Climate change and crops
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Rescooped by Vasta Hsu from Longevity science
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Do-it-yourself CRISPR genome editing kits bring genetic engineering to your kitchen bench

Do-it-yourself CRISPR genome editing kits bring genetic engineering to your kitchen bench | Climate change and crops | Scoop.it
CRISPR genome editing is one of the most significant, world-changing technologies of our era, allowing scientists to make incredibly precise cut n' paste edits to the DNA of living organisms. Now, one synthetic biologist from NASA plans to make it as accessible as a home science kit, so you can bio-hack yeast and bacteria on your kitchen bench.

If you're not up to date with how CRISPR gene editing works, take a quick look at this excellent MIT video. In short, CRISPR/Cas9 is a radically fast and easy way to precisely cut and replace DNA sections in a living organism. It has revolutionised biomedical research and opens up all kinds of opportunities for gene therapy and genetic engineering.

Via Ray and Terry's
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Rescooped by Vasta Hsu from Plant roots and rhizosphere
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Trends in Plant Science - Shaping a root system: regulating lateral versus primary root growth

Trends in Plant Science - Shaping a root system: regulating lateral versus primary root growth | Climate change and crops | Scoop.it

Primary and lateral roots comprise root systems, which are vital to the growth and survival of plants. Several molecular mechanisms associated with primary and lateral root growth have been described, including some common regulatory factors for their initiation and development. However, in this opinion article, we discuss the distinct growth behavior of lateral roots in response to environmental cues, such as salinity, gravity, and nutrient availability, which are mediated via specific regulators. We propose that differential growth dynamics between primary and lateral roots are crucial for plants to adapt to the ever-changing environmental conditions.


Via Jennifer Mach, Christophe Jacquet
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Rescooped by Vasta Hsu from Sustain Our Earth
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The link between climate change and the food on your plate

The link between climate change and the food on your plate | Climate change and crops | Scoop.it
The results of climate change are already altering the way crops pollinate, mature and produce. Over time, they could change what we eat and when we eat it.

Via SustainOurEarth
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Rescooped by Vasta Hsu from leapmind
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GMOs Could be an Important Tool in Feeding the World | MIT Technology Review

GMOs Could be an Important Tool in Feeding the World | MIT Technology Review | Climate change and crops | Scoop.it

Climate change will make it increasingly difficult to feed the world. Biotech crops will have an essential role in ensuring that there’s enough to eat.


Via LeapMind
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Rescooped by Vasta Hsu from Plant Phenotyping
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Plant Phenotyping and Plant Phenomics

Following the huge accomplishments in plant genetics the subsequent challenge is the mapping of large populations for a better understanding of plant ...

Via Marcus Jansen
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Rescooped by Vasta Hsu from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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So what does it all mean? How do scientists affect goverment policies?

So what does it all mean? How do scientists affect goverment policies? | Climate change and crops | Scoop.it

"Relations between science and policy are sometimes troubled....Prominent examples include the acrimonious debate over scientific understandings of climate change ....disputes over the use of genetically modified crops and foods in Europe, the failure to acknowledge the risk of possible BSE transmission to humans. and conflict over stem cell research....".

 

The interface between science and society is not simple, but sometimes it's good to stretch our minds in a different direction.


Via Mary Williams
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Rescooped by Vasta Hsu from Plants and Microbes
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Nature Reviews Microbiology: Going back to the roots: the microbial ecology of the rhizosphere (2013)

Nature Reviews Microbiology: Going back to the roots: the microbial ecology of the rhizosphere (2013) | Climate change and crops | Scoop.it

The rhizosphere is the interface between plant roots and soil where interactions among a myriad of microorganisms and invertebrates affect biogeochemical cycling, plant growth and tolerance to biotic and abiotic stress. The rhizosphere is intriguingly complex and dynamic, and understanding its ecology and evolution is key to enhancing plant productivity and ecosystem functioning. Novel insights into key factors and evolutionary processes shaping the rhizosphere microbiome will greatly benefit from integrating reductionist and systems-based approaches in both agricultural and natural ecosystems. Here, we discuss recent developments in rhizosphere research in relation to assessing the contribution of the micro- and macroflora to sustainable agriculture, nature conservation, the development of bio-energy crops and the mitigation of climate change.


Via Francis Martin, Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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