Climate Change, Weather, Ecology & Agriculture
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How climate and weather affect ecology and agriculture.
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Tradition meets innovation in CALS scientist’s tomato breeding efforts | CALS News Center | News from the College of Agricultu...

Tradition meets innovation in CALS scientist’s tomato breeding efforts | CALS News Center | News from the College of Agricultu... | Climate Change, Weather, Ecology & Agriculture | Scoop.it

News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at NC State University

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CALS Research, NCSU's curator insight, February 8, 2013 2:29 PM

Combining new tools, such as marker-assisted selection (MAS) with time-honored methods, Dr. Dilip Panthee carries on NCSU’s strong tradition in plant breeding, developing hardier, higher-yielding plants for NC's $30B/year tomato industry.

 

NCSU's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS) has the nation’s largest university plant breeding program; and Pantheeproudly follows in the footsteps of Dr. Randy Gardner, a retired breeder credited with developing the cultivars used on some 60-75% of the vine-ripe tomatoes grown in the Eastern US.

 

Working at the Mt. Horticultural Crops Research & Extension Center in Mills River, Panthee focuses on developing tomato breeding lines and cultivars with three traits: disease resistance, fruit quality and stress tolerance. That’s because, in a survey he conducted, these three traits were the ones NC  growers reported needing the most.

 

Read more about our tomato breeding program:

http://www.cals.ncsu.edu/agcomm/news-center/?p=21430

 

http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/fletcher/programs/tomato/

 

http://www.cals.ncsu.edu/achievement/tomato_breeding.htm

 

Some of our releases:

http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/fletcher/programs/tomato/publications.html

 

 

 

 

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Can agriculture adapt to climate change?

Can agriculture adapt to climate change? | Climate Change, Weather, Ecology & Agriculture | Scoop.it
Rising temperatures blamed on climate change could devastate the country’s agricultural industry within the next century, costing farmers to battle new pests, faster-growing weeds and smaller crop yields.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

The USDA Office of the Chief Economist has issued two reports -- one for agriculture, one for forestry -- outlining climate change threats and strategies for adapting agriculture to the alterations in the growing climate. A link to the full report, "Agricultural Adaptation to a Changing Climate: Economic and Environmental Implications Vary by Region" (July 2012), appears in the story.

The report is from the Economic Research Service, part of USDA and is ERS Report Number 136.

 

Photo: USDA

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Rescooped by CALS Research, NCSU from Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service
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Researchers Regroup Post Sandy

Researchers Regroup Post Sandy | Climate Change, Weather, Ecology & Agriculture | Scoop.it
Researchers return to New York City next month to continue their study of insect populations in urban areas in the wake of Hurricane Sandy.
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CALS Research, NCSU's curator insight, February 6, 2013 4:20 PM

"When Sandy whipped through the Mid-Atlantic, also swept through an NCSU research project collecting data on NYC insects. Researchers return to the storm-ravaged region shortly. Ecologists Amy Savage & Elsa Youngsteadt placed sticky card traps, data loggers & other measuring devices in NYC park trees. Youngsteadt was studying how urban warming affects arthropods (scale insects, leaf hoppers, caterpillars). Savage was studying the ecology of Manhattan’s ants."

 

Both researchers are members of the team of Your Wild Life, from the lab of Dr. Rob R. Dunn in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NCSU. You'll find their profiles here:

http://www.yourwildlife.org/about-us/

 

Read the story at:

http://bulletin.ncsu.edu/2013/02/insects/