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What patients can learn from public hospital ratings

What patients can learn from public hospital ratings | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Many public hospital ratings use data collected from hospital experience surveys, but patients rarely have much access to credible reviews for their doctors.
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Co-creation in health
E-citizens, e-patients, communities in shaping e-health, health literacy.
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Book Review: Ethnography for the Internet: Embedded, Embodied and Everyday

Book Review: Ethnography for the Internet: Embedded, Embodied and Everyday | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Ethnographers of contemporary Internet-infused societies consequently find themselves facing serious methodological dilemmas: where should they go, what should they do there and how can they acquire robust knowledge about what people do in, through and with the internet? Casey Brienza thinksEthnography for the Internet is both a challenging and magisterial book by a scholar working at the fullest extent of her powers.
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Patenting of life-saving drugs has created a global health crisis where human life has become a commercial commodity.

Patenting of life-saving drugs has created a global health crisis where human life has become a commercial commodity. | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Millions of people—mostly in developing countries—lack access to life-saving drugs. Righting this imbalance is among the most important challenges of global public health of this century, argues Akansha Mehta. There is scant evidence to prove that frameworks for intellectual property rights and patent protection have benefited research, development and innovation in developing countries. When the laws of trade and commerce override the human right to life-saving medicines, how can society protect public health from unbridled private markets?
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Health Literacy Toolkit for Low- and Middle- Income Countries

Health Literacy Toolkit for Low- and Middle- Income Countries | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

The Health Literacy Toolkit was launched at the World Congress of Public Health in Kolkata, India. Health literacy is at the heart of what enables people to understand and engage in health actions and care – from lifesaving treatment, to understanding that smoking is dangerous for one’s health and how to prevent disease.

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Cochrane for Clinicians: Exercise is an Effective Intervention in Overweight and Obese Patients - American Family Physician

Cochrane for Clinicians: Exercise is an Effective Intervention in Overweight and Obese Patients - American Family Physician | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Exercise leads to a weight loss of 1 lb, 2 oz to 16 lb, 12 oz (0.5 to 7.6 kg), compared with a 3-oz (0.1-kg) weight loss to a weight gain of 1 lb, 9 oz (0.7 kg) with no treatment. Patients participating in higher-intensity exercise lose 3 lb, 5 oz (1.5 kg) more than those participating in low-intensity exercise. Regardless of whether the patient loses weight, exercise improves diastolic blood pressure and triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein, and glucose levels. When a low-calorie diet is compared with exercise alone, a low-calorie diet leads to more weight loss (6 lb, 3 oz to 29 lb, 16 oz [2.8 to 13.6 kg] versus 1 lb, 2 oz to 16 lb, 12 oz). However, trials with three to 12 months of follow-up show that participants who combine a low-calorie diet with exercise lose 2 lb, 7 oz (1.1 kg) more than those who only diet.
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The imperative of public health: opportunity or trap? Ilona Kickbusch

When the Ottawa Charter in 1986 had called on health promoters ‘to advocate for a clear political commitment to health and equity in all sectors’, foreign policy was not on the agenda. This changed as health promotion began to concern itself with the impact of globalization on health. Indeed, the recommendations from the 2nd international health promotion conference with a focus on ‘healthy public policy’ in Adelaide 1988 already stated: ‘in view of the large health gaps between countries, which this conference has examined, the developed countries have an obligation to ensure that their own policies have a positive health impact on developing nations. The conference recommends that all countries develop healthy public policies that explicitly address this issue’. That is a political agenda.

Twenty years later, a group of seven foreign ministers from around the world—Brazil, France, Indonesia, Norway, Senegal, South Africa and Thailand—declared global health a goal of foreign policy: ‘We believe that health is one of the most important, yet still broadly neglected, long-term foreign policy issues of our time. ...We believe that health as a foreign policy issue needs a stronger strategic focus on the international agenda. We have therefore agreed to make impact on health a point of departure and a defining lens that each of our countries will use to examine key elements of foreign policy and development strategies, and to engage in a dialogue on how to deal with policy options from this perspective’ (Oslo Ministerial Declaration, 2007).

On the most part the responses of global health advocates to this initiative have been positive—after all the explicit goal of the new public health is to have health high on the agenda of policy makers, to integrate health into as many policy arenas as possible and to move it from ‘low’ to ‘high’ …

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Avoid Social Media Sins in Healthcare

Avoid Social Media Sins in Healthcare | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

The minute Laura met Casey, she was smitten. The tow-haired little boy captured her heart as soon as she walked into his hospital room. He seemed so small sitting in his hospital bed, reading to his stuffed rabbit. Laura was a semester away from graduating from nursing school and had been scared to start her pediatrics rotation because she had never been around children. Casey’s infectious smile tugged at her heartstrings, and she soon loved most aspects of pediatric nursing. She had found her niche.

