Co-creation in health
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Co-creation in health
E-citizens, e-patients, communities in shaping e-health, health literacy.
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Et si la santé avait son Tripadvisor...

Et si la santé avait son Tripadvisor... | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Comparer les offres, écouter les avis des clients pour choisir le meilleur produit. Ainsi,  84 % des consommateurs se fient en priorité aux recommandations de leurs pairs et 79 % des personnes qui préparent leurs achats grâce à Internet ont déjà partagé leur avis en ligne, cette pratique devenue commune s’étend à toutes les activités. Les bénéfices sont clairement identifiés : pour le client, faciliter ses  choix et pour les entreprises, développer leurmarque, leur notoriété, leur Eréputation .


Via Renaloo, catherine cerisey
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Smart Machines Can Diagnose Medical Conditions Better Than Human Doctors

Smart Machines Can Diagnose Medical Conditions Better Than Human Doctors | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Until now, medicine has been a prestigious and often extremely lucrative career choice. But with intelligent machines now used to diagnose diseases, in the near future, will we need as many doctors as we have now? Are we going to see significant medical unemployment in the coming decade?


Robot doc vs human doc image from Shutterstock

Ross Crawford is a professor of orthopaedic research, Anjali Jaiprakash is a post-doctoral research fellow of medical robotics and Jonathan Roberts is a professor in robotics at the Queensland University of Technology

Dr Saxon Smith, president of the Australian Medical Association NSW branch, said in a report late last year that the most common concerns he hears from doctors-in-training and medical students are, “what is the future of medicine?” and “will I have a job?”. The answers, he said, continue to elude him.

As Australian, British and American universities continue to graduate increasing numbers of medical students, the obvious question is where will these new doctors work in the future? Will there be an expanded role for medical professionals due to our ageing populations? Or is pressure to reduce costs while improving outcomes likely to force the adoption of new technology, which will then likely erode the number of roles currently performed by doctors?


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Shared Decision-Making Needs To Be Done ... Not Just Tweeted About - Mind The Gap

Shared Decision-Making Needs To Be Done ... Not Just Tweeted About - Mind The Gap | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

One of the challenges we in health care face in today’s digital age is the trend to reducing complex ideas and concepts down to “sound bites.” It is often impossible to fully convey important ideas and concepts in 140 characters of less. But people try anyway … me included.

And because social media makes it so easy to share stuff online, these heretofore complex ideas and concepts quickly begin to lose their true meaning. After all, do you really read everything you “like”, “retweet” or “share” on line in great detail?

Take The Concept Of “Shared Decision-Making”

At face value, a “shared decision” is one made involving two or more people, e.g., the patient and physician. The term brings to mind a physician describing to a patient the pros and cons of a one or more options. A little information is shared and BAM … a shared decision is born.


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Overcome Hurdles to Effective Pharmaceutical Marketing

Topics and discussion points include: Regulations: What are the most often cited violations? Are pharma marketers getting better at compliance? Cautionary tale…
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Dr. Phil is not a medical doctor. But he is now a paid spokesperson for a diabetes drug.

Dr. Phil is not a medical doctor. But he is now a paid spokesperson for a diabetes drug. | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

TV personality Phil McGraw — best known as "Dr. Phil" — will be making the media rounds soon talking about his experiences living with Type 2 diabetes for more than 25 years.

But be aware: This isn't an objective and noble effort to raise awareness or destigmatize a condition that millions of Americans face.

Instead, Dr. Phil has been hired by the drugmaker AstraZeneca as a paid spokesperson — and this presents all sorts of thorny conflict-of-interest problems.

"These campaigns create a blurriness between marketing and public health messages," says Dartmouth physician-researcher Steven Woloshin. "People tend to view them with less skepticism, particularly when there is a trusted celebrity spokesperson."

The Dr. Phil case is an example of a common Big Pharma tactic known as "disease awareness." "The idea is that a spokesperson, often beloved celebrities like Kelsey Grammer or Paula Deen, helps shed light on a particular disease. In turn, they build the base of patients who take a drug company's medications.


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Vitamin D and physical function: Is more better? - Harvard Health Blog

Vitamin D and physical function: Is more better? - Harvard Health Blog | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

The popularity of vitamin D has been surging in recent years, largely because of the growing list of its proposed health benefits. But not all of the claims are backed by evidence. For example, there have been suggestions that vitamin D can help you

  • reduce your risk of arthritis
  • prevent heart disease
  • improve your brain function and lessen your risk of dementia
  • improve your immune function and lessen the risk of immune disorders.

