Co-creation in health
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Co-creation in health
E-citizens, e-patients, communities in shaping e-health, health literacy.
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The Sorry State of Pharma Mobile Health Apps & What To Do About It

© 2015 Pharmaguy™ The Sorry State of Pharma Mobile Health Apps & What To Do About It PharmaGuy Social Media in the Pharmaceutical Industry 21 - 22 Jan 2015…
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Decision aids for people facing health treatment or screening decisions - The Cochrane Library

Decision aids to help people who are facing health treatment or screening decisions

Identifying and making a decision about the best health treatment or screening option can be difficult for patients. Decision aids can be used when there is more than one reasonable option, when no option has a clear advantage in terms of health outcomes, and when each option has benefits and harms that patients may value differently. Decision aids may be pamphlets, videos, or web-based tools. They make the decision explicit, describe the options available, and help people to understand these options as well as their possible benefits and harms. This helps patients to consider the options from a personal view (e.g., how important the possible benefits and harms are to them) and helps them to participate with their health practitioner in making a decision.

The updated review, with searches updated in June 2012, includes 115 studies involving 34,444 participants. Findings show that when patients use decision aids they: a) improve their knowledge of the options (high-quality evidence); b) feel more informed and more clear about what matters most to them (high-quality evidence); c) have more accurate expectations of possible benefits and harms of their options (moderate-quality evidence); and d) participate more in decision making (moderate-quality evidence). Patients who used decision aids that included an exercise to help them clarify what matters most to them, were more likely to reach decisions that were consistent with their values. However, the quality of the evidence was moderate for this outcome, meaning that further research may change these findings. Decision aids reduce the number of patients choosing prostate specific antigen testing and elective surgery when patients consider other options. They have a variable effect on most other actual choices. Decision aids improve communication between patients and their health practitioner. More detailed decision aids are better than simple decision aids for improving people's knowledge and lowering decisional conflict related to feeling uninformed and unclear about their personal values. Decision aids do not worsen health outcomes and people using them are not less satisfied. More research is needed to evaluate adherence with the chosen option, the associated costs, use with patients who have more limited reading skills, and the level of detail needed in a decision aid.

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Moving the Worksite Health Promotion Profession Forward

Abstract

Standards in any profession are adopted to assure that the individuals hired are adequately trained and the programs that they oversee are of the highest quality. Worksite health promotion should be no different from any other field. A review of the research conducted by experts in worksite health promotion is examined, along with an assessment of skills needed to ensure that wellness programs are effective and employees, their families, and even their communities are educated on the ways to best prevent chronic diseases and occupational incidences through healthy and safe behaviors. This article is consistent with Health Promotion Practice’s mission and focuses on the exploration of the processes used to plan effective worksite health promotion programs, and it suggests initial discussions on whether these processes should become standards for professionals in the worksite health promotion field.

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Social media in medical education - final deck for acehp15

This deck was used to support a session at the 2015 ACEhp meeting in Grapevine, Texas. I was joined on the panel by @theCMEguy and @medpedsdoctor
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What do doctors want from pharma websites?

What do doctors want from pharma websites? | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
POST SUMMARY: Physicians often visit pharma product websites and have specific information needs when it comes to prescription drug information. Doctor's and other HCP's often visit prescription dr...
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Twitter, le meilleur indicateur des maladies cardiaques ?

Twitter, le meilleur indicateur des maladies cardiaques ? | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Selon une étude de l'Université de Pennsylvanie, il serait de bon ton de regarder... Les tweets d'un patient pour déceler des futurs problèmes cardiaques.
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Why Physicians Are Afraid of Social Media and Why They Shouldn't Be

Why Physicians Are Afraid of Social Media and Why They Shouldn't Be | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Although more than 35 percent of American consumers research health conditions online before calling their doctor, many physicians are reluctant to market their services online. The reasons they give are as numerous as physicians themselves. However, we'll debunk a few of the more common ones.
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Searching social networks to detect adverse reactions

Searching social networks to detect adverse reactions | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Regulators and pharmaceutical companies are monitoring social media posts for potential adverse drug reaction signals.
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30-Year Sentence Lifted For Woman In El Salvador Abortion Case

Carmen Guadalupe Vasquez Aldana had steadfastly denied having an abortion. She said her unborn baby had died due to medical complications. This week, Congress pardoned her after seven years in jail.
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Marketing sociale e Comunicazione per la salute - Aprile 2015 -Newsletter 131 - #Socialmarketing

Marketing sociale e Comunicazione per la salute - Aprile 2015 -Newsletter 131 - #Socialmarketing | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
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Socioeconomic Deprivation and the Incidence of 12 Cardiovascular Diseases in 1.9 Million Women and Men: Implications for Risk Prediction and Prevention