Even when she wasn’t assigned to Casey, she tried to stop in to visit with him and his family. He adored Laura, too, and his parents enjoyed the attention she gave him. She popped her head in to say hi one morning and she noticed how exhausted Casey’s mom looked. Laura offered to stay with Casey for a few minutes while his mom ran to the cafeteria. Casey’s mom was thrilled, of course, and happily agreed. Casey was doing better; he would be going home soon, and her clinicals were coming to an end. She would miss him. To capture the moment, Laura asked a fellow student nurse to take their picture. The friend obliged, and Laura posted the sweet pic on Facebook that night – complete with caption, “I’m gonna miss this little guy –graduation is just 23 days away!”


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Moderate drinking in pregnancy 'harms IQ' - BBC News

Moderate drinking in pregnancy 'harms IQ' - BBC News | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Drinking just one or two glasses of wine a week in pregnancy can have an impact on a child's IQ, a study says.
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Social Media in Healthcare

Social Media in Healthcare | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Social media has the potential to enhance collaborative care, according to a new infographic by CitiusTech.

The infographic details which sites are accessed most for health related information, key healthcare social media indicators and powerful healthcare use cases driven by social media.


Via Plus91, Rémy TESTON, Philippe Marchal/Pharma Hub
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Why Nice Doctors Are Better Doctors - US News

Why Nice Doctors Are Better Doctors - US News | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

By Elizabeth Renter


It’s All About Empathy
In looking at bedside manner, modern practitioners are zeroing in on empathy. A paper in the International Journal of Caring Sciences describes empathy as “the ‘capacity’ to share and understand another’s ‘state of mind’ or emotion” and a “powerful communication skill” that uses active listening and deepens understanding. This skill allows some doctors to fully grasp your apprehensions, concerns and the true weight of your questions when you’re in the examining room or hospital.

Your doctor’s empathy, or the ability to stand in your shoes, not only deepens the relationship between the two of you and makes you feel more satisfied with your visit, but also has measurable effects on your health.


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Twitter makes me a better doctor: 4 reasons why I use Twitter

Twitter makes me a better doctor: 4 reasons why I use Twitter | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

I continue to hear doubts echoing from my fellow medical students, residents, and attendings, particularly about the use of Twitter.

Many of them ask how using Twitter has benefited me, and my answer almost always makes them stop and think.

My life has been enriched by the network of intelligent and forward-thinking people I have connected with on Twitter–many of them medical students, doctors, nurses, pharmacists, or other professionals who have made the leap into social media.

I have become a more well-rounded person and a more knowledgeable and confident future physician–and I’ve learned so much.

Why should medical professionals consider joining the Twitterverse?

The following are just a few reasons.


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Günter Grass s'entretient avec Pierre Bourdieu

Günter Grass s'entretient avec Pierre Bourdieu | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Hommage à Günter Grass avec la diffusion d'un entretien exceptionnel datant de 1999 entre l'écrivain allemand et le sociologue français Pierre Bourdieu. Cette rencontre donnera lieu à de nombreux échanges sur le monde du XXe siècle et ses vicissitudes. Une véritable leçon d'Histoire.

Via Luis Manuel
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Le nouveau site de CANCER CONTRIBUTION c'est par ici .... - cinema-cannes-cancer.com

Le nouveau site de CANCER CONTRIBUTION c'est par ici .... - cinema-cannes-cancer.com | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

La Mission L’idée originale Cancercontribution.fr est une plateforme qui réunit les acteurs concernés par le cancer (patients, médecins, responsables politiques, monde associatif, citoyens).


Via Giovanna Marsico
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Blood test predicts future breast cancer risk - Futurity

Blood test predicts future breast cancer risk - Futurity | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

A new test that analyzes all compounds (metabolites) in a blood sample can predict with 80 percent accuracy the likelihood a woman will develop breast cancer within the next two to five years.

While the new method, called a metabolic blood profile, is not perfect, says Rasmus Bro, a professor of chemometrics at the University of Copenhagen, it appears to offer some advantages over mammography, which can detect newly developed breast cancer with a sensitivity of 75 percent.

“The method is better than mammography, which can only be used when the disease has already occurred,” says Bro, who stresses that the method has been tested and validated only for a single population (cohort) and needs to be validated more widely before it can be used practically.

Nevertheless, the method could create a paradigm shift in early diagnosis of breast cancer as well as other diseases.

“The potential is that we can detect a disease like breast cancer much earlier than today. This is important as it is easier to treat if you discover it early,” says Lars Ove Dragsted, a professor of biomedicine.

The method was developed in cooperation with the Danish Cancer Society, and the study was recently published in Metabolomics.

Holistic approach

The new approach involves analyzing all compounds in a blood sample instead of a single biomarker.

