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'Now here or No where' Coaching and Mentoring
Coaching and Mentoring info for those who have attended my training courses and for anyone who wants to learn and keep up dated.
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Three Keys to Mindful Leadership Coaching

Three Keys to Mindful Leadership Coaching | 'Now here or No where' Coaching and Mentoring | Scoop.it
By Douglas Riddle There are countless executive coaches I would never hire for myself, no matter how wise, insightful, dynamic or experienced. Admittedly, I’m a hard guy to please, so what I require might not be a good guide for others. However, if a coach can’t create an environment that dissolves [...]
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Three Keys to Mindful Leadership Coaching

Three Keys to Mindful Leadership Coaching | 'Now here or No where' Coaching and Mentoring | Scoop.it
By Douglas Riddle There are countless executive coaches I would never hire for myself, no matter how wise, insightful, dynamic or experienced. Admittedly, I’m a hard guy to please, so what I require might not be a good guide for others.
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Crocus Coaching and Development

Crocus Coaching and Development | 'Now here or No where' Coaching and Mentoring | Scoop.it

professional Business and Personal Coaching, Training Mentoring Mindfulness MBTI SDI workshops based in Hertfordshire UK

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YouTube

Thanks to the DT Coaching group for finding this clip that explains coaching so quickly.
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[Ask Gladeana] Please can you explain the concept of Transference

[Ask Gladeana] Please can you explain the concept of Transference | 'Now here or No where' Coaching and Mentoring | Scoop.it
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‘Reverse mentoring’ for older workers

‘Reverse mentoring’ for older workers | 'Now here or No where' Coaching and Mentoring | Scoop.it
Companies draft younger workers to help older boomer colleagues stay up-to-date on tech and social nuances.
Suzanne Izzard's insight:

I have seen this approach now starting to be used in a couple of companies. It is a great idea and we can all learn from people of all ages and we are never too old to elarn anything. 

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Clean Language - David Grove's 'clean' communications methodology plus sample questions and introduction guide for learning

Clean Language - David Grove's 'clean' communications methodology plus sample questions and introduction guide for learning | 'Now here or No where' Coaching and Mentoring | Scoop.it
David Grove's Clean Language methodology for effective communications - theory, examples, for clean coaching, therapy counselling, management, counselling, parenting and relationships.
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A clear and consice explaination of Clean Language and the type of questions to use in coaching

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The Executive and the Elephant - About the Book

The Executive and the Elephant - About the Book | 'Now here or No where' Coaching and Mentoring | Scoop.it
The Executive and the Elephant tells how to develop the CEO in your brain to manage your inner elephant--which includes your ego, impulses, and poor leadership habits.
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Seth's Blog: How to listen

Seth's Blog: How to listen | 'Now here or No where' Coaching and Mentoring | Scoop.it
Live interaction still matters. Teachers, meetings, presentations, one on one brainstorms--they can lead to real change. The listener has nearly as big a responsibility as the speaker does, though.
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Useful Links in Coaching | Coaching at Work

Useful Links in Coaching | Coaching at Work | 'Now here or No where' Coaching and Mentoring | Scoop.it
Useful links for professional bodies with representatives on the Coaching at Work Editorial Board. Find links for coaching journals.
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A list of professional bodies with representatives on the Coaching at Work Editorial Board - a useful resource of contacts for information
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How to choose the right Coach training course | Barefoot Coaching

How to choose the right Coach training course | Barefoot Coaching | 'Now here or No where' Coaching and Mentoring | Scoop.it
General





It can be really hard to know where to start when looking for a coach training course. There are so many institutes, awarding bodies, endorsements and qualifications ava...
Suzanne Izzard's insight:

With coaching there are so many routes you can go, it depends on how much time, money and interest you have to invest in a qualification. Many coaches are not accredited or qualified but still practice, many are qualified but are awful coaches! Speak to coaches who you know who are effective and recommended, ask them their thoughts, what ever you do do not rush into your choice, take your time to find the right one for you.

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Association for Coaching

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A fantastic resource of articles from the Association for Coaching. I am an accredited coach with the AC and thier new website is an excellent resource for both coaches and anyone looking for a coach.If you wish to contact me for coaching please email suzanne.izzard@gmail.com .

