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When Did Our Evolutionary Ancestors Start Tasting Like Chicken?

When Did Our Evolutionary Ancestors Start Tasting Like Chicken? | Skylarking Bookmarks | Scoop.it

Tasting like chicken. Its evolutionary origins.

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The Possibility of Self-Sacrifice

The Possibility of Self-Sacrifice | Skylarking Bookmarks | Scoop.it

Normally, death is present in our lives as an ending-yet-to-arrive. For most of us, Simone Weil writes, “Death appears as a limit set in advance on the future.” We make plans, pursue goals, navigate relationships—all under the condition of death. We lead our lives under the condition of death; our actions are shaped by it as a surface is shaped by its boundaries.

However, as we approach this boundary, when our end is present, we are nothing but terror. All pursuits disintegrate, and our self-understanding collapses. At once we are expelled from the sphere of meaning. We are nothing more than this body. This body and its last breath. It is not simply that we cannot survive our own death; we cannot bear the sight of it. We do not want to die. Not now.

And yet the possibility of self-sacrifice suggests that this terror can be overcome, that death can be meaningful.

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The New Academic Celebrity

Theory thumpers are so 90s. What TED and the rest of the “ideas” circuit prize are upbeat wizards of science and social science.
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Charlie Chaplin, monster

Charlie Chaplin, monster | Skylarking Bookmarks | Scoop.it
No actual birth certificate for Charles Spencer Chaplin has ever been found. The actor himself drew a blank when he went on a rummage in Somerset House. The latest research…
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“Against World Literature”: The Debate in Retrospect

“Against World Literature”: The Debate in Retrospect | Skylarking Bookmarks | Scoop.it
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How Matisse and Picasso turned old age into art

How Matisse and Picasso turned old age into art | Skylarking Bookmarks | Scoop.it
How Matisse and Picasso turned old age into art In March 1946 Pablo Picasso paid one of his fortnightly visits to see Henri Matisse in Vence, a few miles inland from Nice. Five years after the medical crisis that had nearly killed him, Matisse, at
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The Legend of Vera Nabokov: Why Writers Pine for a Do-It-All Spouse

The Legend of Vera Nabokov: Why Writers Pine for a Do-It-All Spouse | Skylarking Bookmarks | Scoop.it
The rarity of spouses like Vladimir Nabokov's, who dedicated her life to supporting his career, may be hindering gender parity in literature.
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The Mental Life of Plants and Worms, Among Others

by Oliver Sacks

The Mental Life of Plants and Worms, Among Others<br/><br/> by Oliver Sacks | Skylarking Bookmarks | Scoop.it
We all distinguish between plants and animals. We understand that plants, in general, are immobile, rooted in the ground; they spread their green leaves to the heavens and feed on sunlight and soil. We understand that animals, in contrast, are mobile, moving from place to place, foraging or hunting for food; they have easily recognized behaviors of various sorts. Plants and animals have evolved along two profoundly different paths (fungi have yet another), and they are wholly different in their forms and modes of life. And yet, Darwin insisted, they were closer than one might think.
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Ian Hamilton’s brilliance, busted | TLS

Ian Hamilton’s brilliance, busted | TLS | Skylarking Bookmarks | Scoop.it
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The Greatest Ex-Nazi Writer

The Greatest Ex-Nazi Writer | Skylarking Bookmarks | Scoop.it
Gottfreid Benn was a Nazi very briefly in the early 1930s. Why did it erase him from literary history?
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‘The Rise’ and ‘The Up Side of Down’

‘The Rise’ and ‘The Up Side of Down’ | Skylarking Bookmarks | Scoop.it
Two new books present failure — personal and professional — as a quintessential part of success.
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Peter Matthiessen’s Homegoing

Peter Matthiessen’s Homegoing | Skylarking Bookmarks | Scoop.it
At the end of the author’s life of searching, this is what contentment looks like.
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William Faulkner in Hollywood

William Faulkner in Hollywood | Skylarking Bookmarks | Scoop.it
The biggest name in Southern lit didn’t spend his whole life in Mississippi
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Father of the Wild Things

Father of the Wild Things | Skylarking Bookmarks | Scoop.it
Maurice Sendak and the 'awful vulnerability of children'
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A Keeper of Love’s Flame: Regine Olsen and Søren Kierkegaard -

After Kierkegaard cast off his fiancée Regine, her presence haunted his work throughout his career. But what was her story?
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How Dante Saved My Life

How Dante Saved My Life | Skylarking Bookmarks | Scoop.it
A midlife crisis is cured by The Divine Comedy
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The art world we deserve?

