching-in-modern-education/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/12/19/teaching-was-yesterday-today-is-coaching-the-learners-students-for-learning-to-learn/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/07/10/education-collaboration-and-coaching-the-future/

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Coaching

 

 

 


Via Gust MEES
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, October 12, 2016 3:33 PM
Instructional coaches are the unsung heroes of the education profession. They nimbly navigate the line between administrator and teacher as they strive to make an impact across multiple grade levels and school sites. Instructional coaches have a unique vantage point – they see things happening at the ground level and are able to offer a perspective that few educators have.

One of the biggest issues confronting schools today is how to provide continuous, high-quality training to teachers and staff. District budgets are not what they used to be and education leaders must come up with creative and cost-effective ways to continue to provide this level of training in their schools. One innovative way of doing this is to create the role of an instructional coach in their district by hiring a teacher leader from within. Many districts call these specialists TOSAs (Teachers On Special Assignment). Other districts call them coordinators, but they serve the same purpose: providing perpetual PD in a non-evaluative, non-judgemental environment. These “thought partners” work collaboratively with teachers by asking them what they need and showing them how it can be deployed.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/07/13/coaching-instead-of-teaching-in-modern-education/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/12/19/teaching-was-yesterday-today-is-coaching-the-learners-students-for-learning-to-learn/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/07/10/education-collaboration-and-coaching-the-future/

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Coaching

 

 

 

Rescooped by Les Howard from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Stop talking tech: 3 tips for pedagogy-based coaching

Stop talking tech: 3 tips for pedagogy-based coaching | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Teachers care about creating authentic learning experiences, and it’s up to coaches to show how technology can help them do that.

 

As tech integration specialist Krista Moroder pointed out, most teachers don’t care about technology — nor should they.

 

Teachers care about creating authentic learning experiences, and it’s up to coaches to show how technology can help them do that.


Via Gust MEES
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, May 7, 2014 2:34 PM

As tech integration specialist Krista Moroder pointed outmost teachers don’t care about technology — nor should they.


Rescooped by Les Howard from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Why Do Teachers Need Instructional Coaches?

Why Do Teachers Need Instructional Coaches? | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it
Instructional Coaching

According to Jim Knight, someone I work with as an instructional coaching trainer, up to 90% of what teachers learn alongside coaches will be retained. This means, that unlike traditional professional development where Knight's research shows that teachers lose 90% of what they learn, coaching can provide an enormous impact.

Knight's work is highly respected, and is highly respectful of teachers. Instructional coaching, in Knight's research and philosophy, is about working in partnership with teachers where the learning is reciprocal on the part of the teacher and coach. After all, we can learn a lot from one another.

In order for coaching to work properly, the school has to have a climate conducive to learning, which means that there needs to be a balance between risk-taking and rule following.  It also means that teachers need to be able to trust that the coaching-teaching relationship will be confidential, something Knight believes both parties should come to an agreement on before the coaching relationship even begins.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Coaching

 


Via Gust MEES
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, February 12, 2016 3:36 AM

Instructional Coaching


According to Jim Knight, someone I work with as an instructional coaching trainer, up to 90% of what teachers learn alongside coaches will be retained. This means, that unlike traditional professional development where Knight's research shows that teachers lose 90% of what they learn, coaching can provide an enormous impact.

Knight's work is highly respected, and is highly respectful of teachers. Instructional coaching, in Knight's research and philosophy, is about working in partnership with teachers where the learning is reciprocal on the part of the teacher and coach. After all, we can learn a lot from one another.

In order for coaching to work properly, the school has to have a climate conducive to learning, which means that there needs to be a balance between risk-taking and rule following.  It also means that teachers need to be able to trust that the coaching-teaching relationship will be confidential, something Knight believes both parties should come to an agreement on before the coaching relationship even begins.


Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Coaching




Rescooped by Les Howard from All About Coaching
Scoop.it!

Critical Friends: The Benefits of Instructional Coaches

Critical Friends: The Benefits of Instructional Coaches | Coaching in Education for learning and leadership | Scoop.it

 

Instructional coaches seem to be a new phenomenon in schools. Their job is to help educators become better teachers. They observe teachers teaching, go over instructional data, and model good teaching practices. As much as this may be new for schools, the core of instructional coaching has been around for a long time.


Via Gust MEES, Ariana Amorim
more...
Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, March 21, 2013 4:43 PM

"Knights says instructional coaches employ the following seven practices:
• Enrolls the teacher - they conduct one-to-one interviews with each teacher prior to the experience. 
• Engages in collaborative planning - The coach meets with the collaborating teacher to discuss how a new teaching practice can be implemented effectively. 
• Models the lesson- The coach must model the lesson in the collaborating teacher's classroom while the teacher observes. 
• Teacher-directed post conference - Both parties must meet to discuss what the teacher observed the coach doing while modeling the lesson. 
• Coach observes the lesson- It's the teacher's turn to teach the lesson. 
• Exploring data together - The coach and teacher discuss the data gathered during mutual observations. 
• Providing continued support - This is a continuous relationship that needs to be fostered over the year."


I am eager to keep practicing effective coaching.  Fidelity is an on-going issue.  

Rachelle Wooten's comment, March 23, 2013 6:10 PM
This was a great read! This is mostly what I do. These practices for Knight will help me more consistent in my quality of service. I plan to begin doing research of my own to assess the impact of ed tech coaching.
Rachelle Wooten's curator insight, March 23, 2013 6:11 PM

This was a great read! This is mostly what I do. These practices for Knight will help me more consistent in my quality of service. I plan to begin doing research of my own to assess the impact of ed tech coaching.