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Health literacy basics: who is the audience, and what is the purpose?

Health literacy basics: who is the audience, and what is the purpose? | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

In his book The Checklist Manifesto, Dr. Atul Gawande argues that people, even experts, often skip basic, critical steps that can determine success or failure in a project or task. He proposes that people use checklists to increase the accuracy and consistency of their performance. Checklists draw our attention to all the elements in a process, not just a selective few that we remember or feel most comfortable doing.


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Co-creation in health
E-citizens, e-patients, communities in shaping e-health, health literacy.
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Il caso Ebola. I media e la percezione dei rischi - AIRESPSA - School - 2014

Dalla percezione alla gestione dei rischi
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TV e Twitter: la convergenza dei media

TV e Twitter: la convergenza dei media | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Il tempo della separazione dei media è ormai terminato. Oggi si assiste ad una crescente integrazione tra media, non solo tra offline e online, ma anche tra strumenti diversi all'interno di ciascuna di queste due macrocategorie. La relazione tra TV e Twitter è forse l'esempio più evidente di questa convergenza. Sempre più spesso il telespettatore guarda la TV, twittando continuamente commenti su quanto visto. Un'infografica di Ipsos, relativa alla ricerca Mediact TV Influencers, mostra il potere di influenza degli utenti di Twitter: più fruizione delle forme televisive tradizionali e innovative, più propensione alla condivisione.

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Obesity Classified as a Disease; What Marketers Need to Know | Kantar Media Healthcare Research

Obesity Classified as a Disease; What Marketers Need to Know | Kantar Media Healthcare Research | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

With the AMA obesity news dominating headlines in June, we wanted to share some data points on the obese from Kantar Media’s 2013 MARS OTC/DTC Study. About 2 of every 3 adults have weight issues with 64% having BMI’s of 25+ (overweight or obese), according to the study. Further, about 26% of all U.S. adults are considered obese (BMI 30+).

Here are 10 additional data points about obese adults as they now represent an even more important group of prospects for healthcare and pharma marketers.

- See more at: http://www.kantarmedia-healthcare.com/obesity-classifed-as-a-disease-what-marketers-need-to-know#sthash.SrUOHLP6.dpuf

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Questioning Medicine: The Vitamin D Craze

Questioning Medicine: The Vitamin D Craze | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Maybe the focus should be on loss prevention, not supplementation.
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Normative Impulsivity: Adorno on Ethics and the Body

Normative Impulsivity: Adorno on Ethics and the Body | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Adorno’s commitment to anti-foundationalism generates a concern over how his ethically normative appraisals of social phenomena can be founded. Drawing on both Kohlmann and Bernstein’s account, I produce a new reading which contends somatic impulses are capable of bearing intrinsically normative epistemic and moral content. This entails a new way of understanding Adorno’s contention that Auschwitz produced a new categorical imperative. Working with Bernstein’s account, I claim that Auschwitz makes manifest the hostility of the instrumentalization of reason to the somatic grounds of reason. One’s mimetic identification with the victims of Auschwitz arouses a self-preserving desire to intercede in and re-orient the progress of reason itself, for the sake of one’s own somatic integrity. In closing, I claim – contra Zuidervaart – that this reading allows us to place the ethical as primary in Adorno, without reducing the political to it.
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Physicians must be the architects of health care change

Physicians must be the architects of health care change | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
If America is ever to boast of delivering the best health care in the world, the system will require transformational change.
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Healthcare in the Cloud | Rickscloud

Healthcare in the Cloud | Rickscloud | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Cloud-based services are becoming more widely adopted by healthcare organizations. The past year has seen a surge of interest regarding the potential of cloud
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Engaging patient through social medi Is healthcare ready for empowere and digitally demanding patients?

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Look for the gold standard: double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized tests

Look for the gold standard: double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized tests

The most reliable type of study — especially for clinical trials — is the randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study.

If you are looking at a clinical trial, a psychology study, or an animal study, and it hasn't been designed like this — and there isn't a good reason that it couldn't have been — then you might want to question the results.

Let's break down this terminology:

1) Randomized: This means that the participants in the study were randomly placed into the experimental group and the comparison group. This is important because if people get to choose, they might be more likely to pick one or the other because of some unexpected factor.

