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What types of interventions generate inequalities? Evidence from systematic reviews

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Conclusion Our findings are consistent with the idea that ‘downstream’ preventive interventions are more likely to increase health inequalities than ‘upstream’ interventions. More consistent reporting of differential intervention effectiveness is required to help build the evidence base on IGIs.

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Co-creation in health
E-citizens, e-patients, communities in shaping e-health, health literacy.
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Art Meets Science & Spirituality in a Changing Economy (Ilya Prigogine, John Cage, ...)

Caotico UNIVERSO "In this nastro Affascinante, il compositore / artista John Cage, il fisico termodinamico Ilya Prigogine, e filosofo / comparativo insegnante di religione Huston Smith vengono intervistati. 
Artisti, Scienziati, il leader spirituali ed economisti si Sono riuniti ad Amsterdam nel 1990 per esplorare Vai il paradigma emergente Di Una visione del mondo olistica e le implicazioni per l'economia globale. La Conferenza di cinque giorni e Stato ispirato Dagli artisti Joseph Beuys e Robert Filliou, e manifesta con Louwrien Wijers, Che ha Definito "una scultura mentale".

Via Luis Manuel
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aggiungere la vostra comprensione ...

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Dying cancer victim not given pain relief - Telford hospital apologises following criticism from health watchdog

Dying cancer victim not given pain relief - Telford hospital apologises following criticism from health watchdog | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
A hospital left a dying grandmother without pain relief for two days after being diagnosed with multiple cancer.

Telford’s Princess Royal Hospital was criticised by the health service ombudsman over its treatment of 81-year-old Margaret Humphreys, who died at Telford’s Severn Hospice on December 2013, 16 days after being admitted to the hospital.

The hospital also lost Mrs Humphrey’s admission record when she arrived at the hospital by ambulance.

The ombudsman partially upheld a complaint from Mrs Humphrey’s son Paul, although it rejected claims she had suffered rough handling from hospital staff.

Medical director for the Shrewsbury and Telford Hospitals NHS Trust Dr Edwin Borman apologised to Mr Humphreys and his family, and said lessons would be learned.


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Chin M C's curator insight, August 11, 10:15 PM

 

This sounds terrible. I could imagine the pain and agony the patient went through .

 

I once had a bad tooth ..the dentist said he had to wait for the swelling to subside before extraction could be done.. I had to endure the pain for a night but it was not way compare to the pain this this patient went to ..

 

An Oncology once told me that pain is manageable when pain relief medicine is available..

 

Read more story here 

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0097XI5JO

 

 

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Do we really learn from our mistakes?

Do we really learn from our mistakes? | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

It’s often said that we learn from our mistakes. Indeed, many a business course in leadership offers that premise as a given. I’ve glibly repeated this often in my classes, speeches, and advisory work.

“You don’t learn from your successes,” I point out, “but rather from your errors.”

But do we really learn from our mistakes as a matter of course?

My friend and colleague Michael Wheeler, in his wonderful book The Art of Negotiation, warns us that it is:

- See more at: http://www.athenahealth.com/leadership-forum/really-learn-mistakes?utm_content=bufferc6e72&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer#sthash.LdRywaKu.dpuf

We teach doctors about these cognitive weaknesses — anchoring, confirmation bias, and patterning — but we tell them that they are unlikely to recognize that they are happening. Instead, we need them to buy into systems of group behavior that protect them from themselves. - See more at: http://www.athenahealth.com/leadership-forum/really-learn-mistakes?utm_content=bufferc6e72&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer#sthash.LdRywaKu.dpuf

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Deleuze : Cours sur Foucault - Formations historiques et Folie - 1/8 - YouTube

********** TRANSCRIPTION Partie 1 : http://www2.univ-paris8.fr/deleuze/article.php3?id_article=403 Partie 2 : http://www2.univ-paris8.fr/deleuze/article.php3...

