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Co-creation in health
E-citizens, e-patients, communities in shaping e-health, health literacy.
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Can Compassion Change the World?

Can Compassion Change the World? | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

By Jill Suttie

Daniel Goleman talks with Greater Good about his new book, A Force for Good: The Dalai Lama's Vision for Our World.


The Dalai Lama has a long history of meeting and collaborating with social scientists—psychologists, neuroscientists, economists, and others looking to understand the science of human emotions and behavior. Through these collaborations, he has learned about the research in this area and has encouraged scientists to pursue fields of inquiry more directly aimed at serving the public good.

Via Edwin Rutsch
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Wired fa luce sulla roulette russa della sanità italiana - Wired

Wired fa luce sulla roulette russa della sanità italiana - Wired | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Il nostro sistema sanitario è uno dei migliori del mondo ma se capiti nell'ospedale sbagliato le tue chance di morire possono essere anche cinque volte più alte della media nazionale per il medesimo intervento. In arrivo online l'applicazione di Wired per navigare tutti i dati
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Manovre di disostruzione, pochi corsi e cari

Manovre di disostruzione, pochi corsi e cari | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
È ottima l’iniziativa del Ministero della Salute di dedicare un giorno – il 23 aprile – alle manovre di disostruzione pediatrica. Se più diffuse, queste manovre potrebbero salvare un bambino a settimana, che oggi muore soffocato per aver ingerito un alimento o un oggetto (solo nel 25% dei casi) rimasto incastrato nelle vie respiratorie. È dunque ora di sensibilizzare ulteriormente le persone – i famigliari e il personale scolastico, ma chiunque possa trovarsi nella situazione di aiutare un bambino in difficoltà – sull’importanza di apprendere queste manovre non proprio semplici, soprattutto se da attuare sul piccolo corpo di un bimbo.
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The Future of Knowledge Sharing in a Digital Age: Exploring Impacts and Policy Implications for Development

The Future of Knowledge Sharing in a Digital Age: Exploring Impacts and Policy Implications for Development | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

We live in a Digital Age that gives us instant access to information at greater and greater volumes. The rapid growth of digital content and tools is already changing how we create, consume and distribute knowledge. Even though globally participation in the Digital Age remains uneven, more and more people are accessing and contributing digital content every day.

Over the next 15 years, developing countries are likely to experience sweeping changes in how states and societies engage with knowledge. These changes hold the potential to improve people’s lives by making information more available, increasing avenues for political and economic engagement, and making government more transparent and responsive. But they also carry dangers of a growing knowledge divide influenced by technology access, threats to privacy, and the potential loss of diversity of knowledge.

Our research sets out with a 15-year horizon to look at the possible ways in which digital technologies might contribute to or damage development agendas, and how development practitioners and policymakers might best respond.


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What You Need To Know About Knowledge Management

What You Need To Know About Knowledge Management | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Knowledge Management may sound intimidating, but you’d be surprised at how many of us are already following it’s principles every day at our organizations.  Knowledge Management (KM) is about connecting different sectors and ideas by making sure that the right people, processes, and technology are in place to support knowledge exchange.
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Doctor on Demand: Medicine at your fingertips

Doctor on Demand: Medicine at your fingertips | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Jim Cramer has spent a lot of time recently discussing health care stocks, specifically the cost containment plays, because he thinks they are in the perfect sweet spot for the current market.

When he refers to controlling health care costs, he is referring to those companies that can use their scale to negotiate reduced prices with drugmakers and hospitals. Sometimes, in order to get a better understanding of a theme, it requires going off the tape to highlight privately held companies that are pioneering the way.


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Want to Connect with Today’s Empowered Patients? Be an Empowered Doctor - MediBeauty Today

Want to Connect with Today’s Empowered Patients? Be an Empowered Doctor - MediBeauty Today | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Picture the following scenario: A new patient comes into your office wanting to know about a new miracle procedure she recently heard about on Facebook or Twitter. You spend most of the ensuing consultation trying to counter socially driven misinformation with medically based facts only to have her leave in search of a provider who will tell her what she wants to hear.

