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Michael Marmot: leader in the social determinants of health : The Lancet

Concern about the link between poverty and ill-health might seem to sit firmly at one end of the political spectrum, but findings from the Whitehall II study, which he leads, show something more complex: that even among people who are not poor, the higher you are up the hierarchy, the better your chances of good health and a long life. There are issues here for any leader to ponder. The Commission's recent report criticised a “toxic combination of bad policies, economics and politics” for the global health inequalities it found.
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Co-creation in health
E-citizens, e-patients, communities in shaping e-health, health literacy.
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Il caso Ebola. I media e la percezione dei rischi - AIRESPSA - School - 2014

Dalla percezione alla gestione dei rischi
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Le paracétamol, une molécule pas si anodine que cela

Le paracétamol, une molécule pas si anodine que cela | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Directeur de recherche à l'Inserm, Bernard Jégou explique que le paracétamol peut, dans certaines conditions, avoir un effet sur la fertilité des humains.

Via EVELYNE PIERRON
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A New Index Measures Impact Pharma Has on Infectious Diseases

A New Index Measures Impact Pharma Has on Infectious Diseases | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

The pharmaceutical industry regularly boasts that its efforts to develop treatments for infectious diseases in poor nations are making a difference. But for those wondering how to gauge those efforts, a new metric has been created.

The Global Health Impact Index measures three factors: the need for several important drugs for three specific infectious diseases: tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS and malaria; the effectiveness of the available treatments; and the number of people who can access those drugs. The rankings estimate the amount of death and disability the drugs are alleviating.

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How Americans' refusal to talk about death hurts the elderly

In my family, we don't really talk about death. But, every now and then, we joke about it.

For some reason, there is a running joke among my immediate family about how my parents will die. Specifically, my brother and I will come home for Thanksgiving one year and find them decomposing on the couch.

Yes, this is a bizarre thing to crack jokes about. But it's also, in its own, ghoulish way, a bit of a fantasy — an affront to the way that Americans tend to die in the 21st century, with ticking machines and tubes and round-the-clock care. In this joke, my parents' death is a simple, quiet, and uncomplicated death at home.

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Training public health superheroes: five talents for public health leadership

Training public health superheroes: five talents for public health leadership | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Conclusions Talent-based approaches have been effective for leadership development in other sectors. These talents are the first specific to the practice of public health and align with some aspects of existing frameworks. An increased focus on identifying and developing talents during public health training, as opposed to ‘competency’-based approaches, may be effective in strengthening public health leadership. Further research to understand the combination and intensity of talents across a larger sample of public health leaders is required.

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Infographic: pharma and the customer experience

Infographic: pharma and the customer experience | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
This infographic asks ask one question. Should customer experience be a priority for pharma in 2015?

Via COUCH. , Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek, Rémy TESTON
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Homo erectus, anche al lavoro?

Homo erectus, anche al lavoro? | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Le scrivanie che obbligano a stare in piedi non sono scomode e promettono più salute. Un po’ fanno tendenza, un po’ cominciano a diffondersi come strumenti per combattere la sedentarietà.
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Non-clinical interventions for reducing unnecessary caesarean section - The Cochrane Library - Khunpradit

Background

Caesarean section rates are steadily increasing globally. The factors contributing to these observed increases are complex. Non-clinical interventions, those applied independent of patient care in a clinical encounter, may have a role in reducing unnecessary caesarean sections.

Objectives

To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of non-clinical interventions for reducing unnecessary caesarean sections.

Search methods

We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Specialised Register (29 March 2010), the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group Specialised Register (29 March 2010), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 2); MEDLINE (1950 to March 2010); EMBASE (1947 to March 2010) and CINAHL (1982 to March 2010).

Selection criteria

We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-experimental studies, controlled clinical trials (CCTs), controlled before and after studies (CBAs) with at least two intervention and control sites, and interrupted time series analyses (ITS) where the intervention time was clearly defined and there were at least three data points before and three after the intervention. Studies evaluated non-clinical interventions to reduce unnecessary caesarean section rates. Participants included pregnant women and their families, healthcare providers who work with expectant mothers, communities and advocacy groups.