“When a huge amount of relevant measurements from many individuals is used to assess health risks—here, breast cancer—it creates very high quality information. The more measurements our analyses contain, the better the model handles complex problems,” explains Bro."


Via Susan Zager
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Susan Zager's curator insight, April 17, 3:52 PM

This has only been studied on a small cohort but the concept should be looked at with a larger study. nload-v2.springer.com/static/pdf/829/art%253A10.1007%252Fs11306-015-0793-8.pdf?token2=exp=1429294699~acl=%2Fstatic%2Fpdf%2F829%2Fart%25253A10.1007%25252Fs11306-015-0793-8.pdf*~hmac=8d0728ba1061ba050a7cc70bf874898743170ab85d01188834e36ae5e8c76e28


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Should Patients Be Able to Find Organ Donors on Facebook?

Should Patients Be Able to Find Organ Donors on Facebook? | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
A recent case in Belgium, in which a man took to social media to ask for a kidney, is raising questions about who can ethically donate.

Via Philippe Marchal/Pharma Hub
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Environmental advocates and tobacco control advocates share a common history, and can learn from each others struggles and successes.

Environmental advocates and tobacco control advocates share a common history, and can learn from each others struggles and successes. | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
The tobacco control and environmental rights movements have often shared a common purpose and maintain a shared history. The clean indoor air movement that started in the 1970s aimed to ban tobacco smoking in public places and shared philosophy and personnel with those who fought for clean air and drinking water during the same era. The tobacco industry and its products continue to cause major ecological damage. The extent of this damage caused largely by unsustainable farming practices and product litter is detailed throughout the Tobacco Atlas. Moreover, finding solutions to these problems will require enlisting the aid of and working with those who advocate on behalf of our environment.
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Demographic and Epidemiologic Drivers of Global Cardiovascular Mortality — NEJM

Demographic and Epidemiologic Drivers of Global Cardiovascular Mortality — NEJM | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Globally, deaths from cardiovascular and circulatory diseases are increasing.1 This increase represents the combined effect of population growth, the aging of populations, and epidemiologic changes in cardiovascular disease. It is important to disentangle these drivers of the observed trends in global mortality for a number of reasons. First, regional and national investments in cardiovascular health can target only the epidemiologic causes of cardiovascular disease. Second, understanding the roles and relative magnitude of these demographic and epidemiologic trends is important in planning for the health care system and in developing policy. Third, the effects of the aging and growth of the population should be excluded when progress toward the goal set by the United Nations for a 25% reduction in premature mortality due to cardiovascular disease by the year 2025 is benchmarked.2,3
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From work with men and boys to changes of social norms and reduction of inequities in gender relations: a conceptual shift in prevention of violence against women and girls - The Lancet

From work with men and boys to changes of social norms and reduction of inequities in gender relations: a conceptual shift in prevention of violence against women and girls - The Lancet | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Violence perpetrated by and against men and boys is a major public health problem. Although individual men's use of violence differs, engagement of all men and boys in action to prevent violence against women and girls is essential. We discuss why this engagement approach is theoretically important and how prevention interventions have developed from treating men simply as perpetrators of violence against women and girls or as allies of women in its prevention, to approaches that seek to transform the relations, social norms, and systems that sustain gender inequality and violence. We review evidence of intervention effectiveness in the reduction of violence or its risk factors, features commonly seen in more effective interventions, and how strong evidence-based interventions can be developed with more robust use of theory. Future interventions should emphasise work with both men and boys and women and girls to change social norms on gender relations, and need to appropriately accommodate the differences between men and women in the design of programmes.

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Twitter Journal Clubs for Health Care Providers: A Systematic Review

Twitter Journal Clubs for Health Care Providers: A Systematic Review | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

BackgroundJournal clubs are an essential tool in promoting clinical evidence-based medical education to all medical and allied health professionals. Twitter represents a public, microblogging forum that can facilitate traditional journal club requirements, while also reaching a global audience, and participation for discussion with study authors and colleagues.


ObjectiveThe aim of the current study was to evaluate the current state of social media–facilitated journal clubs, specifically Twitter, as an example of continuing professional development.


MethodsA systematic review of literature databases (Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Web of Science, ERIC via ProQuest) was performed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. A systematic search of Twitter, the followers of identified journal clubs, and Symplur was also performed. Demographic and monthly tweet data were extracted from Twitter and Symplur. All manuscripts related to Twitter-based journal clubs were included. Statistical analyses were performed in MS Excel and STATA.