If that scenario sounds familiar, it seems you have plenty of company. Surveying 128 plastic surgeons in 19 countries, the UK-based Aesthetic Plastic Surgery journal found that most respondents believed that patients were more likely to have unrealistic expectations due to social media

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Falling in love and crying in the academic workplace: “Professionalism”, gender and emotion.

Falling in love and crying in the academic workplace: “Professionalism”, gender and emotion. | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Tim Hunt’s remarks on women in science provide a sobering reminder on the everyday reality of systemic bias in the academic workplace. Rachel Moss writes that alongside sexism there is a deeper issue at play, which is about how professionalism itself is socially codified in academia. The “ideal” worker is intellectually engaged and rigorous, but emotionally restrained. But individuals do not necessarily fit into such neat boxes. No one was made to live within the narrow confines of a single role.

I’m currently tinkering with the final edits to an article on male swooning in Middle English romance. Medieval romances are full of fainting men: swooning from lovesickness, losing consciousness after battle, collapsing on receipt of bad news about beloved companions. In the middle ages, it seemed to me that swooning and weeping could be used as proofs of hypermasculinity – and so an article was born. Some of you have heard it in a protoform at a couple of different conferences, and according to the journal editors, it’s almost ready to go out into the world: pages of virile men collapsing on the battlefield, in the forest and at court.

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Parkinson's For One Day

Parkinson's For One Day | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
My new job is wonderfully immersive. I leave home early, come back late, and, in between, spend hours talking with people about the future of health, health care, and technology (broadly defined). ...
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Closing the Gender Gap on the Farm Could End World Hunger

Closing the Gender Gap on the Farm Could End World Hunger | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

There’s a scene in Mad Max: Fury Road where a gray-haired woman opens a worn leather satchel to reveal the most valuable possession imaginable in that apocalyptically bleak, water-starved world: seeds. And while real life is not a summer blockbuster, the status of global food security—and the question of who controls it—is strikingly similar.

“Women hold the keys to food security,” Chilean President Michelle Bachelet said at the opening of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations’ 39th conference on Saturday. Empowering rural women, she said, combats hunger. But what does gender equity have to do with hunger? If poverty is sexist, is hunger sexist too?


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Richard Smith: Time for GPs to be leaders not victims

Richard Smith: Time for GPs to be leaders not victims | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

General practitioners are overworked, underappreciated, and perhaps underpaid. Politicians are unsympathetic to their plight and expecting more of them. Hospital doctors dump work on them. Nurses are after their jobs. Patients are demanding and ungrateful. Bureaucrats and regulators are making their professional lives a misery. General practitioners have replaced farmers as the profession that complains the most.

I have no sympathy for them. I want them to stop being victims and become leaders, people who solve problems rather than complain about them and expect others to solve them. I’ve preached this message to meetings of GPs several times in the past, which has not made me popular, but the current orgy of moaning has urged me to put finger to iPad.


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Las asociaciones de pacientes en las redes sociales

Las asociaciones de pacientes en las redes sociales | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

En un post anterior abordé la relación entre los médicos y la industria farmacéutica con las redes sociales. En esta ocasión les toca a las asociaciones de pacientes, que han visto en ellas una palanca fundamental para ampliar su alcance e impacto. Estas organizaciones mantienen una elevada interacción en los canales digitales (diálogo y relación), ya que actúan en la red como lo hacen a diario en su trabajo cara a cara con los pacientes y el resto de la ciudadanía.

Se ha hablado mucho del paciente empoderado y recientemente un compañero lo hacía sobre un informe que revela la apuesta por eHealth de los mayores cuando los beneficios  están claros. Emerge un nuevo perfil y, por eso, no nos sorprenden los resultados del II Sondeo de Asociaciones de Pacientes en la Red 2.0 de Pfizer, que revelan que la gran mayoría de las asociaciones de pacientes considera que su presencia en Internet no es una opción, sino una necesidad. Una mayor visibilidad, más proximidad a los ciudadanos y una mejor comunicación con los socios son las principales razones de su presencia digital.


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Use of Social Media in Health Promotio Purposes, Key Performance Indicators, and Evaluation Metrics

Despite the expanding use of social media, little has been published about its appropriate role in health promotion, and even less has been written about evaluation. The purpose of this article is threefold: (a) outline purposes for social media in health promotion, (b) identify potential key performance indicators associated with these purposes, and (c) propose evaluation metrics for social media related to the key performance indicators. Process evaluation is presented in this article as an overarching evaluation strategy for social media.