Data collection and analysis

Three review authors independently assessed the quality and abstracted data of all eligible studies using a standardised data extraction form, modified from the Cochrane EPOC checklists. We contacted study authors for additional information.

Main results

We included 16 studies in this review.

Six studies specifically targeted pregnant women. Two RCTs were shown to be effective in reducing caesarean section rates: a nurse-led relaxation training programme for women with a fear or anxiety of childbirth and birth preparation sessions. However, both RCTs were small in size and targeted younger mothers with their first pregnancies. There is insufficient evidence that prenatal education and support programmes, computer patient decision-aids, decision-aid booklets and intensive group therapy are effective.

Ten studies targeted health professionals. Three of these studies were effective in reducing caesarean section rates. A cluster-RCT of guideline implementation with mandatory second opinion resulted in a small, statistically significant reduction in total caesarean section rates (adjusted risk difference (RD) -1.9; 95% confidence interval (CI) -3.8 to -0.1); this reduction was predominately in intrapartum sections. An ITS study of mandatory second opinion and peer review feedback at department meetings found statistically significant results at 48 months for reducing repeat caesarean section rates (change in level was -6.4%; 95% CI -9.7% to -3.1% and change in slope -1.14%; 95% CI -1.9% to -0.3%) but not for total caesarean section rates. A cluster-RCT of guideline implementation with support from local opinion leaders increased the proportion of women with a previous caesarean section being offered a trial of labour (absolute difference 16.8%) and the number who had a vaginal birth (VBAC rates) (absolute difference 13.5%). The P values are, however, not reported due to unit of analysis errors. There was insufficient evidence that audit and feedback, training of public health nurses, insurance reform, external peer review and legislative changes are effective.

Authors' conclusions

Implementation of guidelines with mandatory second opinion can lead to a small reduction in caesarean section rates, predominately in intrapartum sections. Peer review, including pre-caesarean consultation, mandatory secondary opinion and postcaesarean surveillance can lead to a reduction in repeat caesarean section rates. Guidelines disseminated with endorsement and support from local opinion leaders may increase the proportion of women with previous caesarean sections being offered a trial of labour in certain settings. Nurse-led relaxation classes and birth preparation classes may reduce caesarean section rates in low-risk pregnancies.

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Six questions to ask when searching for online health information

Six questions to ask when searching for online health information | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Nearly 60% of U.S. adults look for health information online, according to the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project in Washington. And one-quarter of U.S. adults have read someone else’s writing about their medical issues in a blog or on a website.

 

More than 95 million Americans visited websites related to health, fitness and nutrition in June, according to Nielsen. That’s more than two out of five people who were active online that month. WebMD Health Network led the way with 24.6 million unique U.S. users, followed by Everyday Health, Yahoo! Health sites, Livestrong.com and About.com Health, Nielsen found.

 

Here are six questions to ask yourself when searching for online health information:

 

1. Are you going to multiple sites and not just stopping at one commercial site, such as the drug manufacturer’s website, for your information?

 

2. Do you winnow your printed material down to a manageable load before you present it to your doctor?

 

3. Are you working with a doctor or clinical team that’s open to discussing what you find online?

 

4. Have you browsed the websites of national nonprofit organizations dedicated to your condition?

 

5. Have you overlooked patients’ experience close to home in favor of online groups?

 

6. Are you using the buddy system?


Via Andrew Spong, Marie Ennis-O'Connor
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Steve S Ryan, PhD's curator insight, April 17, 2013 2:24 AM

When surfing the net always ask yourself "Who is paying for this website, and what is their agenda?"

Look for heathcare sites that are HON-certified (look for the HON logo). "Health on the Net" has 8 patient-protection principles that a site must adhere to before they are certified. (Read about HON on Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Health_On_the_Net_Foundation)  

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10 health IT trends for 2015 - App pharmacies

10 health IT trends for 2015 - App pharmacies | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
I’ve identified ten 2015 trends I foresee rising out of these new financial and clinical pressures.
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Quand l'impression 3D aide Barilla à réinventer la pasta

Quand l'impression 3D aide Barilla à réinventer la pasta | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

“Technos et Innovations : Demain, sera-t-il possible de personnaliser la forme de ses pâtes, chez soi ou au restaurant, via une imprimante 3D ? Le géant...”