These are difficult claims to prove — or disprove. Most of them come from studies linking a low intake of vitamin D or a low level in the blood with an increased risk of disease or death. But, it’s possible that people with low intake or blood levels of vitamin D levels also smoke more, exercise less, or have other explanations for their higher rates of disease and death.

While it’s not at all clear that vitamin D can deliver these health benefits, getting enough vitamin D is important, especially for maintaining bone health. Severe deficiency of vitamin D can cause osteomalacia, which means “soft bones.” (In children, abnormal bone development due to vitamin D deficiency is called rickets.) Low levels of vitamin D can also contribute to osteoporosis: vitamin D is needed to promote calcium absorption in the gut, and calcium is essential in building and remodeling bone.


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The FDA Now Officially Belongs to Big Pharma

The FDA Now Officially Belongs to Big Pharma | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

It is hard to believe only four senators opposed the confirmation of Robert Califf, who was approved today as the next FDA commissioner. Vocal opponent Bernie Sanders condemned the vote from the campaign trail. But where was Dick Durbin? Where were all the lawmakers who say they care about industry and Wall Street profiteers making money at the expense of public health?


Califf, chancellor of clinical and translational research at Duke University until recently, received money from 23 drug companies including the giants like Johnson & Johnson, Lilly, Merck, Schering Plough and GSK according to a disclosure statement on the website of Duke Clinical Research Institute.


Not merely receiving research funds, Califf also served as a high level Pharma officer, say press reports. Medscape, the medical website, discloses that Califf “served as a director, officer, partner, employee, advisor, consultant or trustee for Genentech.” Portola Pharmaceuticals says Califf served on its board of directors until leaving for the FDA.


In disclosure information for a 2013 article in Circulation, Califf also lists financial links to Gambro, Regeneron, Gilead, AstraZeneca, Roche and other companies and equity positions in four medical companies. Gilead is the maker of the $1000-a-pill hepatitis C drug AlterNet recently wrote about. This is FDA commissioner material?


Califf has gone on record that collaboration between industry and regulators is a good thing. He told NPR, “Many of us consult with the pharmaceutical industry, which I think is a very good thing. They need ideas and then the decision about what they do is really up to the person who is funding the study.” What?


He is known for defending Vioxx which is reported to have caused at least 50,000 heart attacks and events before its withdrawal. (Merck is said to have known about Vioxx’ cardio effects but marketed the blockbuster drug anyway.)


Califf was instrumental in the Duke drug trial of the blood thinner Xarelto and a cheerleader of the drug despite medical experts’ objections to its approval and 379 subsequent deaths. Xarelto's serious and foreseeable risks were back in the news this week.


Duke, where Califf directed clinical research, is still recovering from a major research fraud scandal that resulted in terminated grants, retracted papers and a "60 Minutes" special. It is the least appropriate place from which to choose an FDA commissioner.


Via Pharma Guy
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Pharma Guy's curator insight, February 25, 7:11 AM

Regarding Duke, you might be interested in reading this: "Duke Chimes in on Off-Label Drug Promotion. Will Califf Concur?"; http://sco.lt/5mZaL3 

Pharma Guy's curator insight, March 28, 8:05 AM

Regarding Duke, you might be interested in reading this: "Duke Chimes in on Off-Label Drug Promotion. Will Califf Concur?"; http://sco.lt/5mZaL3 

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These Photos Could Change the Way You Look at Fruits and Vegetables

These Photos Could Change the Way You Look at Fruits and Vegetables | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Seattle photographer Brittany Wright highlights the true face of food using food scraps and farmer's market produce. See her work on food blog Civil Eats!

Via The Planetary Archives / San Francisco, California
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What medicine can borrow from literature

What medicine can borrow from literature | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
For centuries storytelling has been part of society and culture. Dr. Ricardo Nuila, assistant professor of medicine at Baylor College of Medicine, explains how storytelling can help guide doctors through the complex language of medicine and share an experience with patients, not just the science. He says doctors have the opportunity to improve care by…
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Why doctors choose to die differently (Opinion)

Why doctors choose to die differently (Opinion) | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Snow was falling. He sat wrapped in a blanket on the edge of the couch, watching intently out the window. Large flurries lazily made their way down from gray skies. In North Carolina, this was a rare sight.

