Climate change and the arts
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Climate change and the arts
Artists and arts institutions engage in the climate crisis as part of the solution. http://climatesafety.info/?page_id=2046
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How one artist put climate activism on paper

How one artist put climate activism on paper | Climate change and the arts | Scoop.it

At her studio in New York City, Schragis creates intricate mind-maps, drawn diagrams that connect words and images with a dizzying array of lines. For Occupy, she drew a complex flowchart that mapped out the connections between the many issues that became part of the movement.

http://grist.org/people/how-one-artist-put-climate-activism-on-paper/

Rachel Schragis pays homage to the People's Climate March in Post-its and ink.

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Climate change play tackles elephant in the room

Climate change play tackles elephant in the room | Climate change and the arts | Scoop.it

Australian playwright Stephen Carleton is part of a growing and urgent movement of artists around the world determined to tackle environmental issues and climate change denial head-on. Stephen Carleton's absurd black comedy ‘The Turquoise Elephant’ won a Griffin Award in 2015. 


 » Sydney Morning Herald - 17 Oct 2016:
Climate change play tackles elephant in the room

http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/theatre/climate-change-play-tackles-elephant-in-the-room-20161014-gs28h4.html

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Music for a Warming World – and a Requiem for Coal

Music for a Warming World – and a Requiem for Coal | Climate change and the arts | Scoop.it

A one hour multimedia music performance called ‘Music for a Warming World ... and a Requiem for Coal’ is going to be put on in All Saints Anglican Church, 113 Noble Street, Newtown, on Friday 11 March 2016 at 6pm.

Stunning visuals and original folk and world music telling the biggest story of our time.


$15 at the door. The concert is followed by a short address and tea/coffee.


Dr Simon Kerr plays guitars and sings, backed by Kylie Morrigan on violin, Tiya Beggs on vocals, and Scott Lewis on piano and keyboards.

Simon Kerr is a science research administrator and a songwriter, guitarist and climate thinker.


Christine Parker - a professor of law at Melbourne University - has produced the images and video.


The performance is a musical reflection as a way of focusing on socially important issues, particularly climate change. A challenging, entertaining and warmhearted journey into climate change, speaking honestly about the science, the inevitable changes that will come and what we can do.

It is also about the joy of being human in the face of humanity’s greatest challenge, enjoying this moment of music, community and hope for the future

QUOTES

‘A new way of thinking about climate change’
~ Professor Rod Keenan, Forest and Ecosystem Science, The University of Melbourne

‘If you've been in despair, thinking what the hell can I do about climate change .. see Simon Kerr's ‘Music for a Warming World’
~ Mal Webb, Australian music icon


‘So fresh and innovative, I can't speak highly enough about the show’
~ Fan from a recent Brisbane show


‘They tackle the overpowering zeitgeist of climate change, turning it into climate courage. See it and your hope and energy could be restored’
~ Professor Adrian Evans, Faculty of Law, Monash University


Climate change never sounded so good!


» For more information, see:
http://www.simonkerrmusic.net/music-for-a-warming-world


» Church contact: Adrian Evans, adrian.evans@monash.edu.au


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The splashiest exhibit at Art Basel Miami ... is about climate change

The splashiest exhibit at Art Basel Miami ... is about climate change | Climate change and the arts | Scoop.it
Artist Lars Jan wants to show off human resilience (and stubbornness) by putting performers in a giant aquarium tank.
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Climate change: Where are the artists?

Climate change: Where are the artists? | Climate change and the arts | Scoop.it

“There was a day when the comedians, songwriters, and writers were the heralds of change in the West. Now the bullhorn of earth activism has been seized by unlikely citizens who do scary things.

I'm thinking of the band of stalwarts who occupied UK's Tate Modern, writing the words of Margaret Atwood and Naomi Klein on the floor of the Turbine Room. Liberate Tate! Yes! Overwhelm the big museum with climate scrawlings!

As the basic laws of the planet shift, we will outgrow the laws of our art forms, our careers and our uninvolved consumerism. Strange-feeling decisions will be made. "Breaking the frame" is necessary at this time. Put it plain: we must risk arrest.”