Socioeconomic Deprivation and the Incidence of 12 Cardiovascular Diseases in 1.9 Million Women and Men: Implications for Risk Prediction and Prevention | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Background Recent experimental evidence suggests that socioeconomic characteristics of neighbourhoods influence cardiovascular health, but observational studies which examine deprivation across a wide range of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are lacking. Methods Record-linkage cohort study of 1.93 million people to examine the association between small-area socioeconomic deprivation and 12 CVDs. Health records covered primary care, hospital admissions, a myocardial infarction registry and cause-specific mortality in England (CALIBER). Patients were aged ≥30 years and were initially free of CVD. Cox proportional hazard models stratified by general practice were used. Findings During a median follow-up of 5.5 years 114,859 people had one of 12 initial CVD presentations. In women the hazards of all CVDs except abdominal aortic aneurysm increased linearly with higher small-area socioeconomic deprivation (adjusted HR for most vs. least deprived ranged from 1.05, 95%CI 0.83–1.32 for abdominal aortic aneurysm to 1.55, 95%CI 1.42–1.70 for heart failure; I 2 = 81.9%, τ 2 = 0.01). In men heterogeneity was higher (HR ranged from 0.89, 95%CI 0.75–1.06 for cardiac arrest to 1.85, 95%CI 1.67–2.04 for peripheral arterial disease; I 2 = 96.0%, τ 2 = 0.06) and no association was observed with stable angina, sudden cardiac death, subarachnoid haemorrhage, transient ischaemic attack and abdominal aortic aneurysm. Lifetime risk difference between least and most deprived quintiles was most marked for peripheral arterial disease in women (4.3% least deprived, 5.8% most deprived) and men (4.6% least deprived, 7.8% in most deprived); but it was small or negligible for sudden cardiac death, transient ischaemic attack, abdominal aortic aneurysm and ischaemic and intracerebral haemorrhage, in both women and men. Conclusions Associations of small-area socioeconomic deprivation with 12 types of CVDs were heterogeneous, and in men absent for several diseases. Findings suggest that policies to reduce deprivation may impact more strongly on heart failure and peripheral arterial disease, and might be more effective in women.
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Vidéo : Histoire de la médecine, de la relation patient - médecine, histoire d'une relation manquée

Jean-Pierre Peter, historien de la médecins, évoque dans ce documentaire réalisé par le CNRS l'évolution de la relation patient médecin et ses difficultés.


Via Renaloo, EVELYNE PIERRON
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Patient Opinion Leaders Are the New Healthcare Influencers

Patient Opinion Leaders Are the New Healthcare Influencers | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
The pharmaceutical industry has historically invested enormous amounts of money into identifying and engaging with those medical influencers who can potentially make or break its new therapies. These ‘super influencer’ doctors, known as Key Opinion Leaders are the ones other prescribers look to for guidance.
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ADULT OBESITY: New guidelines emphasize the role of family doctors in addressing Canada’s most pressing health challenge

ADULT OBESITY: New guidelines emphasize the role of family doctors in addressing Canada’s most pressing health challenge | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
New guidelines emphasize the role of family doctors in addressing Canada’s most pressing health challenge

Ottawa, 26 January, 2015–The Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Task Force) has issued its latest guidelines on adult obesity prevention and management. Adult obesity in Canada has nearly tripled in the past 40 years. Today 67% of men and 54% of women are considered overweight or obese making adult obesity one of Canada’s most pressing public health challenges. The Task Force’s guidelines provide evidence-based recommendations designed to help primary care doctors play a more integral role in the prevention and management of this growing problem. Guidelines are published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ).


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Infographic: Modern physicians go mobile

Infographic: Modern physicians go mobile | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Mobile is all the rage with physicians today, even inspiring new lab coats to accommodate their multiple devices.

Three out of four physicians are using mobile apps at work, according to a 2014 report by MedData Group. There are now more than 10,000 apps available in the healthcare category, as physicians use mobile to save time, lower costs, and improve their quality of care.

With "three screen use" (tablets, smartphone and PCs) becoming the norm to help physician's research new technology and access specialty-quality content, we wanted to know what the most important app features are for physicians. We conducted a survey to find out which functionalities were most important to them when using mobile apps to access their Elsevier journal content. This infographic includes results from that survey.

Methods

Our goal was to create a survey that covered many specialties, Elsevier titles, and competitor analysis. We received over 160 responses from around the world, including users from Scotland, India, Egypt and the Ukraine. They identified four key areas for improvement, and we will use these results to benchmark performance over time. This survey also complimented qualitative data that was gathered from user interviews.