I stood next to his husband. His body had a musty, sick smell of unwashed hair and urine. His bloated and pale body was littered with tape and tubing. Half his head was shaved, and he had a drain protruding from his scalp. It sunk into the depths of his skull, pulling out the fluid in his brain, drop-by-drop. Large round pupils stared blankly back at me when I pulled back his eyelids, stubbornly refusing to constrict when I shined a light. His arms and legs were covered in green and blue bruises from when we pinched him every hour in vain to see if he would move a muscle. He didn't. He was a corpse with a beating heart.

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The Data Against Kant

The Data Against Kant | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

THE history of moral philosophy is a history of disagreement, but on one point there has been virtual unanimity: It would be absurd to suggest that we should do what we couldn’t possibly do.

This principle — that “ought” implies “can,” that our moral obligations can’t exceed our abilities — played a central role in the work of Immanuel Kant and has been widely accepted since. Indeed, the idea seems self-evidently true, much as “bachelor” implies “man.”

But is it actually true? In 1984, the philosopher Walter Sinnott-Armstrong outlined a series of thought experiments that, he contended, demonstrated that “ought” does not always imply “can.” Though his argument found some adherents, most philosophers were not convinced. We think that the consensus view that “ought” implies “can” is mistaken. In a psychological study to be published in the May issue of the journal Cognition, we offer empirical evidence suggesting that Professor Sinnott-Armstrong was right.


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Study finds palliative care reduces duration of radiotherapy and length of hospital stay

Study finds palliative care reduces duration of radiotherapy and length of hospital stay | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

A recent study by Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has found that people with advanced-stage cancer receiving palliative care needed shorter durations of radiation treatment and had shorter hospital stays.

According to a report on the Mount Sinai ‘Medicine Matters’ blog, the researchers evaluated 336 patients with stage IV cancer who were receiving radiation for symptomatic bone metastases. Of the 161 patients who received a combination of palliative care and short-course treatments (five or fewer sessions over the course of a week), the length of hospital stay declined by six days (from 18 to 12), the number of unfinished treatments dropped from 15 percent to 8 percent, and more patients accessed palliative care services within 30 days of finishing radiation (49 percent vs. 34 percent).

The study also reported a slight increase in the number of patients experiencing pain relief despite the reduction in radiotherapy.

Dr Kavita Dharmarajan, lead author of the study, said: “I feel strongly that as radiation oncologists, we can better serve these late-stage patients by treating them holistically, with radiation as well as non-radiation therapies, to manage their pain, nausea, fatigue, depression, and anxiety.”

You can read more about the research findings on the Mount Sinai ‘Medicine Matters’ blog.

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Hospice patients get too little care in last days of life, study says

One in eight hospice patients do not see a doctor, nurse, or social worker during their last two days of life, researchers for the federal agency responsible for the end-of-life programs found in a recent study.

The U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services changed its policies for hospice care payments for 2016 in order to encourage more visits toward the end of life, when the agency says families are most overwhelmed and patients often experience significant changes in symptoms and pain.

The change, effective Jan. 1, adds a "service intensity add-on payment" for up to four hours per day during the last seven days of life for a registered nurse or social worker, will address some of the problem, researchers said. Previously, Medicare paid a single rate per patient, regardless of how many times a medical professional visited them.


Via American Institute Health Care Professionals
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American Institute Health Care Professionals's curator insight, February 17, 9:19 AM

Good article about the need of better care for hospice patients in the final days of their lives.  This article analyzes a few issues.

If you would like to become certified in pastoral thanatology then please review the program

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Blog Jake | Jake donne la parole… à Giovanna Marsico

Blog Jake | Jake donne la parole… à Giovanna Marsico | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

La santé digitale : un vecteur puissant de changement Giovanna Marsico, avocate italienne, est à la tête de la plate-forme collaborative Cancer-Contribution.


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The impact of a new public health approach to end-of-life care: A systematic review

Background: Communities play an increasingly significant role in their own health and social care, and evidence demonstrates the positive impact of this work on a range of health outcomes. Interest is building regarding the application of the principles of the new public health approach to those facing the end of life and their families and communities.

Aim: To review the evidence relating to the impact of a new public health approach to end-of-life care, specifically as this applies to efforts to strengthen community action.

Design: A systematic review employing narrative synthesis. Both meta-ethnography and the use of descriptive statistics supported analysis.

Data sources: Eight databases (AMED, ASSIA, BiblioMap, CINAHL, Cochrane Reviews, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO) were searched from the earliest record to March 2015 using set eligibility criteria.