By Reverend Billy - Spiritual Leader of the Church of Stop Shopping

 

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Climate science is looking to art to create change

Climate science is looking to art to create change | Climate change and the arts | Scoop.it
Scientists and policy makers are struggling in some countries to gain the support that will lead to meaningful action on climate change. Could art be the answer?
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Ackroyd & Harvey on "the creative response to climate change" | Transition Network

Ackroyd & Harvey on "the creative response to climate change" | Transition Network | Climate change and the arts | Scoop.it

In a section for Lucy Neal's book 'Playing for Time' Heather Ackroyd writes about "energising the creative response to climate change". What does that creative response to climate change look like, and why do we need one?

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Climarte: addressing climate change through art

Climarte: addressing climate change through art | Climate change and the arts | Scoop.it
Joanna Bosse, curator at the Ian Potter Museum of Art at the University of Melbourne introduces a new exhibition on show from 31 March to 5 July as part of Climarte Festival.
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Canada: Artists demand Harper protect national park from fracking

Canada: Artists demand Harper protect national park from fracking | Climate change and the arts | Scoop.it
ST. JOHN'S, N.L. - Canadian artists, writers and musicians ranging from Hey Rosetta to novelist Joseph Boyden are pushing for action to protect Gros Morne National Park in western Newfoundland.They've signed an open letter to Prime Minister Stephen H...
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Climate Change Vancouver Songs

Vancouver Climate Change Rally with songs and music. Thousands joined the rally to protest government inaction and corporate control of the Harper government.
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New Age: Music about climate change

http://www.newagemusicgarden.com/ 'Lament' is new age music instrumental from the forthcoming 'Arcadia' album later this year. This is the latest in a series of videos featuring beautiful film...
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The politics of climate change: Inuit pride, language and human rights

The politics of climate change: Inuit pride, language and human rights | Climate change and the arts | Scoop.it
Words have the power to change and define how we feel about something. Politicians know this. So do media.

And so when leaders and communicators use certain words over and over to define concepts or ideas, those words become embedded in our vocabulary — sometimes without us even realizing it’s happening.

Becky Mearns and Emilie Cameron, a graduate student and an instructor, respectively, at Carleton University’s department of geography and environmental studies, have been thinking about this for a while, specifically when it comes to translating climate change concepts into Inuktitut.

After some research and discussion, the two discovered a few curious things.

A decade ago, policy papers, research, government documents and even Inuit organizations, focused on climate change as a human-caused phenomenon that was impacting northern peoples more than any other population and that needed to be mitigated through the global reduction of fossil fuel consumption, among other actions.

But recently, the language from government officials and academics has changed from slowing down climate change and protecting northern peoples’ “right to be cold” to how northern people can learn how to adapt to the changes.

In other words, climate change has come to be seen as inevitable and Northerners are being instructed to be resilient to cope with the coming wave of impacts.

Policy documents and strategies recently released by the Government of Nunavut and Inuit Circumpolar Council, for example, reflect this new world view, the women argue.

Mearns and Cameron were interested in this terminology shift, and how it impacted the Inuktitut words used for climate change.

Their discussions lead to a paper they co-authored with Janet Tamalik McGrath entitled “Translating Climate Change: Adaptation, Resilience, and Climate Politics in Nunavut.”

The article appears in the December 2014 issue of Annals of the Association of American Geographers, the themes of which were presented publicly at the December ArcticNet conference in Ottawa.

“Adaptation and resilience shift the burden of responding to climate change from those who cause it to those who are most affected,” their paper says.

Cameron and Mearns explained why they wrote the paper once their talk at the Ottawa conference was over.

“When people do research about climate change adaptation in the North, I think many elders who participate feel very proud of demonstrating their resilience and adaptability,” Cameron told Nunatsiaq News.

“So we’re not discounting people’s tremendous resilience and adaptive capacities but more so, we point to the fact that climate change is not entirely an environmental issue, it’s a political issue and it’s an issue of injustice and harm.

