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A Nation On Fire: Climate Change And The Burning Of America

A Nation On Fire: Climate Change And The Burning Of America | Climate&Vegetation | Scoop.it
Wildfires have been bad in the United States, and worsening. With a changing climate, the outlook looks even more bleak.

Via SustainOurEarth
Carter Roose's insight:

This is interesting how that wildfires have gotten bigger in the past years. It be caused by the drought that has been happening. It used to be crazy that big wildfires came. Now it is a commonplace, where it happens they are used to having big wildfires.

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Climate Change will hit Canada harder: international report

Climate Change will hit Canada harder: international report | Climate&Vegetation | Scoop.it
OTTAWA – The latest international report on climate change confirms that global warming is amplified in Canada and the trend is going to continue, the David Suzuki Foundation said Monday.

Via Art MacKay
Carter Roose's insight:

Wow cant believe that Canada is getting double the average of global warming. To me we should be trying to make things more efficient than just saying were trying. Cause they said we were gonna have alot of electric cars at least by now and not happening.

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Robert Sales's comment, October 2, 2013 3:38 PM
I can see the 2x gobal warming in uper canada but 90% of Canada's population lives with in 100 of us. Which the climate is cold but not ice/tundra. The part the is seeing this rise in wariming is almost unihabited. Then the foucus would be the animals and how to safe them and their habitat. This should effect the people
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NASA: Climate Change May Flip 40% of Earth’s Major Ecosystems like forest, grassland, tundra during this Century

NASA: Climate Change May Flip 40% of Earth’s Major Ecosystems like forest, grassland, tundra during this Century | Climate&Vegetation | Scoop.it
The results of studies that try to quantify the effects of climate change on biodiversity loss — which include damage to the micro scale level of subspecies and genetic variation — are perhaps most shocking.

When, however, you focus on the response to climate change at the macro level, the ecosystem level, you get a better understanding of what is one of the major drivers of that biodiversity loss: forced migrations. And even here, the numbers may be larger than one would expect, as a new assessment by NASA and Caltech published in the journal Climatic Change shows that by 2100 some 40 percent of “major ecological community types” – that is biomes like forest, grassland, tundra – will have switched to a different such state.

According to the same study most of the land on Earth that is not currently desert or under an icecap will undergo at least a 30 percent change in vegetation cover.

[...]

“While warnings of melting glaciers, rising sea levels and other environmental changes are illustrative and important, ultimately, it’s the ecological consequences that matter most,” says John Bergengren from Caltech, who led the study.

It is not just species that have slowly evolved around specific climatic values, the same goes for ecosystems. As another study, recently published in Science, shows tropical biomes like rainforest, savanna and desert are tied to specific climate tipping points. When certain climatic thresholds are crossed the one ecosystem can suddenly switch to the other, as intermediate states somehow prove to be non-existent.

[...]

As ecosystems shift on a timescale of centuries or less, species cannot adapt [because the required structural evolution takes millions of years] so they have to start moving to find other suited habitat, resembling their original climate and vegetation zones. For most species this requires migration towards the poles...

[...]

The largest areas of ecological sensitivity and biome changes predicted for this century are found in areas with the most dramatic climate change: in the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes, particularly along the northern and southern boundaries of taiga or boreal forests.

 


Via Northern_Clips
Carter Roose's insight:

This is a good map of the climate in the 21st century. It is really explaining what has been going on with all of our temperatures. It says it is pretty much flipping the climate where it is getting warm up north.

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UN climate report will not sway US deniers: experts

UN climate report will not sway US deniers: experts | Climate&Vegetation | Scoop.it
Washington (AFP) Sept 21, 2013 - The upcoming UN report on climate change is not likely to rattle US deniers of global warming who hold sway in the halls of power, experts say.

Via SustainOurEarth
Carter Roose's insight:

I think it is interesting how a lot of people don't like global warming. Yet some of it is cause of there cars and other things they use and do. But I think it is dumb how people are getting mad at the people who don't like it. I think they are open to there open opinion.

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Jake Baier's comment, October 2, 2013 11:37 AM
I don't think they know what is going on yet. They're saying it's global COOLING now.
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Cave stalagmite gives clue to 13,000 winters

Cave stalagmite gives clue to 13,000 winters | Climate&Vegetation | Scoop.it

Each winter rainwater from the land above made its way through the cave's ceiling and dripped onto the floor. As each layer of the stalagmite formed, oxygen and carbon isotopes within these raindrops were captured and preserved inside the rock. Now, thousands of years later, a team led by Oxford University scientists is using the data locked inside this stalagmite to get a glimpse of the ancient winter climate of Western North America. 

 

The team's results show that in recent prehistory the region has seen rapid shifts between dry and warm and wet and cold periods. The findings hint at the importance of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation – a pattern of climate variability that changes every 50-70 years – to this area.

 

'We picked Oregon because it's around this latitude where winter storms hit the West coast of North America, it is representative for an area stretching from California to British Columbia,' Vasile Ersek of Oxford University's Department of Earth Sciences, lead author of the report, told me. Water resources in the region are highly dependent on winter rainfall, without the winter rains the land is arid. 

 

'Most other ways of estimating past climate, like tree ring data, only tell us about summers, when plants are growing,' Vasile explains. 'This work gives us a unique insight into winter climate over thousands of years with an unprecedented combination of length, detail and dating accuracy. 'Moreover, because the cave is only around 70 km from the Pacific Ocean, and directly affected by processes occurring over the ocean, it also represents a record of past climate variability in the Eastern Pacific where detailed records of past climate are otherwise very hard to obtain.'