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An insight to GROW

An insight to GROW | 'Now here or No where' Coaching and Mentoring | Scoop.it

GROW Coaching  The GROW (Goals, Reality, Options, Will) sequence assumes that all 4 stages are visited, which is usually the case when approaching a new issue for the first time. Often, however, coaching will be used to progress a task or process that has been discussed before or is already under way. In such cases coaching may begin or end with any stage.  GOAL - Goal setting for the session as well as the short and long term, ‘What do you want?  It may seem strange to set Goals before examining Reality. Logic suggests the opposite, as we surely need to know the reality before we can set any goal. Not so – goals based on current reality alone are liable to be negative, a response to a problem or limited by past performance.  When coaching we need to distinguish between end goals and performance goals. An end goal is the final objective you want to achieve. Sometimes, in business, these are beyond our absolute control as we cannot always know or control what our competitors do. A performance goal identifies the performance level that you believe will provide you with a very good chance of achieving your end goal. It is largely within your control and generally provides a means of measuring progress. An end goal should wherever possible be supported by a performance goal. The end goal may provide the inspiration, but the performance goal defines the specification.  A striking example of a robust and successful goal setting comes from the 1976 Olympics. In 1972 John Nabor watched Mark Spitz win an extraordinary 7 gold medals for swimming in the Olympics in Munich. There and then John decided he would win the gold in the 100 metres backstroke in 1976, his end goal.  Although he had won the National Junior Championship at the time, he was still nearly 5 seconds off the pace required to win the Olympics.  Firstly he set himself a performance goal of a new world record and then divided his 5 second deficit by the number of hours training he could afford in 4 years. He worked out he had to improve his time by 1/5 of an eyeblink for every hour of training and he felt this was possible with hard work.  He had improved so much by 1976 that he was made captain of the American swimming team for Montreal and won the gold in both the 100 metres and the 200 metres backstroke, the first in world record time and the second as an Olympic record.  REALITY -  Reality checking to explore the current situation, ‘What is happening now? The most important criteria for examining Reality is objectivity. This demands a high degree of detachment on the part of the coach and the ability to phrase questions in a way that requires factual answers of the coachee. ‘What were the factors that determined your decision?’ will give a more accurate response than, ‘Why did you do that?’ which tends to produce what the coachee believes the coach wants to hear or a defensive justification. The coach should as far as possible encourage the coach to use descriptive rather than evaluative words. The more specific and descriptive, the more productive the conversation.  In the Reality phase questions using ‘What’, ‘When’, ‘Where’, ‘Who’ and ‘How’ should be used. ‘Why’ should only be used sparingly as it invites analysis and opinion as well as defensiveness. Here, the facts are important and at this point we should avoid analysing the emerging situation as this may lead to theory formation and biased data collection. Coaches will need to be especially alert, listening and watching to pick up on all the clues that indicate the direction of questioning to be followed. It must be stressed here that it is the coachee whose awareness is being raised. The coach often does not need to know that whole history of the situation, but merely to be certain that the coach is clear about it.  One Reality question that particularly adds value is, ‘What action have you taken on this so far?’ followed by, ‘What were the effects of that action?’. This emphasises the value of action and the difference between action and thinking about issues. Often people have thought about issues they need to address for ages, but only when asked what they have done about them do they realise they have taken no action at all  It’s surprising how often the thorough investigation of Reality throws up the answer even before Options and Will. This reinforces the value of fully exploring this stage and resisting the impulse to move into Options prematurely. OPTION - Exploring options and alternative strategies or courses of action, ‘What could you do?  The purpose of the Options stage is not to find the ‘right’ answer, but to create and list as many alternative courses of action as possible. The quantity of options is more important at this stage than the quality and feasibility of each one as it is from this broad base of possibilities that specific action steps will be selected. If preferences, censorship, obstacles or the need for completeness are expressed during the collection process, potentially valuable contributions will be missed and choices limited.  Once a comprehensive list has been generated, the Will phase of the session may just be a simple matter of selecting the best of the bunch. However, in more complex issues it may be necessary to re-examine the list by noting the benefits and costs of each of the courses of action. This again should be done by coaching and it is here that some blend of two or more ideas may emerge as the optimum.  Here it is sometimes useful to ask the coachee to evaluate each option on a scale of 1-10.  WILL -  What is to be done, when, by whom and the will to do it, ‘What will you do?  The purpose of the final phase of the coaching sequence is to convert a discussion into a decision and ultimately action. It is the construction of an action plan to meet a requirement that has been clearly specified, on the grounds that it has been thoroughly explored using the widest possible choice of approaches. Here the coach can bring a surprising degree of toughness to the conversation as they are not imposing their own will but activating the will of the individual.  Some coaching questions that are valuable at this stage are  ‘What are you going to do?’  This question is quite distinct from ‘What could you do?’ or ‘What are you thinking of doing?’ or ‘Which of these do you prefer?’. None of these implies a firm decision. In most coaching scenarios the action plan will incorporate more than one of the options or parts of the options combined. Remember, at this point the options have only been loosely defined. Now is the time for the coach to ask questions to clarify the detail of the chosen options.  ‘When are you going to do it? This is potentially the toughest of all the questions. We all have ideas of what we would like to do or are going to do, but it is only when we time frame it that it takes on a level of reality. In this context the timing needs to be specific. If a single action is required then a date and time should be agreed. If the action to be followed is repetitive then the intervals need to be specified  ‘Will this action meet your goal? Now that we have an action and a time frame, it is important before going any further to check that this is leading in the direction of both the goal of the session and the long-term goal. Without checking back the coachee may find that he has wandered off track. If this has happened it is important not to rush to change the action, but to check if in fact it is the goal that needs to be modified in light of what has come up since it was defined.  ‘What obstacles might get in your way? It is important to prepare for and pre-empt any circumstances that could arise that would inhibit the intended course of action. External barriers may be present, but often it is internal ones, such as the reluctance of the coachee, that really get in the way. This can often end up being a separate coaching session in itself  ‘What support do you need? This is possibly related to the previous question, but support can come in many forms. It could mean an arrangement to bring in outside people, skills or resources, or it could be as simple as informing a colleague of your intention and reminding them to keep you on target. Merely sharing an intended target with someone often helps ensure that you do it.  ‘What other considerations do you have? This is a necessary catch-all question so that the coachee cannot claim that the coach has left something out  ‘Rate on a scale of 1-10 the degree of certainty that you will carry out the actions agreed? This is not rating the certainty of the outcome actually happening, it is rating the coachee’s intention to carry out his part of the job.  Completion of the overall goal may depend on the agreement or actions of others and that cannot be rated. Generally speaking if the coachee rates themselves as less than 8 there may be other issues getting in the way of completing the action that need to be explored  