Via Paul-Jean Ricolfi, Pierre-André Marechal, Catherine Pascal
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Can Wikipedia Ever Be a Definitive Medical Text. How to create a credible, accessible, crowd-sourced resource for health information

Can Wikipedia Ever Be a Definitive Medical Text. How to create a credible, accessible, crowd-sourced resource for health information | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Every time I panic unreasonably over some minor bodily abnormality—which is often—I take to the Internet. I’m far from the only one—72 percent of Internet users have looked online for health information in the past year, according to Pew Research. And though as a responsible health editor, I should of course say that if you really think something’s wrong, you should go to the doctor, I know that even if you do go to the doctor, chances are you’ll Google whatever she tells you anyway.

Wikipedia being the sixth-largest site on the whole wide Internet, these people searching for medical information online are often going to end up there. Whether or not they should be doing it, they are. I am. Patients are, and so are doctors. Which is why efforts to improve the quality of Wikipedia’s medical information are important—if you can’t lead people away from the fountain of crowd-sourced knowledge, you can at least try to unmuddy the waters.

new study published in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Associationsays the waters are still pretty muddy. The researchers looked at the Wikipedia pages for the 10 most costly medical conditions (in terms of public and private expenditures) and compared them with peer-reviewed sources, finding them wanting.


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Why is everyone so busy Time poverty is a problem partly of perception and partly of distribution - TheEconomist

Why is everyone so busy  Time poverty is a problem partly of perception and partly of distribution - TheEconomist | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
THE predictions sounded like promises: in the future, working hours would be short and vacations long. “Our grandchildren”, reckoned John Maynard Keynes in 1930, would work around “three hours a day”—and probably only by choice. Economic progress and technological advances had already shrunk working hours considerably by his day, and there was no reason to believe this trend would not continue. Whizzy cars and ever more time-saving tools and appliances guaranteed more speed and less drudgery in all parts of life. Social psychologists began to fret: whatever would people do with all their free time?
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Patient Opinion Leaders Are the New Healthcare Influencers

Patient Opinion Leaders Are the New Healthcare Influencers | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
The pharmaceutical industry has historically invested enormous amounts of money into identifying and engaging with those medical influencers who can potentially make or break its new therapies. These ‘super influencer’ doctors, known as Key Opinion Leaders are the ones other prescribers look to for guidance.
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The 6 questions every good doctor should ask you

The list of questions is short, but actually answering them probably isn't. These are questions that get at some very fundamental decisions about what makes life worth living — and at what point a patient might decide to stop fighting a disease.

But as Volandes, who also founded a group dedicated to advanced end-of-life planning, argues, they are absolutely necessary questions to answer — even when you're perfectly healthy.

"The best time is when the patient is feeling great, when they have their wits about them, and not critically ill," Volandes recently told HealthLeaders. "This is not a one-time conversation. Doctors should be having these routinely. At a minimum, with anyone over 65, with a critical illness. [Otherwise] it's depriving them of having their wishes honored. We are so compartmentalized that we think we have to pass it off to the oncologist or cardiologist. No, this is a fundamental part of your job."

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Antibiotics "a terrible business model" for Pharmas expert tells Davos

Antibiotics "a terrible business model" for Pharmas expert tells Davos | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Drug industry execs
at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland were told they are no longer best placed to develop antibiotics by a panel who said Governments should lead efforts to create these vital new drugs.
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School-based prevention for illicit drug use - Cochrane

School-based prevention for illicit drug use - Cochrane | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Programmes based on social competence were mostly represented and showed a similar tendency to reduce the use of substances and the intention to use, and to improve knowledge about drugs, compared to usual curricula, but the effects were seldom statistically significant. Programmes based on social influence showed weak effects that were rarely significant. Programmes based on a combination of social competence and social influence approaches seemed to have better results than the other categories, with effective results in preventing marijuana use at longer follow-up, and in preventing any drug use. Knowledge-based interventions showed no differences in outcomes, apart from knowledge, which was improved among participants involved in the programme. - See more at: http://summaries.cochrane.org/CD003020/ADDICTN_school-based-prevention-for-illicit-drug-use#sthash.BSZH1TU8.dpuf

