Co-creation in health
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"This is a great day for patients": the Hospital Safety Score

"This is a great day for patients": the Hospital Safety Score | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

A place where art, medicine, social media and pop-culture collide and create a patient voice in health information technology.


Via Andrew Spong, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Co-creation in health
E-citizens, e-patients, communities in shaping e-health, health literacy.
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Why Physicians Need ‘Right Compassion’

Why Physicians Need ‘Right Compassion’ | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
To be effective in relieving suffering, doctors must strike a balance between paucity and excess of empathy.


As a young doctor working in the E.R. my capacity for compassion, and that of my colleagues, was often stretched; this was particularly the case when my patients could be said to have brought misfortune on themselves. I saw drug addicts suffering overdose, teenagers retching after self-poisoning, thieves injured through being arrested, all treated more brusquely than other theoretically more blameless patients.


I tried hard to maintain empathy, reflecting that the overdosed, self-poisoned and criminal may no more have brought their problems on themselves than those with skiing or horse-riding injuries or heart palpitations through overwork.


But it’s complicated: I’ve stitched up many slashed wrists cut not through willfulness but as a release from intense anguish; I’ve attended alcoholics for whom alcohol was clearly a substitute for love.


I may not have always succeeded, but I always hoped that my humanity, or my professional duty to provide a high standard of care, would step in when my compassion was running low.



By GAVIN FRANCIS
NY Time  Opinion Pages
 

image

http://bit.ly/dP1O76


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13 stunning stats on patient-centricity

13 stunning stats on patient-centricity | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Digital transformation means your patients are also customers

Health care organizations looking to succeed at digital transformation must be sure they are reading patient charts correctly.

With the health care IT market expected to be worth $280.25 billion by 2021 as both clinical and non-clinical information systems are deployed, health care organizations will only see the best return-on-investment from their digital initiatives if they properly leverage patient insight.

Right now, however, the prognosis isn’t good; many health care organizations are doing a poor job of reading their customers’ vitals.

Clearly, there’s been a misdiagnosis. The 13 stats below highlight what health care providers need to consider to become truly patient-centric organizations.

Misdiagnosis of patient satisfaction

One of the biggest challenges to becoming patient-centric is the lack of available metrics for health care providers. Too often, there is a mismatch between the services offered and whether those services are well received by patients.

1. Research by Prophet found that 81 percent of consumers are unsatisfied with their health care experience, and the less they interact with the system, the happier they are.

2. And while 63 percent of health care organizations believe they are delivering on patient care, only 43 percent of patients actually agree.  

 

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“Worse Than Big Tobacco”: How Big Pharma Fuels the Opioid Epidemic. A Market for Lies

“Worse Than Big Tobacco”: How Big Pharma Fuels the Opioid Epidemic. A Market for Lies | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
“Worse Than Big Tobacco”: How Big Pharma Fuels the Opioid Epidemic

By Lynn Parramore

OCT 10, 2017 | HEALTHCARE

Over a 40-year career, Philadelphia attorney Daniel Berger has obtained millions in settlements for investors and consumers hurt by a rogues’ gallery of corporate wrongdoers, from Exxon to R.J. Reynolds Tobacco. But when it comes to what America’s prescription drug makers have done to drive one of the ghastliest addiction crises in the country’s history, he confesses amazement.

“I used to think that there was nothing more reprehensible than what the tobacco industry did in suppressing what it knew about the adverse effects of an addictive and dangerous product,” says Berger. “But I was wrong. The drug makers are worse than Big Tobacco.”

The U.S. prescription drug industry has opened a new frontier in public havoc, manipulating markets and deceptively marketing opioid drugs that are known to addict and even kill. It’s a national emergency that claims 90 lives per day. Berger lays much of the blame at the feet of companies that have played every dirty trick imaginable to convince doctors to overprescribe medication that can transform fresh-faced teens and mild-mannered adults into zombified junkies.

 

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Yannick Pelletier - The Hedgehog - a universal system against 1.c4 and 1.Nf3

This is a sample of the DVD The Hedgehog - a universal system against 1.c4 and 1.Nf3 by Yannick Pelletier. More info through above mentioned link!

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Millenials and Boomers on “eHealth”

Millenials and Boomers on “eHealth” | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

KEY TAKEAWAY: There are some differences between the way Millennials and Boomers approach health, but there is also a lot of consistency.  eHealth is often talked about within our industry, but how many have really asked consumers what THEY think about eHealth?