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The Creative Apocalypse That Wasn’t

The Creative Apocalypse That Wasn’t | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
In the digital economy, it was supposed to be impossible to make money by making art. Instead, creative careers are thriving — but in complicated and unexpected ways. On July 11, 2000, in one of the more unlikely moments in the history of the Senate Judiciary Committee, Senator Orrin Hatch handed the microphone to Metallica’s drummer, Lars Ulrich, to hear his thoughts on art in the age of digital reproduction. Ulrich’s primary concern was a new online service called Napster, which had debuted a little more than a year before. As Ulrich explained in his statement, the band began investigating Napster after unreleased versions of one of their songs began playing on radio stations around the country. They discovered that their entire catalog of music was available there for free.
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Future iPhones Will Have One Week Of Battery Life, With One Catch

Future iPhones Will Have One Week Of Battery Life, With One Catch | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

British tech company, Intelligent Energy, is working with Apple AAPL +3.74% to produce an iPhone battery that could last for a week on a single charge, according to the Telegraph.

This new report states that Apple and Intelligent Energy are working closely together, with  Apple perhaps considering bringing this new technology to a future iPhone.

The tech works by producing electricity in a hydrogen fuel cell by combining hydrogen and oxygen, which creates a small amount of vapour that escapes via a built-in vent. Intelligent Energy has a patent on this technology and already has a popular portable charging device that uses this tech called ‘Upp’, which it released last year.

I’m familiar with Intelligent Energy’s work and I reviewed Upp last year, but I hadn’t considered the possibility of it being made into a smartphone battery. Although a great concept; there are obvious flaws, which make it difficult to see its potential as a replacement for lithium-ion batteries used in modern smartphones.

The biggest issue is around the water vapour that’s produced from the chemical process, creating electricity. Upp uses fans to blow air across the fuel cell and, as such, needs to remain in a ventilated area to work.


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Understanding Breast Changes: A Health Guide for Women

Understanding Breast Changes: A Health Guide for Women | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Information on specific breast conditions and changes, including how these changes are detected, diagnosed and treated. Explains that while most breast changes are not cancer, all breast changes need to be checked by a doctor. Helps women understand the next steps after an abnormal mammogram result, and includes a list of questions to help women talk with their doctor about these issues.
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Palliative Care and Social Media - YouTube

Cory Ingram, MD MS FAAHPM discusses the importance social media plays in spreading awareness of palliative care.
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Social Determinants of Risk and Outcomes for Cardiovascular Disease

 #healthpromotionAn Institute of Medicine report titled U.S. Health in International Perspective: Shorter Lives, Poorer Health documents the decline in the health status of Americans relative to people in other high-income countries, concluding that “Americans are dying and suffering from illness and injury at rates that are demonstrably unnecessary.”1 The report blames many factors, “adverse economic and social conditions” among them. In an editorial in Science discussing the findings of the Institute of Medicine report, Bayer et al2 call for a national commission on health “to address the social causes that have put the USA last among comparable nations.” Although mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the United States has been on a linear decline since the 1970s, the burden remains high. It accounted for 31.9% of deaths in 2010.3 There is general agreement that the decline is the result, in equal measure, of advances in prevention and advances in treatment. These advances in turn rest on dramatic successes in efforts to understand the biology of CVD that began in the late 1940s.4,5 It has been assumed that the steady downward trend in mortality will continue into the future as further breakthroughs in biological science lead to further advances in prevention and treatment. This view of the future may not be warranted. The prevalence of CVD in the United States is expected to rise 10% between 2010 and 2030.6 This change in the trajectory of cardiovascular burden is the result not only of an aging population but also of a dramatic rise over the past 25 years in obesity and the hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and physical inactivity that accompany weight gain. Although there is no consensus on the precise causes of the obesity epidemic, a dramatic change in the underlying biology of Americans is not postulated. More likely culprits are changes in societal and environmental conditions that have led to changes in diet and physical activity. At the same time, there is increasing awareness that the benefits of advances in prevention and treatment have not been shared equally across economic, racial, and ethnic groups in the United States. Overall population health cannot improve if parts of the population do not benefit from improvements in prevention and treatment.

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Book Review: What Use is Sociology? Conversations with Zygmunt Bauman, Michael-Hviid Jacobsen and Keith Tester

Book Review: What Use is Sociology? Conversations with Zygmunt Bauman, Michael-Hviid Jacobsen and Keith Tester | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

This conversational book with Zygmunt Bauman looks at the usefulness of sociology with an aim to inspire future conversations about the discipline. Olivia Mena found this book to be a sounding board of the timeless but central questions which social theorists and practitioners must revisit regularly in the everyday practice of the ‘scientific sorcery’ that is sociology.