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A healthcare case study of ASCO, Novartis and Boehringer conversation…

Conversation archetypes A healthcare case study of ASCO, Novartis and Boehringer

Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor
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The 4 biggest reasons why inequality is bad for society

The 4 biggest reasons why inequality is bad for society | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
It's safe to say that economic inequality bothers us. But why? Harvard philosopher T. M. Scanlon offers four reasons we should tackle — and fix — the problem.

Via jean lievens
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Richard Smith: Would you like to die at 75 or 150?

Richard Smith: Would you like to die at 75 or 150? | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
“Sex and death are the only things that can interest a serious mind,” said W B Yeats, so, although more of a flippant than a serious mind, I return to death after my last pondering on the subject that spread literally across the globe. I’m asking whether it would be better to live to 75 or to 150, and if you know me at all you will know my answer.
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What is the appropriate dosage of radiotherapy for early breast cancer? - Medivizor

What is the appropriate dosage of radiotherapy for early breast cancer? - Medivizor | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Share In a nutshell This paper studied the dosage of radiotherapy in women who have had surgery for early breast cancer.  Some background After surgical removal of tumour, radiation is often given to prevent relapse (return of cancer). Radiation therapy can be fractionated (dividing the total radiation into smaller doses over time). Fractionation is less …
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Noam Chomsky: 'The Foundations of Liberty Are Ripped to Shreds'

Noam Chomsky: 'The Foundations of Liberty Are Ripped to Shreds' | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
The U.S. openly brags about boom times for its drone wars, while casually abandoning our 800 year-old system of due process.

Via jean lievens
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15 things that you really should know about presentations


Via Baiba Svenca, Javier Sánchez Bolado, Sémio PUB, Catherine Pascal
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Baiba Svenca's curator insight, December 6, 2014 5:32 AM

The content of this slide presentation is actually an infographic with data about 15 most important things you need to know when you are getting your presentation ready.


Willem Kuypers's curator insight, December 7, 2014 2:02 AM

Quelques faits très intéressants sur les présentations. 

Jose Pietri's curator insight, December 8, 2014 3:59 AM

Review all modules with these assertions in mind.

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ANTIBIORÉSISTANCE: Pouvoir prédire les contre-attaques des superbactéries

ANTIBIORÉSISTANCE: Pouvoir prédire les contre-attaques des superbactéries | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Un logiciel open-source et disponible gratuitement capable de prédire la réponse du Staphylococcus Aureus Résistant à la Méthicilline (SARM) à un nouvel antibiotique, avant même que le médicament soit testé sur des patients, c’est la réponse de...

Via L'Info Autrement
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The on-demand economy. Workers on tap. The rise of the on-demand economy poses difficult questions for workers, companies and politicians @TheEconomist

The on-demand economy. Workers on tap. The rise of the on-demand economy poses difficult questions for workers, companies and politicians @TheEconomist | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
IN THE early 20th century Henry Ford combined moving assembly lines with mass labour to make building cars much cheaper and quicker—thus turning the automobile from a rich man’s toy into transport for the masses. Today a growing group of entrepreneurs is striving to do the same to services, bringing together computer power with freelance workers to supply luxuries that were once reserved for the wealthy. Uber provides chauffeurs. Handy supplies cleaners. SpoonRocket delivers restaurant meals to your door. Instacart keeps your fridge stocked. In San Francisco a young computer programmer can already live like a princess.
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A wave of new medicines known as biologics will be good for drugmakers, but may not be so good for health budgets - © The Economist

A wave of new medicines known as biologics will be good for drugmakers, but may not be so good for health budgets - © The Economist | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
IN PHARMACEUTICALS, the 20th century was the era of the small molecule. The industry thrived by identifying a steady stream of relatively simple compounds that treated lots of people, patenting them and making a fortune. In the early 21st century it has become harder for drugmakers to find new cures quickly enough to replace those on which the patents are expiring.
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