Co-creation Workshop
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Co-creation Workshop
Everyone is an expert on their own experience as a user.
Curated by Carol Tang
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Participatory Design in Healthcare: Patients and doctors can bridge critical information gaps | UX Magazine

Participatory Design in Healthcare: Patients and doctors can bridge critical information gaps | UX Magazine | Co-creation Workshop | Scoop.it
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Method 1 of 100: Concept Interviews (Designing the User Experience at Autodesk)

Method 1 of 100: Concept Interviews (Designing the User Experience at Autodesk) | Co-creation Workshop | Scoop.it
100 User Experience (UX) Design and Evaluation Methods for Your Toolkit
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Creativity - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Creativity refers to the phenomenon whereby something new is created which has some kind of subjective value (such as a joke, a literary work, a painting or musical composition, a solution, an invention etc.). It is also the qualitative impetus behind any given act of creation, and it is generally perceived to be associated with intelligence and cognition.

The range of scholarly interest in creativity includes a multitude of definitions and approaches involving several disciplines; psychology, cognitive science, education, philosophy (particularly philosophy of science), technology, theology, sociology, linguistics, business studies, and economics, taking in the relationship between creativity and general intelligence, mental and neurological processes associated with creativity, the relationships between personality type and creative ability and between creativity and mental health, the potential for fostering creativity through education and training, especially as augmented by technology, and the application of creative resources to improve the effectiveness of learning and teaching processes.

In a summary of scientific research into creativity Michael Mumford suggested: "Over the course of the last decade, however, we seem to have reached a general agreement that creativity involves the production of novel, useful products" (Mumford, 2003, p. 110).[1] Creativity can also be defined "as the process of producing something that is both original and worthwhile" or "characterized by originality and expressiveness and imaginative".[2] What is produced can come in many forms and is not specifically singled out in a subject or area. Authors have diverged dramatically in their precise definitions beyond these general commonalities: Peter Meusburger reckons that over a hundred different analyses can be found in the literature.[3]

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Talent Isn’t Fixed and Other Mindsets That Lead to Greatness

Talent Isn’t Fixed and Other Mindsets That Lead to Greatness | Co-creation Workshop | Scoop.it
When we welcome the creative struggle we're more likely to succeed.
Carol Tang's insight:

To realize the awesomeness in oneself.

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Co-creation method | European Living Lab - Knowledge Centre

Co-creation method | European Living Lab - Knowledge Centre | Co-creation Workshop | Scoop.it
Carol Tang's insight:

how to clearly explain the concept

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Is co-creation over-hyped? | Features | Research

Co-creation promises to break down the barriers between researchers, consumers and marketers. But how much substance is there behind all the hype? Sheila Keegan of Campbell Keegan and Jeremy Brown of Sense take sides in the debate.
Carol Tang's insight:

both sides of the story.

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Participatory design - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Participatory design (known before as 'Cooperative Design') is an approach to design attempting to actively involve all stakeholders (e.g. employees, partners, customers, citizens, end users) in the design process in order to help ensure the product designed meets their needs and is usable. The term is used in a variety of fields e.g. software design, urban design, architecture, landscape architecture, product design, sustainability, graphic design, planning or even medicine as a way of creating environments that are more responsive and appropriate to their inhabitants' and users' cultural, emotional, spiritual and practical needs. It is one approach to placemaking. It has been used in many settings and at various scales. Participatory design is an approach which is focused on processes and procedures of design and is not a design style. For some, this approach has a political dimension of user empowerment and democratization. For others, it is seen as a way of abrogating design responsibility and innovation by designers.

In several Scandinavian countries of the 1960s and 1970s, it was rooted in work with trade unions; its ancestry also includes Action research and Sociotechnical Design.[1]

In participatory design participants (putative, potential or future) are invited to cooperate with designers, researchers and developers during an innovation process. Potentially, they participate during several stages of an innovation process: they participate during the initial exploration and problem definition both to help define the problem and to focus ideas for solution, and during development, they help evaluate proposed solutions.

Carol Tang's insight:

More understanding on why it is deep rooted in scandinivian countries.

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Co-creation, Part 2

Co-creation, Part 2 | Co-creation Workshop | Scoop.it
  This is a follow up to Co-creation, Part 1, where I focused on co-creation basics -- the definition and a few links I find interesting. Today I intend
Carol Tang's insight:
Defining the basic aspects of co-creation.
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Co-creation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Co-creation is a form of marketing strategy or business strategy that emphasizes the generation and ongoing realization of mutual firm-customer value. It views markets as forums for firms and active customers to share, combine and renew each other's resources and capabilities to create value through new forms of interaction, service and learning mechanisms. It differs from the traditional active firm – passive consumer market construct of the past.

Co-created value arises in the form of personalised, unique experiences for the customer (value-in-use) and ongoing revenue, learning and enhanced market performance drivers for the firm (loyalty, relationships, customer word of mouth). Value is co-created with customers if and when a customer is able to personalize his or her experience using a firm's product-service proposition – in the lifetime of its use – to a level that is best suited to get his or her job(s) or tasks done and which allows the firm to derive greater value from its product-service investment in the form of new knowledge, higher revenues/profitability and/or superior brand value/loyalty.[1]

Scholars C.K. Prahalad and Venkat Ramaswamy introduced the concept in their 2000 Harvard Business Review article, "Co-Opting Customer Competence".[2] They developed their arguments further in their book, published by the Harvard Business School Press, The Future of Competition, where they offered examples including Napster and Netflix showing that customers would no longer be satisfied with making yes or no decisions on what a company offers.[3] Value will be increasingly co-created by the firm and the customer, they argued, rather than being created entirely inside the firm. Co-creation in their view not only describes a trend of jointly creating products. It also describes a movement away from customers buying products and services as transactions, to those purchases being made as part of an experience. The authors held that consumers seek freedom of choice to interact with the firm through a range of experiences. Customers want to define choices in a manner that reflects their view of value, and they want to interact and transact in their preferred language and style.

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Creativity > Innovation > Value

Creativity > Innovation > Value | Co-creation Workshop | Scoop.it

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Carol Tang's insight:

What is creativity at work by Linda Naiman.

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MakeTools

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Liz Sanders: Pioneer in designing co-creation tools

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Breaking News, Analysis, Politics, Blogs, News Photos, Video, Tech Reviews - TIME.com

Breaking News, Analysis, Politics, Blogs, News Photos, Video, Tech Reviews - TIME.com | Co-creation Workshop | Scoop.it
Across from the United States Supreme Court, two hundred people gathered at the Library of Congress to celebrate yesterday — and not because of the court's immigration decision
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Participatory Design

Participatory Design | Co-creation Workshop | Scoop.it
Participatory design is a form of user-centered design. Lately, it has been gaining increased traction as a preferred methodology in new product development.
Carol Tang's insight:

useful links included

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Co-design

Co-design | Co-creation Workshop | Scoop.it
  The term co-design is now widely used within product and service design fields and according to Penny Hagen and Natalie Rowland refers to an approach
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Co-designing

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Co-creation, Part 1

Co-creation, Part 1 | Co-creation Workshop | Scoop.it
  Companies are embracing more collaborative ways of working with third parties, including consumers to co-create unique value.  One way to engage the
Carol Tang's insight:

Defining the basic aspects of co-creation.

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