 

Adapted from ‘Coaching for Performance’, John Whitmore, 

Suzanne Izzard's insight:

An article adapted from John Whitmore 'Coaching for Performance'

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Nine in ten employees disengaged in their jobs

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Why Accepting Uncertainty Is The Key To A Meaningful Life

Why Accepting Uncertainty Is The Key To A Meaningful Life | 'Now here or No where' Coaching and Mentoring | Scoop.it
Humbled, I've watched my courageous clients tolerate the uncertainty of what is to come and leap off the mountain without looking back. Some have found great success with their next steps, while others have not been as fortunate.
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NOW YOU SEE IT

NOW YOU SEE IT | 'Now here or No where' Coaching and Mentoring | Scoop.it
Recommend on Facebook Share on Linkedin Pin it on pinterest Share with Stumblers Tumblr it Tweet about it Tell a friend
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Can You Really Improve Your Emotional Intelligence?

Can You Really Improve Your Emotional Intelligence? | 'Now here or No where' Coaching and Mentoring | Scoop.it
It's a noble quest, but a tough one.
Suzanne Izzard's insight:

Good coaching programs do work. Good news for all you coaches and your clients; bad news for the skeptics. While no program can get someone from 0 to 100%, a well-designed coaching intervention can easily achieve improvements of 25%.

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Why coaches should encourage their clients to play.

Why coaches should encourage their clients to play. | 'Now here or No where' Coaching and Mentoring | Scoop.it
Working with a coach is a considered choice which involves personal commitment, and an investment of time, energy and money. Whether it’s a personal or business ...
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NLP Perceptual Positions, by John David Hoag

NLP Perceptual Positions, by John David Hoag | 'Now here or No where' Coaching and Mentoring | Scoop.it
Private NLP Training, Coaching, Therapy sessions Menlo Park San Francisco Bay Area Hypnosis
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The body in coaching and training | TrainingZone.co.uk

The body in coaching and training | TrainingZone.co.uk | 'Now here or No where' Coaching and Mentoring | Scoop.it
To be an effective coach or trainer it is necessary to be skilled at working with the body, yet most training and coaching is a purely cognitive affair, says Mark Walsh.
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Heron's Six Categories of Intervention - Communication Skills Training from MindTools.com

Heron's Six Categories of Intervention - Communication Skills Training from MindTools.com | 'Now here or No where' Coaching and Mentoring | Scoop.it
There are two different approaches you can take when helping others at work. Find out what they are and when to use each one.
Suzanne Izzard's insight:

John Heron's model is worth understanding and exploring to see where you sit naturally and then think about the situations when you might need to use the different intervention catagories. Where do you fall, authoritative or facilitative?

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What is Appreciative Inquiry.mov

What is Appreciative Inquiry is a hi-def training video that includes the 5 principles, 4-D Cycle, positive core, Summit Process, and story of how Appreciati...
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 A brief overview (from US) of AI. A useful explaination to help you see how this links with positive psychology and its use.

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What is Coaching? | Sir John Whitmore 1

What is Coaching? | Sir John Whitmore 1 | 'Now here or No where' Coaching and Mentoring | Scoop.it

What is Coaching? A Brief History and Definition, by Sir Whitmore himself. To coach is not simply to teach, but rather to guide and to aid an individual to maximize their own potential.


Via Mattia Rossi
Suzanne Izzard's insight:

Sir John Whitmore Author of Coaching for Performance, a great book for those who are new to coaching and the GROW model.

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David Clutterbuck Clip

Suzanne Izzard's insight:

I have met and seen David present on a few occasions, he is an author of many books on coaching and mentoring. One of his book proved very useful reading and thought provoking ideas whilst I introduced a uk wide Mentoring scheme to a large Telecoms company,  which went onto be very successful.

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Coaching and mentoring - Factsheets - CIPD

Coaching and mentoring - Factsheets - CIPD | 'Now here or No where' Coaching and Mentoring | Scoop.it
Introductory guidance on coaching and mentoring covering coaching culture, delivery and supervision, and HR's role. Includes the CIPD viewpoint.
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The fundamentals of Coaching and Mentoring explained by the cipd....

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