As a hypothetical example, maybe people who are more optimistic are more likely to want to try a new drug for anxiety rather than an old drug that's being used for comparison. And maybe optimism is linked to better outcomes for generalized anxiety disorder. The researchers could end up thinking that these people got better because of the drug when it was actually because they were innately going to do better anyway.

Similar problems can be introduced if researchers choose who goes into which category. That's why random is best.

2) Placebo-controlled: A controlled study has an appropriate comparison group, also called a control group. In medical studies, one comparison group usually gets a placebo — a fake intervention such as a sugar pill. This is in order to distinguish what the drug actually did from what a participant's psychological expectations did. (Placebo effects can be surprisingly strong — so strong that they can oftentimes relieve pain, among other health problems. And they've been getting stronger in recent decades, according to Steve Silberman's in-depth placebo story from Wired.)

A good placebo group should be as similar to the experimental group as possible. So, for example, if you were testing out a drug that's a large, red pill, you'd ideally want to give your comparison placebo group a large, red pill that's the same in every way, but doesn't contain the drug. (Yes, even a pill's color and size can have a placebo effect.) Some studies go as far as to do sham surgeries, including anesthesia, incisions, stitches — the works.

3) Double-blind: A study is "blind" if the participants don't know whether they are in the experimental group or the control group. For example, you don't want someone knowing if she's received a real drug or a fake drugbecause her expectations could change the outcome of the study.

A study is "double-blind" if the researchers in personal contact with participants also don't know which treatment they are administering. You don't want the nurse giving out pills to know if they're real or not, because then subtle differences in her behavior could influence patients, and therefore the results.


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Evidence on the cost and cost-effectiveness of palliative care: A literature review

Conclusion: Despite wide variation in study type, characteristic and study quality, there are consistent patterns in the results. Palliative care is most frequently found to be less costly relative to comparator groups, and in most cases, the difference in cost is statistically significant.

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L’intelligence collective : un nouveau leadership ?

L’intelligence collective : un nouveau leadership ? | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Dans un monde incertain, changeant, global et ultra connecté, les modes de leadership traditionnels qui intronisaient un chef clairvoyant,...
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How to exploit twitter for public health monitoring?

How to exploit twitter for public health monitoring? | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Detecting hints to public health threats as early as possible is crucial to prevent harm from the population. However, many disease surveillance strategies rely upon data whose collection requires explicit reporting (data transmitted from hospitals, laboratories or physicians).


Collecting reports takes time so that the reaction time grows. Moreover, context information on individual cases is often lost in the collection process. This paper describes a system that tries to address these limitations by processing social media for identifying information on public health threats. The primary objective is to study the usefulness of the approach for supporting the monitoring of a population's health status.


The experiments show that the system provides information on health events identified in social media. Signals are mainly generated from Twitter messages posted by news agencies. Personal tweets, i.e. tweets from persons observing some symptoms, only play a minor role for signal generation given a limited volume of relevant messages. Relevant signals referring to real world outbreaks were generated by the system and monitored by epidemiologists for example during the European football championship.


But, the number of relevant signals among generated signals is still very small: The different experiments yielded a proportion between 5 and 20% of signals regarded as "relevant" by the users. Vaccination or education campaigns communicated via Twitter as well as use of medical terms in other contexts than for outbreak reporting led to the generation of irrelevant signals.


Conclusions: The aggregation of information into signals results in a reduction of monitoring effort compared to other existing systems. Against expectations, only few messages are of personal nature, reporting on personal symptoms. Instead, media reports are distributed over social media channels.


Despite the high percentage of irrelevant signals generated by the system, the users reported that the effort in monitoring aggregated information in form of signals is less demanding than monitoring huge social-media data streams manually. It remains for the future to develop strategies for reducing false alarms.


