Cloud Atlas
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Then, there’s blackface, redface, yellowface—any of the faces not your own—and, they are so not on.

And, you’d think that we wouldn’t have to have the conversation about why blackface et...

Then, there’s blackface, redface, yellowface—any of the faces not your own—and, they are so not on.<br/><br/>And, you’d think that we wouldn’t have to have the conversation about why blackface et... | Cloud Atlas | Scoop.it
Trie | Op-Ed: Cultural Appropriation and Halloween Costumes (via therainbowhub) ("Then, there’s blackface, redface, yellowface—any of the faces not your own—and, they are so not on...." http://t.co/aHhJ2iMvDl)...
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NYU PSA: Don't Wear An Offensive Halloween Costume - NYU Local

NYU PSA: Don't Wear An Offensive Halloween Costume - NYU Local | Cloud Atlas | Scoop.it
NYU PSA: Don't Wear An Offensive Halloween Costume
NYU Local
This includes blackface (and brownface, yellowface, redface, and any other modification of skin color for dramatic effect). Stay your own skin color.
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Yellowface! - The History of Racist Asian Stereotypes

Yellowface! - The History of Racist Asian Stereotypes | Cloud Atlas | Scoop.it
A brief History of Yellowface - Racist Asian Stereotypes

Via John Jung
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John Jung's curator insight, July 23, 2013 2:25 PM

Excellent resource on the history of racist Asian imagery.  Subtopics include:

Legal Discrimination and Violence Against Asian Immigrants

As a trickle turned into a flood, (between 1850 and 1930, about one million Asians from China, Japan, Korea, the Philippines, and India came to the United States) a backlash soon developed.

Yellowface on Stage

"Yellowface" portrayals date to at least 1767 in the United States, when Arthur Murphy's theatrical work The Orphan of China was presented in Philadelphia. 

Yellowface in Film and TV

Whites in Yellowface have a long history on screen, beginning with Mary Pickford’s Cio-Cio San in Madame Butterfly (1915). 

Yellowface Whitewashing

A phenomenon wherein white actors are cast to portray what were originally non-white characters is called "whitewashing." Instead of using yellow face makeup, the film makers change the race or origin of the characters.

Yellowface in Europe

The most blatant contemporary example of Yellowface in Western European media is a character created by Dutch TV and later adopted by Danish TV called Ushi; a caricature of a Japanese woman, but played by white women. 

Yellowface Caricatures in Politics

In 1997, The National Review magazine published an illustrated cover of then President Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton and Vice President Al Gore, in stereotypical Oriental garb and featuring caricatured features, buck teeth and slanted eyes.

shelby's curator insight, April 16, 2015 2:26 PM

MODULE 4

 

 

Yellow peril is a stereotype made against Asian Americans that started in the 1890s in California. They were viewed at a threat and the movement began with a goal to make California racially pure. Asians were first welcomed was cheap labor by after the gold rush brought thousands of Asians, they were being to be seen as a threat.

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Cloud Atlas: how Hollywood failed to put it on the map - The Guardian

Cloud Atlas: how Hollywood failed to put it on the map - The Guardian | Cloud Atlas | Scoop.it
Phil Hoad: The film's release should have been a global event, but its studio's reticence over its fragmented form has led to disappointing box office returns.
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The first rule of blackface: It's not hard to understand, everyone - Salon

The first rule of blackface: It's not hard to understand, everyone - Salon | Cloud Atlas | Scoop.it
Salon
The first rule of blackface: It's not hard to understand, everyone
Salon
(Or brownface or yellowface or redface) It's that simple. To do so is utterly and incontestably racist and needlessly insensitive.
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