This review originally appeared on LSE Review of Books.

What Use is Sociology? Zygmunt Bauman, Michael-Hviid Jacobsen and Keith Tester. Polity Press. March 2014.

Find this book: 

Sociology is a part of the social world that it seeks to explore and explain. It is constantly evolving inside its duty to provide orientation in a changing world, and as such, it is usually in a perpetual state of crisis, as it must defend and legitimate its ongoing existence at every turn. It is a quality of thinking that can be used for different ends, but when used at its best, like Zygmunt Bauman does, it is when it is taken up as a tool to where people can make sense of their lives and the world around them and aspire to better possibilities and futurities (p. 6).

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See where women outnumber men around the world (and why)

See where women outnumber men around the world (and why) | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Overall, there are slightly more men than women in the world. According to 2015 estimates by the United Nations, there are 101.8 men for every 100 women, with the number of men rising gradually each year since 1960.

But a map by the Pew Research Center with the latest U.N. data clearly shows that men and women are distributed unequally around the globe. In former Soviet republics, for example, women outnumber men. Conversely, there are more men than women in Asia, Arab countries and Northern Africa.

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Responsibility and accountability for well informed health-care decisions: a global challenge - The Lancet

Responsibility and accountability for well informed health-care decisions: a global challenge - The Lancet | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
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WHO | Global Reference List of 100 Core Health Indicators, 2015

WHO | Global Reference List of 100 Core Health Indicators, 2015 | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

The Global Reference List of 100 Core Health Indicators is a standard set of 100 indicators prioritized by the global community to provide concise information on the health situation and trends, including responses at national and global levels. It will be reviewed and updated periodically as global and country priorities evolve and measurement methods improve. This publication contains the 2015 version

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Can America cope with a resurgence of tropical disease?

Can America cope with a resurgence of tropical disease? | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Having stamped out a number of tropical diseases – including malaria – decades ago, is America today complacent about a rising wave of infectious disease? By Carrie Arnold. One rainy Friday morning in March 2015, Dr Laila Woc-Colburn saw two patients with neurocysticercosis (a parasitic infection of the brain) and one with Chagas disease, which is transmitted by insects nicknamed ‘kissing bugs’. Having attended medical school in her native Guatemala, she was used to treating these kinds of diseases. But she was not in Guatemala any more – this was Houston, Texas.

For half a day each week, one wing of the Smith Clinic’s third floor in Houston is transformed into a tropical medicine clinic, treating all manner of infectious diseases for anyone who walks through the door. Since it opened in 2011, Woc-Colburn and her colleagues have treated everything from dengue and chikungunya to river blindness and cutaneous leishmaniasis. Their patients are not globetrotting travellers, bringing exotic diseases back home. The Smith Clinic is a safety net provider, the last resort for healthcare for people on low incomes and without insurance. Many of their patients haven’t left the Houston area for years.

EXTRAComing to America: the story of chikungunya

Carrie Arnold charts one virus’s journey to American shores.


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Perché gli eReader faranno la fine degli iPod: i libri li leggeremo sul telefono

Perché gli eReader faranno la fine degli iPod: i libri li leggeremo sul telefono | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Sempre più persone lo fanno: è un mezzo semplice, comodo e sempre a portata di mano. E così si fa inarrestabile il declino di una tecnologia già superata


Una fila di sedili della metro, tutti occupati da persone con la testa china e gli occhi fissi sullo schermo del telefono. È una scena quotidiana, che tutti abbiamo visto andando al lavoro, e che si ripete nelle sale d’attesa, in treno, in coda. È un’immagine che associamo all’incapacità di comunicare, all’alienazione prodotta dalle nuove tecnologie, ma potrebbe anche essere il sintomo di un ritorno adattività più nobili della scalata ai livelli di Candy Crush e simili: il ritorno della lettura. Secondo alcuni studi, infatti, è in aumento il numero di persone che usano lo smartphone per godersi un buon libro.  