 

The last two days I have been sitting behind the darked glass listening to Millennials and Boomets talk about eHeath.  Specifically, we our client was interested in finding out the opportunities for eHealth and what each demographic segment expected. With our client’s permission here are some topline findings:

1ne: Millennials are more likely than Boomers to use eHealth tools including online consultations with doctors and using the Internet to compare treatment costs and outcomes.

2wo: The majority of Boomers said they use the Internet for health.  Specifically, they are looking to learn all they can about their health issues BEFORE seeing their doctor.  Millennials, on the other hand, prefer to use the Internet to manage their health and want a solution that offers consultation to Rx option.

3hree: We were surprised to hear, when asked for top health online resources, WebMD was hardly mentioned.  More are using another third party resource sites and social media.


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What do empowered and engaged really mean?  e-Patient Dave deBronkart

In participatory medicine we say that e-patients are "empowered and engaged." But what does that really mean, in practice? This 9 minute presentation offer
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Lavorare troppo non è figo - di Luca Foresti

Lavorare troppo non è figo - di Luca Foresti | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Il numero di ore lavorate, per chi lavora, in media, continua a calare, un po’ ovunque: Ma dentro alla media c’è una parte dei lavoratori che invece lavora molte ore.

 

Gli stimoli che riceviamo durante le ore di lavoro tendono a essere più monocordi. Tendono a renderci più rigidi. Ecco perché secondo me lavorare troppo peggiora anche la performance sul lavoro. Do per scontato che le persone abbiano la maturità e abilità per spingere sull’acceleratore quando ce n’è bisogno e quindi possano spendere brevi periodi di tempo in cui lavorano molto di più. Ma questi periodi non possono diventare la normalità.

Lavorare troppo a mio parere non è figo, non è segno di equilibrio, non deve essere incensato come un comportamento da imitare.

Abbiamo bisogno di diventare persone capaci di lavorare bene e forte quando lo facciamo e di dedicare sempre più tempo ad altro.

Anche per fare in modo che quando ci avviciniamo alla nostra fine, guardando alla nostra vita possiamo dire che è stata degna di essere vissuta.

Twitter @lforesti

 
 
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The self-testing revolution has arrived, but what does instant diagnosis mean for patients and the healthcare system?

The self-testing revolution has arrived, but what does instant diagnosis mean for patients and the healthcare system? | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

 Since the first home pregnancy test in the 1960s, self-testing kits for diseases and conditions such as human papilloma virus (HPV), diabetes and high cholesterol have emerged online or in pharmacies.

Meanwhile, in many areas of the UK, home-testing kits for chlamydia, gonorrhoea and others have become available as free locally-commissioned healthcare services.

Self-diagnosis goes beyond a vague internet search; it is becoming the norm. Pharma will be keeping its own finger on the pulse as increased diagnosis leads to greater demand for products.

 

Early days

Dr Clare Morrison, GP at online doctor and pharmacy MedExpress says: “These tests will probably cause more pressure on primary care, as patients will want to ask about abnormal results with an expert, but they aren’t necessarily a bad thing for patients. If a patient knows that they are positive for HPV, for example, they can make sure they get regular cervical smears to pick up abnormalities.”

Although self–testing can be of benefit, there can be other factors at play that may affect test results. “Glucose testing isn’t a bad idea if you have reason to suspect diabetes, perhaps because of excessive thirst or a strong family history, but bear in mind the fact that it will be affected by anything you have eaten recently,” cautions Dr Morrison.

“Just because you test negative, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you are entirely safe. High cholesterol and diabetes are more common as you age and gain weight, so testing when you’re young and slim may not detect it,” adds Dr Morrison. Go to medexpress.co.uk

 

Downsides

Superdrug pharmacist Tim Morgan urges patients to follow up: “In crude terms, some tests are more accurate than others and most home tests do not boast 100% accuracy. Although home-testing kits increase accessibility, if there is no process behind the test that allows the patient to receive advice around, for example, safe sex and STI prevention, then the test itself is not encouraging behaviour change.”

Self-testing kits for conditions such as diabetes are readily available online, however, charity Diabetes UK does not recommend their use to diagnose the condition. Douglas Twenefour, Deputy Head of Care for Diabetes UK, advises: “We would not recommend people to use a self-diagnosing kit if they are worried they have diabetes. Self-diagnosis results might not be accurate, as blood glucose levels vary in all individuals during any given day and people might be falsely reassured,” he explains.

“In addition, a positive diagnosis can only increase anxiety if someone does not have access to information and advice provided by a trained healthcare professional.”