Summary of results

  • Physicians are 250 percent more likely to own a tablet than other consumers, and 76 percent of physicians use mobile at work to access work related content. They say it helps them save time, lower costs and generally offer improved quality of care.
  • The top three uses of journal mobile apps are:
    • The ability to read journals anytime, anywhere, with or without online access.
    • The ability to view and share images, including the pinch and zoom feature to get a closer look.
    • To access and download PDFs.
  • Medical journals remain the No. 1 source of information for physicians, and apps bring new advantages to the table and enhance the journal experience. For instance, mobile apps allow the user to watch videos or "pinch and zoom" on an image or chart/graph for a better look. The app also allows easy access to archival issues and includes search to physicians can read up on a particular topic that is of interest to them. With mobile apps, physicians can take notes and highlight articles, then share those articles and notes with colleagues, either via email or through social media. The ability to add rich interactive content, such as videos is another major advantage over traditional paper formats.

The infographic

We created this infographic to help physicians who haven't made the switch understand why their colleagues are using mobile—and for those who do to get the most out of their mobile app experience.



Via Plus91
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Kanti Kumar's curator insight, February 1, 2015 9:32 AM

It's encouraging that healthcare apps are becoming common and that physicians are using mobile apps at work. They should, but this survey is limited to the topic of their accessing journals on mobile devices for reading and sharing. What's not clear is how much they use mobile devices for delivering healthcare services.

Jerome Leleu's curator insight, February 7, 2015 1:26 AM

ajouter votre aperçu ...

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Why Pharma companies fail to have an impact on the mHealth app economy

Why Pharma companies fail to have an impact on the mHealth app economy | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Even though they try hard, most of the Pharma companies fail to have a significant impact on the mHealth app market. Some Pharma companies have published more
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Is Social Media the New Doppler Radar for Tracking Diseases?

Is Social Media the New Doppler Radar for Tracking Diseases? | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Is Social Media the New Doppler Radar for Tracking Diseases? Figuring out how to harness the data maybe the key to making social media work for healthcare.
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Personalised prevention: Where is it?

Personalised prevention: Where is it? | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Digital Health Futurist Maneesh Juneja explores whether personalised prevention should be getting more attention than it is.
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6 Things the Most Influential People on Social Media Do

6 Things the Most Influential People on Social Media Do | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
How do you earn respect, stand out, and get noticed in noisy social-media circles? Take a cue from the Web's biggest influencers.
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Les médicaments sont la troisième cause de décès

Les médicaments sont la troisième cause de décès | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Serment d'hypocrite ou serment d’Hippocrate? La médecine est-elle réellement là pour nous soigner à l'heure actuelle ou pour faire du profit, de l'argent quitte à tuer les patients? Et tous les dom...
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Cost-Effectiveness of a Community-Based Weight Control Intervention Targeting a Low-Socioeconomic Status

Introduction. The objective of our study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a community-based intervention designed to improve physical activity levels and dietary intake and to reduce diabetes risk in a largely Hispanic population residing along the U.S.-Mexico border. Method. We forecasted disease outcomes, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained, and lifetime costs associated with actual and projected attainment of 2% and 5% weight loss taking a societal cost perspective. We extrapolated changes in beverage calorie consumption between baseline and 6-month follow-up to attain projected weight loss measures. Outcomes were projected 5, 10, and 20 years into the future and discounted at a 3.0% rate. Results. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $57,430 and $61,893, respectively, per QALY gained when compared with usual care for the 2% and 5% weight loss scenarios. The intervention was particularly cost-effective for morbidly obese participants. Cost-effectiveness improves when using 3-year weight loss projections based on changes in sugar-sweetened beverage caloric consumption to $49,478 and $24,092 for the 2% and 5% weight loss scenarios. Conclusions. This analysis demonstrates that a culturally sensitive community-based weight loss and maintenance intervention can be cost-effective even when healthy weight individuals participate.

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This Device Could Make Effective, Drug-Free Pain Management Accessible To Everyone

This Device Could Make Effective, Drug-Free Pain Management Accessible To Everyone | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Neurostimulation could heal migraines and other kinds of pain. But until now it involved a risky surgery. Now a new device may make it more widespread.

Via Philippe Marchal
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Patient Opinion Leaders (POLs): Influential Patient KOLs - ThinkPatient

Patient Opinion Leaders (POLs): Influential Patient KOLs - ThinkPatient | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Patient opinion leaders (POLs) are influential patients who share disease info and emotional support. POLs can also influence the shaping of health policy.
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