Results: Eight articles were included in the analysis. Three main themes emerged from the meta-ethnography: making a practical difference, individual learning and personal growth and developing community capacity. The quantitative findings mapped to the meta-ethnography and demonstrated that engaging communities can lead to improved outcomes for carers such as decreased fatigue or isolation, increase in size of caring networks and that wider social networks can influence factors such as place of death and involvement of palliative care services.

Conclusion: Evidence exists for the impact of community engagement in end-of-life care. Impact assessment should be an integral part of future initiatives and policy makers should recognise that these approaches can influence complex issues such as carer support, community capacity, wellbeing and social isolation.

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It's Trust, Not Tech, That Really Engages Patients

It's Trust, Not Tech, That Really Engages Patients | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Human connections between those “doing the caring” and those “being cared for” are what healthcare is about.

Health information technology is seen by many in the U.S. healthcare industry as indispensable. To such true believers, it is impossible for providers to deliver high-quality healthcare without things like patient portals, cloud storage, and the ability to communicate with one’s doctor via e-mail. And absent these digital gizmos, it is impossible for patients to “engage” in their own healthcare…or so just about every pundit and patient engagement solution vendor would have you believe.


But I have to laugh as I sit in my wife’s hospital room in the Lung Center of the Philippines, located in Manila, Philippines, contemplating the fact that the only computer technology I have seen in the hospital is in Admitting and Billing. There, they track which room patients are in along with a running account of their list of charges much like a hotel. You see I needed to get an “extra pillow” and had to buy it from admitting.


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La "Robin Hood" della scienza, 47 milioni di articoli accademici pubblicati online

La "Robin Hood" della scienza, 47 milioni di articoli accademici pubblicati online | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Alexandra Elbakyan, una programmatrice kazaka stufa dei costi esorbitanti delle riviste scientifiche, ha fondato Sci-Hub. Dopo le denunce dell'editore
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Are Health-Related Tweets Evidence Based? Review and Analysis of Health-Related Tweets on Twitter

Are Health-Related Tweets Evidence Based? Review and Analysis of Health-Related Tweets on Twitter | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Background: Health care professionals are utilizing Twitter to communicate, develop disease surveillance systems, and mine health-related information. The immediate users of this health information is the general public, including patients. This necessitates the validation of health-related tweets by health care professionals to ensure they are evidence based and to avoid the use of noncredible information as a basis for critical decisions.

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate health-related tweets on Twitter for validity (evidence based) and to create awareness in the community regarding the importance of evidence-based health-related tweets.

Methods: All tweets containing health-related information in the Arabic language posted April 1-5, 2015, were mined from Twitter. The tweets were classified based on popularity, activity, interaction, and frequency to obtain 25 Twitter accounts (8 physician accounts, 10 nonofficial health institute accounts, 4 dietitian accounts, and 3 government institute accounts) and 625 tweets. These tweets were evaluated by 3 American Board–certified medical consultants and a score was generated (true/false) and interobserver agreement was calculated.

Results: A total of 625 health-related Arabic-language tweets were identified from 8 physician accounts, 10 nonofficial health institute accounts, 4 dietician accounts, and 3 government institute accounts. The reviewers labeled 320 (51.2%) tweets as false and 305 (48.8%) tweets as true. Comparative analysis of tweets by account type showed 60 of 75 (80%) tweets by government institutes, 124 of 201 (61.7%) tweets by physicians, and 42 of 101 (41.6%) tweets by dieticians were true. The interobserver agreement was moderate (range 0.78-0.22). More than half of the health-related tweets (169/248, 68.1%) from nonofficial health institutes and dietician accounts (59/101, 58.4%) were false. Tweets by the physicians were more likely to be rated “true” compared to other groups (P<.001).

ConclusionsApproximately half of the medical tweets from professional accounts on Twitter were found to be false based on expert review. Furthermore, most of the evidence-based health-related tweets are posted by government institutes and physicians.

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Scuola e appendimento: cosa dicono le neuroscienze. Giacomo Stella - Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia


Via Gianfranco Marini
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Gianfranco Marini's curator insight, February 26, 9:48 AM

Un Webinar tenuto da Giacomo Stella dell'Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia e pubblicato il 14/10/2015 sul canale YouTube del Liceo Colombo, nell'ambito del Progetto di formazione ex DM 762 e DD 760: "DSA: non si finisce mai di imparare". Il Webinar è organizzato dal Liceo C. Colombo.

Titolo del Webinar: "Scuola e apprendimento: cosa dicono le neuroscienze"

durata del video 2:01:05.