The art world we deserve? | Skylarking Bookmarks | Scoop.it
The term “art world” was coined in the mid-1960s by Arthur Coleman Danto, the influential American critic and pioneer of art theory who died in October 2013. Unlike the traditional art of representation, which sought to manifest the power and
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The Big Read: Can a Single Book Sum Up a Nation?

The Big Read: Can a Single Book Sum Up a Nation? | Skylarking Bookmarks | Scoop.it
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Why Do So Many Leftists Want Sex Work to Be the New Normal?

Why Do So Many Leftists Want Sex Work to Be the New Normal? | Skylarking Bookmarks | Scoop.it
On the left, prostitution used to be seen as a bad thing: part of the general degradation of the working class, and the subjugation of women, under capitalism. Women who sold sex were victims, forced by circumstances into a painful and humiliating way of life, and socialism would liberate them.
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Do We Know Philip Roth?

Do We Know Philip Roth? | Skylarking Bookmarks | Scoop.it
He’s sprinkled doppelgängers all over his work. But they amount to an ingenious camouflage.
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WHEN YEARS ARE CELEBS

WHEN YEARS ARE CELEBS | Skylarking Bookmarks | Scoop.it
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War is good for us

War is good for us | Skylarking Bookmarks | Scoop.it
At the heart of this work is a startling and improbable statistic and the equally surprising and counterintuitive thesis that flows out of it. We are used to looking back…
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A love of desolation and ruins

A love of desolation and ruins | Skylarking Bookmarks | Scoop.it
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The Germ Theory of Democracy, Dictatorship, and Your Cherished Beliefs

The Germ Theory of Democracy, Dictatorship, and Your Cherished Beliefs | Skylarking Bookmarks | Scoop.it
Is culture just a side effect of the struggle to avoid disease?
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The Walter Benjamin Brigade

The Walter Benjamin Brigade | Skylarking Bookmarks | Scoop.it
The German Jewish intellectual Walter Benjamin, born in Berlin in 1892, dead by his own hand on the French-Spanish border in 1940, remains a man of mystery. Anything but prominent in his lifetime, he has emerged in recent decades to unvarnished acclaim as the greatest thinker of the 20th century in fields ranging from philosophy to sociology, aesthetics, literary theory and criticism, and a half-dozen more. This in itself is mysterious. Among the ranks of mid-century Central European intellectuals, the reputation of Benjamin’s contemporaries and colleagues (with the possible exception of the Frankfurt School philosopher Theodor Adorno) continues to shrink; his continues to rise and rise. The number of books and articles devoted to him is staggering; a huge new biography, Walter Benjamin: A Critical Life, co-written by Howard Eiland and Michael W. Jennings and published by Harvard, is only the latest addition to a seemingly unending stream.
How to explain the Benjamin vogue? Eiland and Jennings cite such cultural signposts as the radical student movement of the 1960s and the attendant revival of Marxist thought. But 60s radicals were hardly great readers, and Benjamin’s writings are, to say the least, maddeningly opaque and often altogether inaccessible. As for his Marxism, such as it was: if that is the main point of attraction, by rights the real culture hero should be his contemporary Herbert Marcuse (1898-1979)—once famed as the “father of the New Left” but, these days, decidedly not a name to conjure with.
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Still in the grip of the Great War

Still in the grip of the Great War | Skylarking Bookmarks | Scoop.it
WITH four months to go before the centenary of the start of the first world war, the bombardment of new books from competing historians is growing heavier. Unlike...
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