 

Gli eReader faranno la fine degli iPod  

Leggere un romanzo sul telefono si può fare. La premessa, però, è che non si può pensare di soppiantare la carta con uno schermo per infinite ragioni (la vista che si stanca, le batterie che non durano abbastanza, la passione per l’oggetto-libro che rimane un punto fermo per i lettori forti, ecc.). Ma il punto è un altro: i dati sulle vendite degli eReader ci dicono che i vari Kindle, Kobo e compagnia non sono destinati a durare. Hanno segnato una svolta, come hanno fatto i lettori mp3 e gli iPod per la musica, ma come questi sono già diventati una tecnologia di passaggio. A vincere, ancora una volta, sono gli smartphone. 

 

Più piccoli, sempre con noi e, soprattutto, inclusivi: potendo leggere un libro con lo stesso oggetto che mi permette di scrivere email, chattare e rispondere alle chiamate, che senso ha portarsi dietro un dispositivo in più? Immaginiamo di essere in aereo: il tablet o l’eReader sono da qualche parte nel trolley, il telefono in tasca: cosa useremo per leggere durante il volo? 

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More Young Americans Now Die From Guns Than Cars

The United States is one of the greatest nations in the world. But compared to our peers, we’re one of the worst when it comes to gun violence.

In America, you can be shot at an elementary school. You can be murdered at a church or movie theatre.

You can even be executed on live TV — and yet there’s no real expectation of gun reform.

Gun-related violence and death is a real public health problem in America, researchers say. And these three charts illustrate why.

1. Gun-related deaths in America wildly outpace our peer nations

More than 32,000 people per year are killed by guns in the United States — at least.

The total number’s incomplete because some gun-related deaths are left out of CDC statistics, Adrienne LaFrance wrote atThe Atlantic earlier this year. That’s partly because of privacy concerns, the mystery over some police-related shooting data … and the political consequences of taking on the gun lobby, LaFrance points out.

Notably, the CDC has avoided some research into gun-related injury, and the Washington Post suggests that “fear and funding shortfalls” are to blame.

(Researchers have repeatedly called on the CDC to better study firearm-related injuries and deaths, Todd Frankel writes at the Post, given concerns within the scientific community “that gun violence as a public health problem was being ignored.”)


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Who wants to live forever?

Who wants to live forever? | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

OVER the past 100 years, mankind has made great leaps in eliminating diseases and learning how to keep people alive. The life expectancy of a person born in America in 1900 was just 47 years. Eighty years later that figure had increased to 70 years for men and 77 years for women. But since then progress has slowed: a boy born in America in 2013 is expected to live just six years longer than his 1990 cohort. And not all of his twilight years will be golden.

Statisticians at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington have calculated new figures that adjust life expectancy at birth for the number of healthy years that a person can be expected to enjoy, free from disease and disability. An American male born in 1990 is expected to live until 72, but can expect nine years of ill health. By 2013, life expectancy increased to 76 years, but with ten and a half years living in ill health. Since 1990, American men have gained an additional three years of healthy life and an additional four and half years of ill health. Such has been the slow rate of longevity progress in America, that Chinese and Iranian men born today are expected to live longer and healthier lives than their American counterparts.

America spends a great of money keeping people alive for longer: around one quarter of America’s spending on Medicare, or healthcare for the elderly, is spent during the last six months of life alone. Perhaps knowing when to give up the ghost is the key to real happiness and national wealth.


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Patient power will fix our ills (Wired UK)

Patient power will fix our ills (Wired UK) | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

This article was first published in the September 2015 issue of WIRED magazine. Be the first to read WIRED's articles in print before they're posted online, and get your hands on loads of additional content by subscribing online

In the past, the doctor-patient relationship was a one-way street. A patient visited a physician for a diagnosis, the physician told the patient his or her assessment, and the patient went home (hopefully) to comply with the physician's recommendations.

Healthcare will improve only when patients are seen by the healthcare system, and physicians in particular, as partners and decision makers. Imagine this. A teenager gets sick, allows her doctors to dictate her care… and it leads to a misdiagnosis, 43 hospitalisations, six major surgeries and three organs removed. That was me. At 26, I fired all my doctors, and not only did the decision likely save my life, it gave me back my life. I took control of my healthcare, worked with doctors who treated me only like a peer, got diagnosed correctly (Crohn's disease) and, with the correct meds, was in remission in 24 hours.