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All of The Social Media Metrics that Matter | Sprout Social

All of The Social Media Metrics that Matter | Sprout Social | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
There are hundreds of social media metrics to be analyzed. Here we look at the top social networks and which matter most for your business.
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Drug Effectiveness Should Determine Drug Prices, Not Drug Discovery Costs

Drug Effectiveness Should Determine Drug Prices, Not Drug Discovery Costs | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Ever wonder how much it costs to develop a new drug? The independent, non-profit research group, The Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development, estimates US$2.6 billion, almost double the centre’s previous estimate a decade ago. But how accurate is this figure?


While the details of the study remain a secret, a press release, slideshow and background document on the Tufts website provide some insight into how this figure was calculated. Interestingly, only slightly more than half of this cost is directly related to research and development (R&D). US$1.2 billion are “time costs” – returns that investors might have made if their money wasn’t tied up in developing a particular drug.


So why is this debate important and why does it matter whether or not these estimate are correct?


These costs are used to justify high drug prices. These prices increasingly have the potential to disable health-care systems, create enormous opportunity costs (as funds that could be spent on other goods and services are diverted to purchase more and more expensive drugs), and place medicines out of reach of all but the most wealthy individuals or governments.


This is a reminder that the real issue is not how much it costs to develop a drug, but whether or not these drugs are worth the high prices pharmaceutical companies charge for them.


While advocates of a completely free market might see “just” pricing and all forms of price control as “medieval”, “socialist” or as suppressing innovation, others worry that drug prices bear little, if any, correlation with actual clinical value.


Rewarding innovation is necessary, but allowing drugs to be priced according to whatever the market will bear, rather than according to their benefits and cost-effectiveness, leads to inefficiencies, inequities and dramatic global inconsistencies.


Via Pharma Guy
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Pharma Guy's curator insight, June 17, 1:00 PM

The debate continues! I was wondering how long it would take to rebuke Tufts estimate. Read La Mattina's piece: "Do R&D Costs Matter When It Comes To Drug Pricing?" http://onforb.es/1JGqtKr 


Here's Avorn's NEJM Perspective piece: "The $2.6 Billion Pill — Methodologic and Policy Considerations"; http://bit.ly/1ISWv5l 


And Tufts rebuttal: "The Cost of Drug Development"; http://bit.ly/1Hyrfqv

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A New Theory of Distraction - The New Yorker

A New Theory of Distraction - The New Yorker | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

At painful times, when composition is impossible and reading is not enough, grammars and dictionaries are excellent for distraction,” the poet Elizabeth Barrett Browning wrote, in 1839. Those were the days. Browning is still right, of course: ask any reader of Wikipedia or Urban Dictionary. She sounds anachronistic only because no modern person needs advice about how to be distracted. Like typing, Googling, and driving, distraction is now a universal competency. We’re all experts.

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Your 'patient engagement strategy' is embarrassing #hcsmeu

Your 'patient engagement strategy' is embarrassing #hcsmeu | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

"To talk of ‘the patient’ is antithetical to everything that participatory medicine is doing. Objectifying the person as ‘the patient’ takes you farther away from each individual’s needs, setting you apart from what is relevant and useful to the person-as-a-patient rather than bringing you closer together.

‘Focusing on the patient,’ being ‘patient-centric’, or whatever other handwave you use in your promotional material in an attempt to signify your earnestness simply isn’t enough — for the patient, or for you as a pharmaceutical company, service provider, or clinician."


Via VAB Traductions, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Alexandre Gultzgoff's curator insight, June 17, 9:35 AM

even more true for vaccine business...

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Annual Report to the Nation. The most common cancers in the United States.

Annual Report to the Nation. The most common cancers in the United States. | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
The Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011, is an update of rates for new cases, deaths and trends for the most common cancers in the United States.
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How women contribute $3 trillion to global healthcare

How women contribute $3 trillion to global healthcare | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

The traditional focus on women’s health tends to emphasise only their healthcare needs. But women are important providers – as much as they are recipients – of healthcare in their homes and wider communities. This involvement is undervalued economically, politically and culturally.