 

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La technologie ne va pas faire disparaître le médecin - Philippe Coucke

La technologie ne va pas faire disparaître le médecin - Philippe Coucke | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

«La technologie ne va pas faire disparaître le médecin. Elle va le rendre plus disponible pour s’investir dans l’humain, l’accompagnement du patient...», selon Philippe Coucke, 

Pour pouvoir travailler dans les meilleures conditions le médecin doit bénéficier d’une structure avec des systèmes intégrés, une acquisition des données dans des formats standard, un bon stockage et une fine analyse des données et surtout une sécurité et une sauvegarde de la vie privée. Pour lui, il faut «associer le big data à l’intelligence artificielle». Actuellement, le programme d’intelligence artificielle IBM Watson est déjà en mesure, en fonction du profil de pathologie encodé, de proposer dans certains cas le meilleur choix thérapeutique. Pour lui, la médecine de demain devra donc plus que jamais être davantage préventive, prédictive, personnalisée et participative...


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A Rough Guide to Spotting Bad Science

A Rough Guide to Spotting Bad Science | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

A brief detour from chemistry, branching out into science in general today. This graphic looks at the different factors that can contribute towards ‘bad’ science – it was inspired by the research I carried out for the recent aluminium chlorohydrate graphic, where many articles linked the compound to causing breast cancer, referencing scientific research which drew questionable conclusions from their results.

 

The vast majority of people will get their science news from online news site articles, and rarely delve into the research that the article is based on. Personally, I think it’s therefore important that people are capable of spotting bad scientific methods, or realising when articles are being economical with the conclusions drawn from research, and that’s what this graphic aims to do. Note that this is not a comprehensive overview, nor is it implied that the presence of one of the points noted automatically means that the research should be disregarded. This is merely intended to provide a rough guide to things to be alert to when either reading science articles or evaluating research.

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Making Patients and Doctors Happier — The Potential of Patient-Reported Outcomes — NEJM

Making Patients and Doctors Happier — The Potential of Patient-Reported Outcomes — NEJM | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
Measuring relevant outcomes in a timely manner is a priority in a health care system increasingly focused on the delivery of high-value care. Most quality measures focus on care processes or downstream outcomes such as survival; until recently, there has been less emphasis on quantitative measurements of functional outcomes, symptoms, and quality of life. Measuring patient-reported outcomes (PROs) with standardized questionnaires is one way of getting this information. PRO collection has proliferated in oncology, where it has been linked to improved symptom management, enhanced quality of life, and longer survival.1 Given these benefits, payers have started to encourage providers to incorporate PRO collection into routine care. For example, the Medicare Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement model includes financial incentives for hospitals to collect and submit PRO data for patients undergoing elective hip or knee replacement.
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Addressing Vaccine Hesitancy: complacency, convenience and confidence.

Addressing Vaccine Hesitancy: complacency, convenience and confidence. | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Definition: Vaccine Hesitancy

Vaccine hesitancy refers to delay in acceptance or refusal of vaccines despite availability of vaccination services. Vaccine hesitancy is complex and context specific, varying across time, place and vaccines. It is influenced by factors such as complacency, convenience and confidence.

 

1. The scope of vaccine hesitancy does not apply to situations where vaccine uptake is low because of poor availability e.g. lack of vaccine (stock outs), lack of offer or access to vaccines, unacceptable travel/distances to reach immunization clinics, poor vaccine program communication, etc.

2. In low uptake situations where lack of available services is the major factor, hesitancy can be present but is not the principle reason for unvaccinated and undervaccinated members of the community. In these settings, improving services is the priority. 3. As the Complacency, Convenience and Confidence (“3Cs”) model of vaccine hesitancy determinants succinctly categorized many factors it was embedded in the definition.

4. The more complex Working Group Vaccine Hesitancy Determinants Matrix (see below), with determinants in three main categories (contextual, individual and group and vaccine/vaccination specific influences) was more useful for guidance on development of vaccine hesitancy indicators, survey questions, diagnostic tools, and strategies for intervention, and research.

5. Concerns about vaccine safety may be associated with vaccine hesitancy. However, it is important not to equate vaccine hesitancy and vaccine safety. Safety is only one driver of vaccine hesitancy. Nevertheless, in situations where vaccine safety is one of the underlying causes of vaccine hesitancy, using appropriate best practices to address concerns over adverse events following immunization, can minimize the potential negative impact that may result.

6. Communication is a key tool for success of any immunization program but is not a specific determinant in vaccine hesitancy. However, inadequate or poor communication about vaccines (e.g., why they are recommended and their safety and effectiveness) can contribute to vaccine hesitancy.