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Comment définir la “santé connectée” (ou l’e-santé) ?
● Le concept : …

Comment définir la “santé connectée” (ou l’e-santé) ?<br/>● Le concept : … | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Comment définir la “santé connectée” (ou l’e-santé) ?
● Le concept : 
Aujourd’hui, il nous est possible de suivre et d’évaluer notre forme et notre santé… - MyBiody Balance – Google+

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A Roadmap for Patient and Family Engagement

A Roadmap for Patient and Family Engagement | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Blog post by Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and American Institutes for Research As the U.S. health care system tackles the Triple Aim of better experiences of care, better population health and...
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Epistemic Authority: A Theory of Trust, Authority, and Autonomy in Belief

Epistemic Authority: A Theory of Trust, Authority, and Autonomy in Belief | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
(2014). Epistemic Authority: A Theory of Trust, Authority, and Autonomy in Belief. International Journal of Philosophical Studies: Vol. 22, No. 5, pp. 771-775. doi: 10.1080/09672559.2014.977553
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Are states spending enough on tobacco control and prevention?

Are states spending enough on tobacco control and prevention? | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
A new report finds that states plan to dedicate less than 15 percent of what the CDC recommends they spend on tobacco control and prevention.
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Risk and choice in childbirth: Problems of evidence and ethics? - Journal of Medical Ethics

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Clinical Education and the Electronic Health Record: The Flipped Patient - JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association

Clinical Education and the Electronic Health Record: The Flipped Patient - JAMA:  The Journal of the American Medical Association | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Opinion from JAMA — Clinical Education and the Electronic Health Record — The Flipped Patient

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IBM's Watson is better at diagnosing cancer than human doctors (Wired UK)

IBM's Watson is better at diagnosing cancer than human doctors (Wired UK) | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Watson, IBM claims, is better at cancer diagnosis than human doctors, and its deployment could also reduce healthcare costs
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Why do we want the right to die? A systematic review of the international literature on the views of patients, carers and the public on assisted dying

Conclusion: Our review sheds light on ordinary people’s perspectives about assisted dying, when they are ill or disabled. Unbearable suffering is a key construct, and common factors are revealed that lead people to ask for help to die. The consistency of international views indicates a mandate for legislative and medical systems worldwide to listen and understand this.

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The patient segmentation model

The patient segmentation model | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Dividing patients into groups based on how they behave towards their condition can aid understanding of the issues that affect them and improve outcomes, such as quality of life in long-term conditions. Market segmentation is the fancy marketer's...
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Using continuous sedation until death for cancer patients: A qualitative interview study of physicians’ and nurses’ practice in three European countries

Conclusion: This qualitative analysis suggests that there is systematic variation in end-of-life care sedation practice and its conceptualization in the United Kingdom, Belgium and the Netherlands.

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How many people need palliative care? A study developing and comparing methods for population-based estimates

Conclusions: Death registration data using both underlying and contributory causes can give reliable estimates of the population-based need for palliative care, without needing symptom or hospital activity data. In high-income countries, 69%–82% of those who die need palliative care.

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The young have paid enough for austerity in Britain. It is time for oldies to pay more. The Economist

The young have paid enough for austerity in Britain. It is time for oldies to pay more. The Economist | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
“TODAY, we take decisive action to deal with the debts we have inherited.” So declared George Osborne, Britain’s chancellor, in 2010 when announcing his plans...
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Compassion fatigue: the cost some workers pay for caring

Compassion fatigue: the cost some workers pay for caring | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Health and social workers often choose their profession because they want to help people. But seeing trauma and suffering on a regular basis can have a deep impact on these workers. “Compassion fatigue” is a response to the stress of caring for people at times of crisis and is often referred to as the cost of caring.

Researchers first identified compassion fatigue in the 1970s when they recognised certain psychological symptoms among health care and social service workers. The term “compassion fatigue” was coined in the early 1990s to describe nurses who worked in emergency care and were experiencing symptoms similar to burnout.

Via Edwin Rutsch
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The Death of the Patient: Moving from 'Healthcare' to 'Health' and 'Patient' to 'Person'

The Death of the Patient: Moving from 'Healthcare' to 'Health' and 'Patient' to 'Person' | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Today, if you speak to anyone in the healthcare world, the discussion always begins and ends with making the change to a “patient centered care model” or putting the patient at the center of the care continuum. So much so, we recently added a “5th P” - Personal Responsibility - [...]
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