Data analysed from 32 countries, constituting about 52% of the world’s population, and reported in the Lancet Commission on Women and Health, shows that women contribute around US$3 trillion in healthcare annually. The report is the culmination of three years work and represents an important milestone in the consideration of some of the key issues affecting women and their role in society.

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How accurate are the tests in people like me? - Smart Health Choices - PubMed Health

How accurate are the tests in people like me? - Smart Health Choices - PubMed Health | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Diagnostic tests almost always involve some inaccuracy. As a result of this, a positive test result does not necessarily mean that you definitely have the disease, nor does a negative result mean that you definitely do not have the disease; there will always be some false-positive and some false-negative test results.

Say you decide to have a test for an infection. If the result is positive, you may have, for example, only a 60 per cent chance of having the infection – or a 90 per cent chance – depending on the test’s accuracy. (In other words 40 per cent – or 10 per cent – will be false-positive results.) If the test is negative, however, you still have a chance of having the infection – perhaps somewhere between a 5 and a 15 per cent chance. This is why it is important to find out, in terms of probabilities, exactly what the test results might mean in your case. If your practitioner simply says the result means that you are at ‘low risk’ or ‘high risk’, you may understand these terms very differently from your practitioner, whereas it is much clearer if you are told you have a ‘10 per cent’ or a ‘95 per cent’ risk.


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Choosing Wisely in the UK: the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges’ initiative to reduce the harms of too much medicine

Choosing Wisely in the UK: the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges’ initiative to reduce the harms of too much medicine | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

The idea that some medical procedures are unnecessary and can do more harm than good is as old as medicine itself. In Mesopotamia 38 centuries ago, Hammurabi proclaimed a law threatening overzealous surgeons with the loss of a hand or an eye. In 1915, at the height of a surgical vogue for prophylactic appendicectomy, Ernest Codman offended his Boston colleagues with a cartoon (figure) mocking their indifference to outcomes and asking, “I wonder if clinical truth is incompatible with medical science? Could my clinical professors make a living without humbug?” Looking at the rates of tonsillectomy in London boroughs in the 1930s, John Alison Glover discovered that they were entirely governed by the policy of school doctors and bore no relation to need or outcomes.1 John (Jack) Wennberg established the science of outcomes research when in 1973 he described patterns of gross variation in the use of medical and surgical procedures in the United States, which lacked any clinical rationale but was closely related to supply.2

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Una dose di razionalità sui vaccini | Alessia Melegaro e Marcello Tirani

Una dose di razionalità sui vaccini | Alessia Melegaro e Marcello Tirani | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

La prevenzione delle malattie attraverso i vaccini è una delle conquiste più importanti della sanità pubblica. Arriveranno presto sul mercato molti nuovi prodotti, alcuni davvero utili per la salute, altri meno. Su che basi decidere quali accettare? Ripercussioni sulle vaccinazioni tradizionali.


Tanti vaccini in arrivo

La prevenzione delle malattie attraverso gli interventi di vaccinazione è comunemente ritenuta una delle maggiori conquiste di sanità pubblica del XX secolo. Ogni anno, più di 100 milioni di bambini vengono vaccinati in tutto il mondo, permettendo di evitare circa 2,5 milioni di morti. I programmi vaccinali hanno condotto all’eradicazione del vaiolo, alla quasi raggiunta eradicazione della polio, alla riduzione del 75 per cento delle morti causate da morbillo.

Tuttavia, stiamo assistendo a una nuova e profonda rivoluzione nel campo dell’offerta vaccinale che merita di essere attentamente considerata. Nel prossimo decennio saranno immessi sul mercato circa 250-270 vaccini, contro malattie – infettive e non – di primaria importanza pubblica, che oggi si trovano nelle diverse fasi dei trial clinici (per esempio, Hiv, malaria, dengue, epatite C, Alzheimer, carcinoma pancreatico, cancro ovarico, melanoma). Alcuni avranno forse uno scarso impatto di salute pubblica, ma altri garantiranno la possibilità di combattere patologie molto importanti, rappresentando in alcuni casi una vera e propria svolta epocale nell’ambito della prevenzione.

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