7. To achieve vaccine demand as per GVAP Strategic Objective 2, not only must vaccine hesitancy be addressed, but communities must be supported in seeing value in vaccines for individuals

8 and for communities and in conveying their vaccine needs and perspectives on how vaccine programs are delivered to key decision makers. However, having communities demand current or new vaccines is a step beyond the scope of SAGE’s desire to address vaccine hesitancy and increase vaccination acceptance.

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Advocacy groups get some, but not all, trial data on Gilead hepatitis C drugs

Advocacy groups get some, but not all, trial data on Gilead hepatitis C drugs | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
After a two-year battle, a pair of public health advocacy groups obtained sought-after clinical trial data from regulators for two hepatitis C treatments sold by Gilead Sciences (GILD). But they failed to gain access to the most coveted information that would allow researchers to independently verify test results which were originally generated by the company.
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Giovanna : "chaque malade que j'ai rencontré a été particulièrement touchant" - We Are Patients | Histoires de patients et malades

Giovanna : "chaque malade que j'ai rencontré a été particulièrement touchant" - We Are Patients | Histoires de patients et malades | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Avocate italienne, Giovanna vit aujourd’hui à Paris où elle met en œuvre son engagement dans les questions de parité, d’égalité et d’accès aux droits des malades. Actuellement en mission au Service public d’Information Santé au Ministère de la santé, elle est également à l’initiative de Cancer Contribution.

Présente à l’Université d’Été des déserts médicaux et numériques début septembre, elle a accepté de répondre à nos questions. Giovanna évoque notamment son engagement auprès des sujets fragilisés.


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Minds turned to ash. Is burnout simply the result of working too hard? The Economist - Josh Cohen

Minds turned to ash. Is burnout simply the result of working too hard? The Economist - Josh  Cohen | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

When Steve first came to my consulting room, it was hard to square the shambling figure slumped low in the chair opposite with the young dynamo who, so he told me, had only recently been putting in 90-hour weeks at an investment bank. Clad in baggy sportswear that had not graced the inside of a washing machine for a while, he listlessly tugged his matted hair, while I tried, without much success, to picture him gliding imperiously down the corridors of some glassy corporate palace.

Steve had grown up as an only child in an affluent suburb. He recalls his parents, now divorced, channelling the frustrations of their loveless, quarrelsome marriage into the ferocious cultivation of their son. The straight-A grades, baseball-team captaincy and Ivy League scholarship he eventually won had, he felt, been destined pretty much from the moment he was born. “It wasn’t so much like I was doing all this great stuff, more like I was slotting into the role they’d already scripted for me.” It seemed as though he’d lived the entirety of his childhood and adolescence on autopilot, so busy living out the life expected of him that he never questioned whether he actually wanted it.

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Very Few Patient Groups Don’t Take Pharma Money

Very Few Patient Groups Don’t Take Pharma Money | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Most patient and consumer advocacy groups receive funds from the pharmaceutical industry, according to a new study released by the group PharmedOut.

 

Only a handful out of 7,685 health advocacy groups in the U.S. are completely independent of pharmaceutical industry money, according to a list the group released Oct. 13. PharmedOut is a Georgetown University Medical Center project that advances evidence-based prescribing and educates health-care professionals about pharmaceutical marketing practices.

 

And industry funding of patient groups, including websites and informational materials, is often not apparent to the average consumer, which could mislead consumers into believing they’re getting unbiased health advice.

 

“Industry funding is often not disclosed on websites or informational materials or is hidden,” PharmedOut Director Adriane Fugh-Berman told me in an Oct. 16 phone call. Funding and sponsorship is often very subtle and difficult to identify, she said.

 

In addition, she said, industry sponsorship can affect the stands patient and consumer groups are willing to take, she said.

 

Groups that accept industry funding are affected by that money, regardless of whether they think they are, she said.

 

"Look at the stands taken and not taken,” she said. “For example, where is the anger and outrage about drug costs?”

 

Fugh-Berman is an associate professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Physiology and in the Department of Family Medicine at Georgetown University Medical Center.