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Cell density remains constant as brain shrinks with age

Cell density remains constant as brain shrinks with age | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

New, ultra-high-field magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the brain by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago provide the most detailed images to date to show that while the brain shrinks with age, brain cell density remains constant.

The study, of cognitively normal young and old adults, was published in the journal NMR in Biomedicine.

The images provide the first evidence that in normal aging, cell density is preserved throughout the brain, not just in specific regions, as previous studies on human brain tissue have shown. The findings also suggest that the maintenance of brain cell density may protect against cognitive impairment as the brain gradually shrinks in normal aging.

The images were made at UIC by a powerful 9.4-Tesla MRI, the first of its kind for human imaging. The 9.4 T magnetic field is more than three times stronger than that of a typical MRI machine in a doctor’s office and is currently approved only for research. The strongest MRI units approved for clinical use are 3 T.


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Gender equality and health - YouTube

Two studies of the European project SOPHIE detect a poorer health in women in comparison with men in European countries with family policies less oriented to...
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The Rich Discover Inequality

The Rich Discover Inequality | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

After forty years of rising income and wealth inequality, some of America’s rich seem worried that maybe things have gone too far. In a recent New York Times op-ed, for example, Peter Georgescu, CEO emeritus of the multinational public relations firm, Young and Rubicon, wrote that he is “scared” of a backlash that might lead to social unrest or “oppressive taxes.”

The Times was so impressed with such enlightened views from this prominent capitalist that a few days later they devoted another long article with his answers to questions submitted by readers.

We should, I suppose, be grateful that Georgescu seems to understand that the gap between the rising value of what American workers produce and the stagnation of their wages has channeled the benefits of economic growth to shareholders (and, he might have added, but didn’t, corporate CEOs). But if you are waiting for him and other members of his class to get serious about the problem, don’t hold your breath.

Georgescu writes that he would like to see corporations pay their workers a fair wage. But with few exceptions, they don’t. He doesn’t tell us why, but the reason is obvious—paying workers less has made their owners and top executives rich.

So, what to do?


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Statisticians using social media to track foodborne illness and improve disaster response

The growing popularity and use of social media around the world is presenting new opportunities for statisticians to glean insightful information from the infinite stream of posts, tweets and other online communications that will help improve public safety.

Two such examples--one that enhances systems to track foodborne illness outbreaks and another designed to improve disaster-response activities--were presented this week at the 2015 Joint Statistical Meetings (JSM 2015) in Seattle.

Tracking Foodborne Illness Outbreaks:

In a presentation titled "Digital Surveillance of Foodborne Illnesses and Outbreaks" presented yesterday, biostatistician Elaine Nsoesie unveiled a method for tracking foodborne illness and disease outbreaks using social media sites such as Twitter and business review sites such as Yelp to supplement traditional surveillance systems. Nsoesie is a research fellow in pediatrics at Boston Children's Hospital.

The study's purpose was to assess whether crowdsourcing via online reviews of restaurants and other foodservice institutions can be used as a surveillance tool to augment the efforts of local public health departments. These traditional surveillance systems capture only a fraction of the estimated 48 million foodborne illness cases in the country each year, primarily because few affected individuals seek medical care or report their condition to the appropriate authorities.

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'Our Blessed Homeland' - Tom Gauld

'Our Blessed Homeland' -  Tom Gauld | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
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GMOs, Herbicides, and Public Health — NEJM

GMOs, Herbicides, and Public Health — NEJM | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are not high on most physicians' worry lists. If we think at all about biotechnology, most of us probably focus on direct threats to human health, such as prospects for converting pathogens to biologic weapons or the implications of new technologies for editing the human germline. But while those debates simmer, the application of biotechnology to agriculture has been rapid and aggressive. The vast majority of the corn and soybeans grown in the United States are now genetically engineered. Foods produced from GM crops have become ubiquitous. And unlike regulatory bodies in 64 other countries, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not require labeling of GM foods.

Two recent developments are dramatically changing the GMO landscape. First, there have been sharp increases in the amounts and numbers of chemical herbicides applied to GM crops, and still further increases — the largest in a generation — are scheduled to occur in the next few years. Second, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has classified glyphosate, the herbicide most widely used on GM crops, as a “probable human carcinogen”1 and classified a second herbicide, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), as a “possible human carcinogen.”2


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