 

The stalagmite record suggests that there have been important variations in both rainfall and temperature (c.1 degree Celsius) over the last 13,000 years – with the region's climate switching between extreme dry-warm and wet-cold periods within just a few decades. But those hoping that this cave rock might tell us about man's influence on the climate will be disappointed; after bearing witness to so many winters its record-keeping stopped before the industrial age began.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Carter Roose's insight:

It is interesting how this little cave could record over 13,000 winters in Oregon. There is ways of telling things from trees but that is durring the summer with the Stalagmite you can tell winter. This little area recorded all the little rain drops that ran into there from the winter. It is a great discovery because it tells us the climate changes in the season.

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Climate study predicts 1,700 US cities and towns are at flood risk within next 80+ years from rising sea levels

Climate study predicts 1,700 US cities and towns are at flood risk within next 80+ years from rising sea levels | Climate&Vegetation | Scoop.it

More than 1,700 American cities and towns – including Boston, New York, and Miami – are at greater risk from rising sea levels than previously feared, a new study has found.

 

By 2100, the future of at least part of these 1,700 locations will be "locked in" by greenhouse gas emissions built up in the atmosphere, theanalysis published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Monday found. For nearly 80 US cities, the watery future will come much sooner, within the next decade even. 

 

The survey does not specify a date by which these cities, or parts of them, would actually fall under water. Instead, it specifies a "locked-in" date, by which time a future under water would be certain – a point of no return.

 

Because of the inertia built into the climate system, even if all carbon emissions stopped immediately, it would take some time for the related global temperature rises to ease off. That means the fate of some cities is already sealed, the study says.

 

"Even if we could just stop global emissions tomorrow on a dime, Fort Lauderdale, Miami Gardens, Hoboken, New Jersey will be under sea level," said Benjamin Strauss, a researcher at Climate Central, and author of the paper. Dramatic cuts in emissions – much greater than Barack Obama and other world leaders have so far agreed – could save nearly 1,000 of those towns, by averting the sea-level rise, the study found.

 

"Hundreds of American cities are already locked into watery futures and we are growing that group very rapidly," Strauss said. "We are locking in hundreds more as we continue to emit carbon into the atmosphere."

 

A recent study, also published in PNAS by the climate scientist Anders Levermann found each 1C rise in atmospheric warming would lead eventually to 2.3m of sea-level rise. The latest study takes those figures, and factors in the current rate of carbon emissions, as well as the best estimate of global temperature sensitivity to pollution.

 

For the study, a location was deemed "under threat" if 25% of its current population lives below the locked-in future high-tide level. Some 1,700 places are at risk in this definition. Even if bar is set higher, at 50% of the current population, 1,400 places would be under threat by 2100.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Carter Roose's insight:

That is no good. If we do have all of those cities start to flood that would be bad. To me if they predict that they should start to see if they can prevent it. To me instead of just announcing it actually do work.

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CineversityTV's curator insight, July 31, 2013 2:51 PM

Make it 20 years and I would believe the article

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Canada's Poor Climate Record Makes Keystone Mitigation Impossible

Canada's Poor Climate Record Makes Keystone Mitigation Impossible | Climate&Vegetation | Scoop.it
Canada’s failure to reduce emissions from its tar sands sector and lackluster climate record has recently been brought into focus. But there are also now questions about whether Canada could mitigate for the climate effects of Keystone XL.

Via SustainOurEarth
Carter Roose's insight:

I think it is bad how they have those problems with the Keystone XL. To me if it is affecting your climate you should be trying to fix it. But it is hard to figure out how to fix it.

 

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Molly Langstraat's curator insight, September 27, 2013 2:16 PM

Canada has put out more emissions than they have cleaned up. As a result it has changed their climate.Their air is very polluted and if they continue to fail to reduce their emissions the level of emissions will continue to rise. I think that Canada could help by putting in filters and trying to make things cleaner and less wastefull in general.

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A Nation On Fire: Climate Change And The Burning Of America

A Nation On Fire: Climate Change And The Burning Of America | Climate&Vegetation | Scoop.it
Wildfires have been bad in the United States, and worsening. With a changing climate, the outlook looks even more bleak.

Via SustainOurEarth
Carter Roose's insight:

This is interesting how that wildfires have gotten bigger in the past years. It be caused by the drought that has been happening. It used to be crazy that big wildfires came. Now it is a commonplace, where it happens they are used to having big wildfires.

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Hinterland Who's Who - Canada's Boreal Forest

Hinterland Who's Who - Canada's Boreal Forest | Climate&Vegetation | Scoop.it

Via Mr. Thompson
Carter Roose's insight:

It is quite interesting on the Boreal Forest and really relates to Canadas vegetation since it takes up quite a bit of Canada. In this Canada has 1/3 of the Boreal Forest. It holds a lot of wildlife species. It is also the worlds biggest and main forest.

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Jane Dennis-Moore's curator insight, November 6, 2013 8:51 AM

Draw a Boreal Forest habitat. Pick an animal that lives in the Boreal forest,  identify and illustrate all the elements that the animal requires to live in the Boreal Forest.

KaitlynandSydney's curator insight, November 30, 2013 5:18 PM

This article on Canada is about the Boreal region, which Canada holds most of...this article explains the many things in the Boreal region