The Inuktitut term most often used for climate change has been silaup asijjiqpallianinga, which refers to ongoing continuous change in sila.

But there are problems with this term.

When sila is translated back into English, it means climate, weather or environment but sila is a broader “super-concept,” Cameron and Mearns argue, which can incorporate air, atmosphere, sky, intellect, wisdom, spirit, earth and universe.

And so to say that sila is changing is obvious to Inuit: sila has always been in a state of flux and Inuit have changed along with it.

“To observe and adapt to change is one of the most valued and respected skills among Inuit,” the two researchers’ paper says. “It reflects not only great knowledge, skill and character but also a kind of alignment with the world and a refinement of spirit.

“Adaptation, in such a context calls on Inuktitut values and traditions of observation, patience, and commitment to knowledge.”

And when climate change concepts include the idea of resilience — annagunnarninga — that, too, is a point of Inuit pride.

When someone is suffering, Inuit often use the word ajurnarmat, the paper explains, as both “a statement of fact and an expression of sympathy” because it means both that “things are difficult” and “it can’t be helped.”

But to put the onus on Inuit to adapt and be resilient in the face of human-induced climate change, and to use traditional words to rally support for that plan of action is not only unfair, the authors argue — it’s political.

“The call for Inuit to be resilient is issued in a context where that resilience is already strained by intergenerational trauma; inadequate housing, social and health services; compromised food security; and poverty.”

If, instead, climate change was translated into Inuktitut to mean the unethical treatment of sila, then concepts of Inuit justice, conflict resolution and reconciliation and could be invoked.

“Within Inuit frameworks, healing and justice are only possible insofar as those who have caused harm acknowledge and account for their actions and work to restore harmony,” the paper states.

“It is those who cause and benefit from ongoing harm to sila, and its impacts on Inuit lives and lands, who are required to restore balance and right relations.”

The authors conclude that just as Inuit had to learn about and adopt the concepts of “private property” and “sub-surface rights” in order to negotiate land claims, so too must they adopt the concept that sila is changing because of human behaviour — something that may have seemed preposterous to traditional Inuit.

“One of the things we talked about is beginning that discussion,” Mearns said afterward, “and broadening that discussion with others in the North and to begin talking about terminology and to make that shift, to work together to shift the focus back to social justice.”

Via Charles Tiayon
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The Climate+Change Exhibition at the Nepal Art Council

The Climate+Change Exhibition at the Nepal Art Council | Climate change and the arts | Scoop.it
The Climate+Change Exhibition at the Nepal Art Council | VS {Photosharing} http://t.co/zDgNtexDDI via @sharing4good @ICIMOD #climateaction
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They create art over data from a changing climate and melting ice

Winner of the Art & Interaction category at SXSWeco's Place By Design competition, 2016 Phase Change creatively re-presents the effects of climate change…


Sometimes you have to melt some ice to make a point. The art collective Futures North just won the Art + Interaction prize at SXSW Eco for Phase Change, a project that combined pre-industrial ice harvesting techniques with 21st-century computer modeling to create a physical model of a changing climate. Here’s how it worked: Futures North cut blocks of ice from a Minnesota lake during the dead of winter and stored them in an old-fashioned ice house.

 When June rolled around, the team stacked the ice blocks under a lattice of infrared lights programmed to turn on and off based on three climate scenarios: one where the industrial era never happened; one based on today’s climate; and one future based on the most disastrous forecasts.

Less visible was how climate change put every step of the project in doubt. “It was such a warm winter that we weren’t even sure if the ice would be thick enough,” said Molly Reichert, one of the project’s leads. “It was such a warm spring, weren’t sure if there would be any ice by June.” Visitors got to take bottles of meltwater home. “It’s beautiful,” one visitor said, “to see such a tragic thing come to life.”

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A coalition of creative people taking action on climate change

A coalition of creative people taking action on climate change | Climate change and the arts | Scoop.it
The creative industries can make a unique contribution to the global sustainability challenge. Creativity is part of every society and culture, generating communities of shared identity and experience.