 

Further Reading:

  • “Pharma 'Patient Centricity' Aids & Abets the Opioid Epidemic”; http://sco.lt/5RJse1

  •  “93% of Patient Advocacy Groups Included in FDA Funding Discussions Receive $ from Pharma”; http://sco.lt/8jkvFh

  • “Patient Advocacy Groups with Funding & Form Letter from @PhRMA Oppose Nevada Legislation”; http://sco.lt/6QlP9N
  • “More Than Two-thirds of Patient Advocacy Groups Receive Industry Funding”; http://sco.lt/6Ftgzh

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da P. P. Pasolini sul consumismo e la mutazione antropologica

testi tratti dagli scritti di Pasolini lettura valter zanardi
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Lettera a una professoressa

"Io non considero che chi sappia leggere la gazzetta dello sport sappia leggere"
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Pharma must radically rethink its engagement with doctors... - Truth About Doctors - McCann Health

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The pharma industry can’t fix its reputation until it honestly faces up to its problems. Is it time for an industry ethical code?

The pharma industry can’t fix its reputation until it honestly faces up to its problems. Is it time for an industry ethical code? | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
In many ways, the pharma industry deserves its bad press. But treating the industry as a single, unified entity is unfair to the many ethical companies that wouldn’t dream of price gouging. However, I think that lobby groups (for example, the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry, the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations, and the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America) are doing the industry a disservice by defending unethical behavior. Of course, the industry does a lot of good, but we must acknowledge and take action against the bad. It is for this reason that I have set out to develop an ethical code for the pharma industry.
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Global Survey Reveals "Key Opinion Leader" (KOL) is the Most Commonly Used Term by Pharmaceutical Industry

Global Survey Reveals "Key Opinion Leader" (KOL) is the Most Commonly Used Term by Pharmaceutical Industry | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

The Medical Science Liaison Society (MSL Society), the only 501(c)(3) non-profit organization exclusively dedicated to advancing the global medical science liaison (MSL) profession, has released the results of a first-of-its-kind global survey among MSL and Medical Affairs professionals regarding the most common term used to describe the physicians and other health care providers, whose opinions are highly regarded, and who influence other physicians.

 

The survey included 473 respondents from 54 countries and consisted of Executive Management/VP's of Medical Affairs, Manager/Director of MSLs, Medical Science Liaisons, Medical Advisors, and MSL trainers. Respondents also identified their company type as either Large pharma, Medium pharma, Small pharma, Biotechnology, Contract MSL Organization, CRO, Diagnostic Company, or Medical Device.     

A key finding from the survey is that 60 percent of respondents from pharmaceutical companies reported that their company uses the term Key Opinion Leader (KOL).

 

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Niente asilo senza vaccino. Sono guelfo o ghibellino? Complacency, convenience and confidence

Niente asilo senza vaccino. Sono guelfo o ghibellino? Complacency, convenience and confidence | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

La scelta di porre un filtro per sancire un diritto/dovere sacrosanto, condiviso fra individuo e comunità qual è quello di vaccinare i nostri bambini, mi sembra ragionevole di fronte ad una seria minaccia, anche solo potenziale, per la salute pubblica. Non bisogna però pensare che questo da solo possa bastare a invertire la rotta. Bisognerà lavorare, e lavorare duro, per aumentare la fiducia dei nostri utenti e rompere tutti i meccanismi consci e inconsci che bloccano la decisione vaccinale di molti genitori di oggi......

Resta il secondo punto, cioè il fatto che non esistano evidenze scientifiche che l’obbligo vaccinale aumenti i livelli di copertura.

 

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5 Health and Wellness Brands That Excel in Social Media Marketing - Sprinklr

5 Health and Wellness Brands That Excel in Social Media Marketing - Sprinklr | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it

Traditionally, being healthy meant a diet inspired by the food pyramid, regular exercise, and doctor’s check-ups – but today, people are living longer and working for longer.

This societal shift has changed everything. Thanks to modern technology, all that we need to monitor, maintain, and improve our health is instantly accessible. Every step we take (or don’t take) can be tracked, and the Nutrition Facts panel is now a staple of consumer reading.

For brands in the multi-trillion dollar health and wellness industry, the potential is clear. Consumers want to meet their health goals in personal, meaningful ways. On social, health and wellness brands can inspire and motivate these consumers to do exactly that.

Here are five health and wellness brands that excel in social media marketing – as determined by Sprinklr Business Index® (SBI®), which measures and analyzes the breadth of public interactions between brands and consumers across social media.

 

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Facebook is no friend to pharma

Facebook is no friend to pharma | Co-creation in health | Scoop.it
According to the Times “If I were a Facebook executive, I might feel a Frankensteinian sense of unease these days. The company has been hit with a series of scandals that have bruised its image, enraged its critics and opened up the possibility that in its quest for global dominance, Facebook may have created something it can’t fully control.”  And they want pharma to advertise more?
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