OBIETTIVO DEL WEBINAR

Fornire ai docenti le competenze necessarie per portare avanti con successo il processo di integrazione degli alunni con DSA. Gli argomenti trattati nbella conferenza sono: 

# lettura diagnosi e certificazioni,

# analisi dei punti di forza e di debolezza degli allievi,

# costruzione di PDP

# didattica multicanale,

# didattica specifica alternativa ,

# uso tecnologie,

# gestione valutazione


MIO GIUDIZIO

Giacomo Stella è uno dei più importanti specialisti italiani in materia, ha una notevole capacità oratoria ed è molto chiaro nelle sue spiegazioni, è capace di spaziare al di là dei temi strettamente legati ai DSA e alle neuroscienze. Le slide di accompagnamento aiutano a seguire il discorso.

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Les médicaments innovants sont trop chers : les inégalités de santé vont s'amplifier

Les médicaments innovants sont trop chers : les inégalités de santé vont s'amplifier | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
LE PLUS. L’accès de tous aux médicaments innovants est-il menacé ? Très coûteux, ces médicaments bénéficient pour l'heure d'un remboursement intégral par l'Assurance maladie. Mais les restrictions budgétaires pourraient bientôt changer la donne, et certains malades ne plus y avoir accès, craint Daniel Carré, membre de la Commission nationale des droits de l'homme (CNCDH).

Via Giovanna Marsico
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A Narrative Medicine "Closer" Close Reading Drill

A Narrative Medicine "Closer" Close Reading Drill | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

The narrative medicine course I teach at the University of Washington I have been using Rita Charon’s narrative medicine close reading drill (as described in her chapter “Close Reading” from her book Narrative Medicine: Honoring the Stories of Illness, Oxford University Press, 2006). I was taught this  narrative medicine close reading drill in the workshops I have taken with Dr. Charon at Columbia University.

As she writes in the opening of her chapter on close reading, “Narrative medicine makes the case that narrative training in reading and writing contributes to clinical effectiveness. By developing narrative competence, we have argued, health care professionals can become more attentive to patients, more attuned to patients’ experiences, more reflective in their own practice, and more accurate in interpreting the stories patients tell of illness” (pg 107).


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The decline and fall of medical writing

The decline and fall of medical writing | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

George Orwell said, “If people cannot write well, they cannot think well, and if they cannot think well, others will do their thinking for them.”  If Orwell was right, the profession of medicine and the patients it cares for could be in big trouble.  As a result of ongoing changes in healthcare, today’s medical students and residents are being asked to write much less than in the past, with a predictable decline in the quality of what they produce.  This, in turn, threatens the quality of patient care.

Recently one of our medical students, a very bright young man, submitted his first patient write-up.  He had spent several hours interviewing the patient, performing a physical exam, and recording his findings.  Inspecting his work, we told him, “This is not good medical writing.  What you have produced is not a note fit for a patient’s chart but a series of bullet points.”  He replied, “But that’s how I think — I think in bullet points.  Why should I write any differently?


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Ethical dilemma: When medical advances can prolong a patient's life even when there is no hope

In an opinion piece for CNN, Jacquelyn Corley, M.D., a neurological surgery resident at Duke University Medical Center, writes about her experience caring for a patient who was braindead but whose partner wanted doctors to continue medical treatment. One problem, she writes, is that medicine is so good that doctors can keep people alive in ways once thought impossible. However, there comes a time when the quality of life must also be considered, she says. "Doctors, nurses and others who devote their lives to taking care of very sick patients see it happen all the time: A patient's time has come, but the family just can't let go," she writes. And the family asks patients to take intensive measures that doctors would never want for themselves
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HOW MEDICINE IS GOING ONLINE

HOW MEDICINE IS GOING ONLINE | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Healthcare, just as education, has always posed a problem as everybody needs it but few get it and we are going to see how medicine is going online. The biggest problem of medicine and healthcare? Funding.

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Disparity in Life Spans of the Rich and the Poor Is Growing

Disparity in Life Spans of the Rich and the Poor Is Growing | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Experts have long known that rich people generally live longer than poor people. But a growing body of data shows a more disturbing pattern: Despite big advances in medicine, technology and education, the longevity gap between high-income and low-income Americans has been widening sharply.

The poor are losing ground not only in income, but also in years of life, the most basic measure of well-being. In the early 1970s, a 60-year-old man in the top half of the earnings ladder could expect to live 1.2 years longer than a man of the same age in the bottom half, according to an analysis by theSocial Security Administration. Fast-forward to 2001, and he could expect to live 5.8 years longer than his poorer counterpart.


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