Globally we have huge potential to inspire positive and sustainable change through the millions of livelihoods and billions of participants involved in our work.

This coalition originated as a call to action presented at the 2015 international climate talks, COP21. With the world's first universal agreement on climate change now in place, the real work begins.

The Pledge
We can bring about positive change faster together, by combining our collective strengths to amplify concerns and celebrate solutions.

 We Will:
Take action ourselves to make our work more sustainable Speak out and up, using our voices to accelerate positive change Jointly support one another, sharing campaigns and knowledge Use our creativity to find, and scale, solutions

Sign the Pledge:
www.creativeclimatecoalition.com
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Artist turns climate data into striking paintings

Artist turns climate data into striking paintings | Climate change and the arts | Scoop.it
Jill Pelto's watercolor art combines imagery from the natural world with hard data showing climate change's impact.
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Can fiction make people care about climate? Paolo Bacigalupi thinks so

Can fiction make people care about climate? Paolo Bacigalupi thinks so | Climate change and the arts | Scoop.it
"The Water Knife" author turns drought into drama in his newest book, and teaches us all a thing or two about ourselves.
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Why climate action needs the arts

Why climate action needs the arts | Climate change and the arts | Scoop.it

Why climate action needs the arts | Andrew Simms writes in The Guardian on 4 June 2015: “Whether to engage in debate or change opinion and behaviour, arts can play a key role in the cultural awakening of the masses to the perils of climate change”

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20+ Powerful Street Art Pieces That Tell The Uncomfortable Truth

20+ Powerful Street Art Pieces That Tell The Uncomfortable Truth | Climate change and the arts | Scoop.it
The graffiti and street art on this list is perfect for spreading messages about environmentalism and climate change to a wider audience. It uses simple slogans and provocative images to spread important and inspiring ideas in ways that are easy to remember.
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Report: Sustaining Great Art

Report: Sustaining Great Art | Climate change and the arts | Scoop.it

Following the second year of the partnership between Arts Council England and Julie's Bicycle, this report presents the mid-term results of environmental reporting and shows how the arts and culture sector is increasingly choosing to take positive action.

» See more at: http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/advice-and-guidance/browse-advice-and-guidance/sustaining-great-art-mid-term-results

» Report - 16 pages (PDF) 

http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/media/uploads/Sustaining_Great_Art_Environmental_Report_MidTerm_results.pdf

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‘Transition Town: The Musical’: £7,848 raised on kickstarter.com with 32 days to hit £10,000

‘Transition Town: The Musical’: £7,848 raised on kickstarter.com with 32 days to hit £10,000 | Climate change and the arts | Scoop.it
The plan is to make a joyous musical show about dreamers and do-ers rolling up their sleeves and changing the world – a bit at a time
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Student art project illustrates climate change causes, effects

Student art project illustrates climate change causes, effects | Climate change and the arts | Scoop.it
BRATTLEBORO >> Members of Preserve Our Planet and the Art Club at Brattleboro Union High School collaborated on an project to make a statement about climate change.
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Hip-hop for Climate Change | Weekly Music Commentary

Hip-hop for Climate Change | Weekly Music Commentary | Climate change and the arts | Scoop.it
‘The People’s Climate Music’ album HOME — or Heal Our Mother Earth — is a hip hop album produced with Hip Hop Caucus, and released in partnership with NRDC, 350.org, Avaaz, and Sierra Club.
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Amazing art makes climate change conceivable

Amazing art makes climate change conceivable | Climate change and the arts | Scoop.it
The national conversation on climate change is far too politicized to be productive; in this environment, the earnest presentation of facts and studies isn't bringing the reality of rising seas home to people.
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New Quilt Exhibit at Biscayne Uses Art to Explore the Impacts of Climate Change

New Quilt Exhibit at Biscayne Uses Art to Explore the Impacts of Climate Change | Climate change and the arts | Scoop.it

#Quilting #Art Explores The Impacts Of #ClimateChange http://t.co/AT3UvLQ3NH #actonclimate http://t.co/CE6ai6FV16

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