Clinical leadership
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Successful long term care should be person-centred and institutional boundaries must be redrawn or erased

Successful long term care should be person-centred and institutional boundaries must be redrawn or erased | Clinical leadership | Scoop.it

For much of the 20th century, the biomedical model of care constructed around hospitals served us well. It was ideal for a time when a paternalistic approach to disease was deemed as the right way to go. But in a world of Web 2.0, with an ageing demographic and where multiple conditions are becoming the norm, it is no longer appropriate to suggest that "doctor knows best".

In the report, A promise to learn – a commitment to act, Don Berwick, the legendary patient safety guru, set out four guiding principles. One of these is to engage, empower and hear patients and carers throughout the entire system and at all times.

The point made was that engaging and hearing patients will lead us to understand how current experience suggests poor co-ordination between healthcare and community support. It also hints that poor engagement results in individuals not admitting when and with what they need help – and this cannot be good for patients or the professionals trying to help them.

Yet, the solution must lie in the system and not within the walls of an institution. Integration is a term much bandied about in healthcare and could become a weasel word in the healthcare lexicon if the many pilots we have at present are not effectively implemented; if they don't begin to provide more care at home and in the community, and if they don't ensure a more seamless experience.

It's against this background that KPMG recently conducted a survey of 1000 patients, asking them about the future of the NHS. It revealed – surprisingly – that only 36% were comfortable with the idea of using technology, with 54% also arguing that taxes should rise to pay for healthcare.

So the public are ready to have a much more mature and sophisticated dialogue – but we need to support their informed choice so that the hospital and the A&E department are not seen as the inevitable solution.

While news of an additional £500m to A&E departments may defer some of the pain of demand over the winter, the sticking plaster approach is not going to yield the sustainable change required. The best integrated systems in the world have sustained leadership, an effective clinical leadership and engagement and have usually invested considerable sums in their IT infrastructure.

Two examples speak volumes. To begin with, take Virginia Mason in Seattle – where Gary Kaplan, the medically qualified CEO, has been in post for 15 years and where Toyota and Six Sigma approaches to clinical practice are a way of life. He says that "you don't have to be a champion, but you can't be a burier". There's also Kaiser Permanente, where almost 50% of the 9 million population can access their healthcare records online.

Yet despite these great examples of care being made fit for the 21st century, KPMG's latest report, called An Uncertain Age: re-imagining long-term care in the 21st century, suggests that few, if any societies, are facing up to the long-term care problem. Commissioned by the Lien Foundation – a Singapore philanthropic foundation – it makes the point that an ageing population coupled with changing demographics, where people move away from their home base, means the threat of less family support is becoming a reality. Add to this the growing cost of healthcare and the dwindling available funding and we need to redraw the way we provide care and the way we engage the population in that change.

As our report suggests, person-centred care is a must, institutional boundaries must be redrawn or erased and technology must play a part. Perhaps this is Berwick's most important guiding principle as, without that engagement, empowerment and listening we will not be able to make the seismic shift required to a holistic view of the system. In other words, we will not be able to move beyond the walls of the hospital, where patients and the public expect increased autonomy in return for greater responsibility for their health.


Via Chaturika Jayadewa, Medinook
Julie Hankin's insight:

A challenge to start to think outside our organisations and in systems.  This is how our patients experience us

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Physician Leadership | Clinical Integration

Physician Leadership | Clinical Integration | Clinical leadership | Scoop.it

As health care moves rapidly toward a more integrated delivery model, physicians are being tapped to take on more administrative functions.


Via Jenni Lawrence
Julie Hankin's insight:

An interesting discussion of the possible problems with increased medical leadership

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Chris Ham: Medical leadership must move from the margins to ... - BMJ

Chris Ham: Medical leadership must move from the margins to ... - BMJ | Clinical leadership | Scoop.it
A new report from the health services management centre at the University of Birmingham and The King's Fund, funded by the National Institute for Health Research, provides a comprehensive and up to date picture of the ...
Julie Hankin's insight:

Extensive study of different models of medical leadership.  However I didn't feel that it captured how my role as a clinical director in mental health currently functions.  I feel that I work more in partnership with my managing director than most of these descriptions.  (Of course I probably should check that perception with her)

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The 4 Pillars of Clinical Integration

The 4 Pillars of Clinical Integration | Clinical leadership | Scoop.it

The article describes how leading healthcare organizations create versatile Clinical Integration platforms by focusing on four pillars....Clinical integration offers both hospitals and physicians the opportunity to coordinate patient interventions, manage quality across the continuum of care, move toward population health management and pursue true value-based contracting.

1. Collaborative leadership
2. Aligned incentives
3. Clinical programs
4. Technology infrastructure

Julie Hankin's insight:

Think hospital and community care rather than the US equivalents and there is a lot of value here for the NHS

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Let's unlock the potential of NHS clinical leaders

Let's unlock the potential of NHS clinical leaders | Clinical leadership | Scoop.it
New research sheds light on the role and attitudes of frontline clinical-managers (Very good article on the importance of all types of clinical leadership.
Julie Hankin's insight:

We have to widen our view of clinical leadership and stop trying to make people fit into specific management boxes.  As a "clinician-manager" i regularly get frustrated by the assumptions that others make about what I will or wont be interested in.

 

There is a substantial challenge here for executive leaders to shift the perceptions described here and make distributed leadership a reality

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Rescooped by Julie Hankin from Fly on the Wall: Healthcare from the inside out
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Success in Healthcare: Clinical Leadership 'Development' - have we got it right?

Clinical #Leadership - Technical/hard skills first followed by soft skills. Do you get that order right? http://t.co/SETCdrbW #healthcare

Via Metta Solutions, Lauren Nichols
Julie Hankin's insight:

I agree with this distinction between skills.  We need to focus more on ensuring that all leaders have core skills in understanding and manipulating improvement data

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