ResultsFrom a total of 469 citations, 11 manuscripts were included and referred to five Twitter-based journal clubs (#ALiEMJC, #BlueJC, #ebnjc, #urojc, #meded). A Twitter-based journal club search yielded 34 potential hashtags/accounts, of which 24 were included in the final analysis. The median duration of activity was 11.75 (interquartile range [IQR] 19.9, SD 10.9) months, with 7 now inactive. The median number of followers and participants was 374 (IQR 574) and 157 (IQR 272), respectively. An overall increasing establishment of active Twitter-based journal clubs was observed, resulting in an exponential increase in total cumulative tweets (R2=.98), and tweets per month (R2=.72). Cumulative tweets for specific journal clubs increased linearly, with @ADC_JC, @EBNursingBMJ, @igsjc, @iurojc, and @NephJC, and showing greatest rate of change, as well as total impressions per month since establishment. An average of two tweets per month was estimated for the majority of participants, while the “Top 10” tweeters for @iurojc showed a significantly lower contribution to overall tweets for each month (P<.005). A linearly increasing impression:tweet ratio was observed for the top five journal clubs.


ConclusionsTwitter-based journal clubs are free, time-efficient, and publicly accessible means to facilitate international discussions regarding clinically important evidence-based research.


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Pharma Guy's curator insight, April 23, 2:15 PM


Perhaps some day docs will get CME credit for participating in Twitter journal clubs!

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Social marketing e social media per promuovere la salute. Università di Urbino ven 24 al MIOS

L’ European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) con “Social marketing guide for public health programme managers and practitioners” fornisce ai re…
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Citizen Science apps and games from Cancer Research UK

Citizen Science apps and games from Cancer Research UK | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

How does it help cancer research?Our scientists have huge amounts of data, and it needs to be analysed by human beings – computers aren’t good enough at recognising the patterns required. By incorporating data analysis into Reverse The Odds, we can get thousands of players to help our scientists learn more about different cancers including head and neck, lung, and bladder cancer.

You’re analysing in the same way researchers do, but because there are a lot more of you, we can get through data much more quickly, freeing up more of our researchers valuable time and unveiling clues about cancer sooner.

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We need to talk about poverty and health

We need to talk about poverty and health | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
I was delighted to read this article in the April 16th edition of the Toronto Star that informs the public about the link between poverty and health and hopefully promotes healthcare literacy about...
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Five Minutes with Carl Cullinane on the Democratic Dashboard: "There's a big difference between open data and accessible data."

Five Minutes with Carl Cullinane on the Democratic Dashboard: "There's a big difference between open data and accessible data." | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Sierra Williams caught up with Carl Cullinane, the project lead behind the Democratic Dashboard, a voter information resource making constituency data open and accessible in the run-up to the UK's ...
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Measuring Patient Outcomes | HealthWorks Collective

Measuring Patient Outcomes | HealthWorks Collective | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Quality measures, low service utilization or the absence of poor performance is not measuring patient outcomes

I apologize for the sports analogy, though it fits so well that I could not resist. Can you imagine if we received statistics like base hits (baseball), first downs (football) and rebounds (basketball), while all final scores remained unknown?  It would be similar to how our healthcare system measures patient outcomes.

The healthcare system measures an abundance of interesting statistics, yet it lacks any final scores. With hospitals, we measure death rates for heart attack patients, timeliness of administering antibiotics and the use of medical imaging. While this is critical information, we have no idea if the patient ever felt better or went back to work.

With physicians, we measure if they followed the recipe to treat asthma, heart failure, diabetes, dementia and other conditions, yet we know virtually nothing as to whether patients get better or their adverse conditions were stabilized.  It’s as if a condition is a separate entity from the patient, though it is how physicians are reimbursed and measured. We don’t have patient outcomes that measure if patients remain limited by their conditions, make progress or recover.

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Era of loneliness? More than 66% of British adults are lonely

Era of loneliness? More than 66% of British adults are lonely | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

More than two thirds of adults in the UK feel lonely as social interaction appears to be on the decline. Younger people who use social media and technology daily experience the most loneliness, a study has found.

A nationwide study conducted by The Big Lunch found that 68 percent of adults in the UK say they feel lonely either often, always or sometimes. This is most acute among 18 to 34 year olds, with 83 percent of this age group experiencing loneliness.

More than a third (38 percent) said they now have less interaction with people they know than they did five years ago, while a quarter (27 percent) only interact socially with others once a week or less.

The research also found that adults in Britain spend only 4 percent of their time – around one hour a day – engaging in social interaction and, in a typical week, interact with only six friends, family members or neighbors, either in face-to-face conversations, a phone call or chatting online.

On average, women spend 15 minutes longer interacting socially each day than men.

Dr Rebecca Harris, a psychologist at the University of Bolton, said: “The findings show that we’re spending less time having social interaction than we used to, we have fewer friends than we’d like and we’re finding it harder to make new friends. This decline in social contact could be contributing to the rise of loneliness in the UK.”


Via britishroses
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